Second chance to win a copy of Remembering Adamsville

Remembering Adamsville by the Little Compton Historical SocietyWe have two more copies of Remembering Adamsville to give away!

The current Fieldstone Common episode is an interview with Little Compton, Rhode Island Historical Society Director, Marjory O’Toole about the book Remember Adamsville. This book is the result of a village-wide oral history project.

If you’re connected to Adamsville in Little Compton, Rhode Island or just interested in seeing the end-product of a really well done oral history project then this book is for you!

To qualify to win one of the two copies simply leave a comment on the Fieldstone Common Facebook page with your best tip for doing oral history interviews or projects. If you’re not on Facebook, you can send your tip via the Fieldstone Common contact form.

This is a one-day only giveaway. Post your tip by 9pm EST today, 18 December 2013.

FC 69 Remembering Adamsville Oral History Project with Marjory O’Toole

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Marjory O’Toole, editor of the book Remembering Adamsville which is the culmination of a village-wide oral history project.

Bio

Marjory O’Toole is the full-time Managing Director of the Little Compton, Rhode Island Historical Society and a part-time student in the John Nicholas Brown Public Humanities Marjory O'Toole Remembering AdamsvilleProgram at Brown University.

Marjory is a lifelong resident of Little Compton who fondly remembers trips to Adamsville with her grandmother to buy candy at Simmons’ Store. Today she lives a few miles away from the village with her husband and three children.

You can learn more about Marjory from her website.

Book Summary

Remembering Adamsville is the written end-product of an oral history project undertaken in the village of Adamsville in Little Compton, Rhode Island. The book chronicles the memories of many Adamsville residents and provides a solid representation of life in the village.

Book InfoRemembering Adamsville by the Little Compton Historical Society

Title: Remembering Adamsville

Publisher: Little Compton Historical Society (2013)

Trade paperback; 252 pages with an index and lots of color and BxW photos and illustrations. Alphabetical by participant.

Remembering Adamsville is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we talk about every aspect of conducting a town-wide oral history project from the volunteers needed to pull it off to engaging the interviewees. We’ve left no stone unturned during our discussion but perhaps most important was the powerful message that arose as a result the project. While collecting history is important, the coming together of a community and forging stronger ties with each other was perhaps the greatest benefit of all.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Remembering Adamsville were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the Little Compton Historical Society.

The winners are:

  • Beth Finch McCarthy of Massachusetts
  • Candace Breen of Rhode Island

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the Little Compton Historical Society for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/remembering-adamsville-oral-history-marjory-otoole/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 69)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 69 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 68 Colonial New England Speech with Joan Bines

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Joan Bines, author of the book Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now.

Bio

Joan Bines received her BA from Brandeis University and her doctorate from the Words They Lived ByUniversity of Virginia in American diplomatic history. After teaching for many years, she became director of the Golden Ball Tavern Museum, a gracious 1760s Georgian tavern and home in Weston, Massachusetts. Here with a dedicated group of volunteers, she oversaw and continues to oversee the preservation of the museum and to build its education and outreach programs. Here also, she has been able to indulge her love of words, their histories and meanings, as well as her love photography.

You can learn more about Joan’s photography at her website as well as check out information about the Golden Ball Tavern Museum.

Book Summary

Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now offers an entertaining and informative peephole into colonial New England life, as well as giving insight into a bit of our own.

Book InfoWords They Lived By

Title: Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now

Publisher: IBJ Book Publishing (2013)

Trade paperback; 147 pages with bibliography, index and lots of color and BxW photos and illustrations.

Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we talk about the many words used in colonial speech that are still in use now but may have different meanings. Words like diaper, alarm, neglige, loggerhead and many more. We also discuss the Golden Ball Tavern Museum and the library and archives resources available there.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Joan Bines.

The winners are:

  • Cathy Blancato of Maryland
  • Susan LeBlanc of Oregon

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to Joan for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/colonial-new-england-speech-with-joan-bines

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 68)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 68 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Researching Food: Post Script with Peter G. Rose

Traditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter G. RoseRecently, I interviewed food historian Peter G. Rose about her book Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch (Listen to the interview here). The book describes the traditions and celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch, some of which were carried over from the Netherlands and some of which were adopted in the new world.

With this Post Script interview we dig a little deeper into the occupation of a food historian and how it differs from other types of historians.

Post Script: Researching Food with Peter G. Rose

MPL: How did you become a food historian?

PGR: Becoming a food historian gradually happened as a natural extension of my work as a food columnist for the NY Gannett newspapers. We live in the Hudson Valley and more and more I became aware of the Valley’s Dutch roots. When I visited Historic Hudson Valley’s offices, the curator asked me to look at a Dutch book they had in their archives and to tell her about it. It was the 1683 edition of The Pleasurable Country Life, a book on gardening, beekeeping, medicines, and also a cookbook. That was in the early 1980’s and it took me a long time to properly research its background and – in the time of typewriters – to transcribe the cookbook part as it was too fragile to photocopy.  By 1989, Syracuse University Press published it  with the title The Sensible Cook: Dutch Foodways in the Old and the New World and that was really the beginning for me.

