Upcoming in January on Fieldstone Common

Be sure to mark your calendar. We’ll be giving away some great books during the live broadcasts of Fieldstone Common.

3 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
In Death Lamented with Sarah Nehama on Fieldstone Common
In Death Lamented with Sarah Nehama. Sarah Nehama is a jeweler who has a passion for historical jewelry, in particular mourning jewelry. She is the curator of the recent exhibit on mourning jewelry at the Mass. Historical Society and the author of the companion book In Death Lamented.

10 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
New England Genealogy with David Allen Lambert on Fieldstone Common

New England Genealogy with David Allen Lambert. David Allen Lambert is the Chief Genealogist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society. His book A Guide to Massachusetts Cemetery is already in the 2nd edition. We will talk about Cemetery Research, Native American and African genealogy and hopefully a little  baseball too.
17 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone Common
The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Mofford Haines.  Whether it was Sabbath-breaking, blasphemy, or public drunkenness, colonial laws were strict and frequently broken, and those who broke them could expect swift punishment. We’ll discuss from a time when accused felons often pleaded in their own defense: “The Devil made me do it!”
24 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
Carved in Stone with Thomas Gilson on Fieldstone Common
Carved in Stone with William Gilson on Fieldstone Common
Carved in Stone with Thomas and William Gilson. Thomas and William Gilson have created a book that captures the art and beauty of colonial gravestones in words and photographs. Take a virtual walk with us through New England’s oldest graveyards.
31 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
The Caning with Stephen Puleo on Fieldstone Common
The Caning with Stephen Puleo. One of the most shocking and provocative events in American history, the caning of Senator Charles Sumner in 1856 convinced the north and the south that the gulf between them was unbridgeable. As a result of the caning, the country was pushed, inexorably and unstoppably, to war.
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – In Death Lamented with Sarah Nehama

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 3 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Sarah Nehama, author of In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

You can learn more about Sarah Nehama and her jewelery business from her web page. You can also follow her on Twitter.

The book In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry is available for purchase from the Amazon.com.

In addition to being a book, In Death Lamented is an exhibit at the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston, Massachusetts. The exhibit is available for viewing through January 31, 2013. It is well worth the visit! 

The Massachusetts Historical Society, the publisher of In Death Lamented, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show. One copy went to a listener in Massachusetts and the other to a listener in Virginia. A big thank you to the Massachusetts Historical Society for  their generosity!


Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

In Death Lamented Now Available as a Podcast

The most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Sarah Nehama, author of the book In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Image by Derrickkwa

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

In Death Lamented – The Exhibit

The In Death Lamented Exhibit at the Massachusetts Historical Society

In Death Lamented exhibit at
the Massachusetts Historical Society

Recently I had the opportunity to view In Death Lamented, the current exhibit at the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston, Massachusetts.  The exhibit displays 3 centuries of Anglo-American mourning jewelry.

Hair braiding tool

Hair braiding tool

I had the pleasure of being guided through the exhibit by curator, Sarah Nehama who also happens to be this week’s guest on Fieldstone Common.

The Haven-Cheever Brooch

The exhibit contains two rooms full of mourning jewelry and supporting items such as paintings, embroidery and other items that further explain the story of mourning jewelry.  One of the more unusual items was a tool used to braid hair into tiny braids that could be placed in mourning jewelry or even used as the rope for bracelets or necklaces.

During the tour, we stopped to record Sarah speaking about the history and style of a single piece of jewelry – the Haven-Cheever Brooch. Listen to the audio clip (click play on the top of the page) to get a sense about why mourning jewelry was created.  Then listen in live on Thursday, January 3, 2013 at 1pm EST to hear the full interview with Sarah Nehama.

In Death Lamented
companion book

The FREE exhibit will continue at the Massachusetts Historical Society through the end of January 2013. It is well worth the trip into Boston. For those of you who live too far to visit, there is a beautiful, color companion book which features many of the jewelery pieces on display.

Details
Exhibit: In Death Lamented, Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry
Curators: Sarah Nehama and Anne E. Bentley
Location: The Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, MA
Duration: Sept. 28, 2012 through Jan. 31, 2013
Cost: Free
Book: In Death Lamented by Sarah Nehama

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

In Death Lamented with Sarah Nehama

In Death Lamented by Sarah Nehama on Fieldstone Common
In Death Lamented by Sarah Nehama



This Thursday on Fieldstone Common we will speak with jeweler, author and curator Sarah Nehama about In Death Lamented, an exhibit on mourning jewelry.

Sarah Nehama on Fieldstone CommonMourning jewels, tangible expressions of love and sorrow, are the focus of In Death Lamented on view at the Massachusetts Historical Society (MHS) through 31 January 2013. The exhibition features more than 80 objects representing some of the best examples of this type of jewelry. Exhibition highlights include the Society’s Adams-Winthrop commemorative seal ring containing the braided hair of John Quincy Adams and a gold memorial ring for Queen Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach.

The jewelry included in the exhibition illustrates some of the most exemplary types, from early gold bands with death’s head iconography to bejeweled brooches and the intricately woven hairwork pieces of the Civil War era. Displayed within the larger context of the mourning rites that our New England ancestors brought with them, these relics attest to the basic human emotion of grief and the need to remain connected to those gone before.

A full-color companion book, In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry features photographs and descriptions of all of the Nehama and MHS pieces, along with historical and stylistic backgrounds and essays pertaining to cultural practices around death and mourning in England and America.

About the Guest Curator and Author
Sarah Nehama is a designer/jeweler who works in precious metals and gemstones. She sells her work through galleries, at juried shows, and to private customers. Sarah has a degree in art history and studied jewelry making in Boston and New York. She is a collector of antique mourning and sentimental jewelry and currently resides in Boston.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis