May on Fieldstone Common

Be sure to mark your calendar. We’ll be giving away some great books during the live broadcasts of Fieldstone Common.

2 May 2013 at 1pm EST  Melinde Lutz Byrne Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts with Melinde Lutz Byrne. Melinde Lutz Sanborn discussing her book Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records, Essex County, Massachusetts, 1692-1745 as well her her “Jane Doe” forensic cold case
9 May 2013 at 1pm EST Allegra di Bonaventura For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura.  In this engrossing narrative of family life and the slave experience in the colonial North, Allegra di Bonaventura describes the complexity of this master/slave relationship and traces the intertwining stories of two families until the eve of the Revolution..
16 May 2013 at 1pm EST Barbara Silberman Judith Sargent Murray with Barbara Silberman. Judith Sargent Murray was an 18th century essayist who believed in equal education, a woman’s right to work outside the home and equal roles between men and women in marriage..
23 May 2013 at 1pm EST Dr. Linford Fisher The Indian Great Awakening with Dr. Linford Fisher. The First Great Awakening was a time of heightened religious activity in colonial New England. Among those whom the English settlers tried to convert to Christianity were the region’s native peoples. In this book, Linford Fisher tells the gripping story of American Indians’ attempts to wrestle with the ongoing realities of colonialism between the 1670s and 1820.
30 May 2013 at 1pm EST Nancy Rubin Stuart Defiant Brides with Nancy Rubin Stuart. In Defiant Brides, the first dual biography of both Peggy Shippen Arnold and Lucy Flucker Knox, Stuart has crafted a rich portrait of two rebellious women who defied expectations and struggled—publicly and privately—in a volatile political moment in early America.

Show Notes – For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura

For Adam's Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 9 May 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Allegra di Bonaventura about her book For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

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For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England, published by Liveright Publishing, a division of WW Norton & Company is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The story of For Adam’s Sake revolves around five New London, Connecticut families across several generations in the 1600s and early 1700s.  The families include:

The John Jackson family. This includes his wife, Joan Jackson and their children (among them Adam) and Joan’s mother. They are a combination of enslaved and free African Americans.

The Joshua Hempstead family. It’s Joshua’s diary that forms the basis of the story. The diary has been published and is available for sale from the New London County Historical Society.

The Rogers family. The well to do family is headed by James Rogers but it is son John who is the focus of this story. John become the head of the Rogerenes sect of Adventists.

The Livingston family. Though a New York Anglo/Dutch, son John Livingston moves to New London, Connecticut and marries Fitz Winthrop’s daughter, Mary.

The Winthrop family. The story focuses on the families of Fitz and Waitstill Winthrop who are brothers and grandsons of John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Liveright Publishing, the publisher of For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Vermont and Missouri. A big thank you to the Liveright Publishing for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

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For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura now a Podcast

PodcasticonbeDerickkwaThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Allegra di Bonaventura discussing her book For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura

For Adam's Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura on Fieldstone Common For Adam's Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura photo by Andrew HoganLIVE: THURSDAY, 9 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Allega di Bonaventura, author of For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England.

In the tradition of Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s classic, A Midwife’s Tale, comes this groundbreaking narrative by one of America’s most promising colonial historians. Joshua Hempstead was a well-respected farmer and tradesman in New London, Connecticut. As his remarkable diary—kept from 1711 until 1758—reveals, he was also a slave owner who owned Adam Jackson for over thirty years. In this engrossing narrative of family life and the slave experience in the colonial North, Allegra di Bonaventura describes the complexity of this master/slave relationship and traces the intertwining stories of two families until the eve of the Revolution. Slavery is often left out of our collective memory of New England’s history, but it was hugely impactful on the central unit of colonial life: the family. In every corner, the lines between slavery and freedom were blurred as families across the social spectrum fought to survive. In this enlightening study, a new portrait of an era emerges.

Allegra di Bonaventura is an assistant dean at the Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in New Haven, Connecticut. Her dissertation was awarded the George Washington Egleston Prize.

Author photo by Andrew Hogan