MPL: What do food historians focus on in their work and how do they differ from other types of historians?

PGR: Food historians as you can imagine focus on food. Some study agriculture, fishing or milling or some specific food, others are more interested in preparation, or specific dishes, others look more at ethnic development, assimilation, and cultural connections. For me it was a no-brainer, since I am Dutch, I wanted to know about the Dutch influence on the American kitchen and that is what I have given my attention to for the last 3 decades. What makes my specialty of Dutch food easier to research is that we have so much visual evidence in the paintings of the Golden Age of The Netherlands and American museums have many holdings of Dutch 17th-century art.

MPL: The term “historical foodways” is often associated food historians. What does it mean?

PGR: Foodways is a collective noun which encompasses not only recipes and preparation, Traditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter G. Rosebut also social customs of the period.
To illustrate:

From 18th and 19th century hand-written Dutch-American cookbooks belonging to the descendants of the early settlers, we know that they continued to cook in the manner of their forebears. Many of the recipes indicate not only the method of preparation but reveal that Dutch social customs continued here as well, as revealed for example by a recipe for doot koeckjes, which are funeral biscuits. From a Schenectady diary we know that the Dutch custom of serving plate size cookies and spiced wine, as well as offering pipes and tobacco at the time of a funeral, still continued until the mid-18th century. Recipes for kandeel, often anglicized to condale indicate that the custom of serving spiced wine mixed with eggs at the time of birth continued as well. Not only agricultural practices and horticultural introductions are attributable to the Dutch colonial past in America, but also doughnuts, coleslaw, waffles, wafers, pretzels, pancakes and above all cookies, to mention only a few examples. The Dutch touch left a lasting mark on the American kitchen.

MPL: Do you try to recreate the historical recipes that you discover? If so, are the recipes surprisingly good or do some disappoint?

PGR: Yes, I do try the recipes I find they work surprisingly well, providing you have enough knowledge of measures and are a reasonably experienced cook. In the case of 17th and 18th-century recipes, a good knowledge of hearth cooking comes into play as well. In general I would say that the recipes are delicious and some are outstanding!

MPL: What is the most fun aspect of being a food historian?

PGR: The most fun aspect of being a food historian is the constant discovery and the finding of little historical tidbits that help in rounding out the total picture. I hope to go on doing this and to go on giving talks because in the Q&A periods I always learn something new and that makes it exciting and great fun!

FC 67 Traditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter Rose

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Peter G. Rose, food historian and author of the book Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch.

Bio

Peter G. Rose was born in Utrecht, the Netherlands, and was educated there as well as in Switzerland. She came to the United States in the mid-1960s. She has worked as a Traditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter G. Rosefood writer and contributed a syndicated column on family food and cooking to the New York-based Gannett newspapers for more than twenty years. She has written articles for magazines such as Gourmet and Saveur, as well as for newspapers and magazines in the Netherlands, and locally for Hudson Valley Magazine and The Valley Table.

She started her research on the influence of the Dutch on the American kitchen in the early 1980s and published her first book on the subject,The Sensible Cook: Dutch Foodways in the Old and the New World, at the end of that decade. It was followed by Foods of the Hudson: A Seasonal Sampling of the Region’s Bounty (1993); and Matters of Taste: Food and Drink in Seventeenth-Century Dutch Art and Lifewith Dr. Donna R. Barnes (2002). More recently, she published Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch (2009) and Summer Pleasures, Winter Pleasures: a Hudson Valley Cookbook (2009). She is the 2002 recipient of the Alice P. Kenney Award for her research and writing on Dutch food history.

As a member of the Speakers in the Humanities program of the New York Council for the Humanities, she lectures on historic Dutch food ways all over New York State. She illustrates her talks with paintings of the Dutch Masters and has spoken at many museums with holdings of such Dutch art all around America. She lives with her husband, Don, in the beautiful, historic Hudson Valley of New York.

You can learn more about Peter at her website as well as check out her upcoming appearance schedule.

Book Summary

In 1609, Henry Hudson, under contract with the Dutch East India Company, set out to discover the lucrative Northwest Passage. The Hudson River Valley is what he discovered instead, and along its banks Dutch culture took hold. While the Dutch influence can still be seen in local architecture and customs, it is food and drink that Peter Rose has made her life’s work. From beer to bread and cookies to coleslaw, “Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch” is a comprehensive look at this important early American influence, complete with recipes to try.

Book InfoTraditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter G. Rose

Title: Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch

Publisher: The History Press (2009)

Trade paperback; 157 pages with bibliography, index and some BxW photos and illustrations.

Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we talk about the traditions of The Netherlands and how they were brought to New Netherland in America. Our discussion focuses predominantly on the Hudson Valley area of New York. The mainstays of the Dutch diet included bread and beer and a favorite fondness for cookies and pastries. The Hudson Valley Dutch were in close proximity to Native American communities and the two cultures impacted each other’s food traditions.  Many Dutch foods worked their way into mainstream American culture such as doughnuts, waffles and cookies.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winners are:

  • Geri Neumann of New York
  • Mary Perra of New York

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 067)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 63 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 66 A Discussion with Elizabeth Shown Mills

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Elizabeth Shown Mills, best known as the author of Evidence Explained. In this episode we will be having a discussion on slavery, race, research and writing centered on her two books, Isle of Canes and The Forgotten People which both focus on Cane River’s Creoles of Color.

Bio

Elizabeth Shown Mills is an internationally acclaimed historical researcher and writer who has spent her life studying American culture and the relationships between people–Elizabeth Shown Mills on Fieldstone Commonemotional as well as genetic. Featured on BBC, CNN, PBS, and other networks in the U.S., U.K., and Australia, she has been widely cited as “the genealogist who has had the most influence in the post-Roots era.”

Her 13 prize-winning books range from reference works such as Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace to the historical novel, Isle of Canes, which chronicles a family of freed slaves across four generations, and is drawn from Mills’s own research in the archives of six nations. She is also the editor of Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians.

In 2011, Elizabeth Shown Mills launched an academic website called Historic Pathways that houses digitized versions of articles she has published. The site broadcasts her fascinating and important work to a worldwide audience.

You can also follow Elizabeth on the Evidence Explained Facebook page and the Evidence Explained website.

Book Summary

Isle of Canes and The Forgotten People both focus on the Cane River’s Creoles of Color. The Isle of Canes is a fictional account and The Forgotten People is an academic work of non-fiction. Both provide and exceptional view into the lives and culture of the Creole people of Louisiana.

Book Info – The Forgotten PeopleThe Forgotten People by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Title: The Forgotten People: Cane River’s Creoles of Color

Publisher: Louisiana State University Press (Nov. 2013)

Trade paperback; 416 pages with bibliography, index, end notes and a photo essay.

The Forgotten People is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Book Info – Isle of CanesIsle of Canes by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Title: Isle of Canes

Publisher: Turner Publishing (2006)

Trade paperback; 583 pages.

Isle of Canes is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we get into a discussion about the complexity of slavery, race, religion and culture and then segue that into a discussion about research and writing.

Prize Winners

Five books by Elizabeth Shown Mills were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the publishers – Turner Publishing, The Louisiana State University Press and the Genealogical Publishing Company.

The winners are:

The Forgotten People – Brenda Lybbert of Washington

Isle Canes – Lori Lynn Price of Massachusetts

Evidence Explained (3 winners)

  • Libbi Crowe of Florida
  • Crystal Cuelho of California
  • Bill Nelson of Massachusetts

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to Turner Publishing, The Louisiana State University Press and the Genealogical Publishing Company for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 66)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 63 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Christmas (& Evidence Explained) is coming early this year!

What could be better than hearing Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, FASG on Fieldstone Common?  Hearing Elizabeth Shown Mills and winning one of her books!

The Give-away

This week I will be giving away FIVE books by Elizabeth Shown Mills:

How to win

In order to win any of the books you must already be signed up for the Fieldstone Common Bonus List (the mailing list).  It just takes a second – sign up here. You can submit entries for all three books (though you’ll only win one) if you like just fulfill the individual requirements (below) for the books. All submissions must be completed by 5pm EST on Wednesday, November 20, 2013.

The Isle of Canes and The Forgotten People

Elizabeth Shown Mills

To win the single copy of either Isle of Canes or The Forgotten People send me an email through the contact form about why you would like to win one of these books.

Evidence Explained

Evidence Explained by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Evidence Explained sells for $56 on Amazon.com.  I’d like to give the books out to people who don’t already have a copy of it so I won’t be picking randomly from the mailing list.

To win one of the three copies of Evidence Explained (after you’ve signed up for the Bonus List) you can do one of three things:

  1. Leave a rating & review on the Fieldstone Common iTunes page (if you use a pseudonym on iTunes be sure to email with your name so I know who left the review!)
  2. Tweet about the Interview and the interview link from your twitter account.  (You can use this link: http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/elizabeth-shown-mills-thursday/ Of course you can shorten it!). Please copy @FieldstoneComm on your tweet.
  3. Share the interview link (see above) from your Facebook or Google+ page. I’m not sure how I will know if you’ve posted to Facebook unless you friend me but we will figure it out.

Preference will be given to those who leave ratings on iTunes!

Enjoy! I am going to have so much fun giving these books out!

 

 

Elizabeth Shown Mills – this Thursday!

Elizabeth Shown Mills on Fieldstone CommonWhen was the last time you heard Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, FASG in an interview available to everyone across the internet? She has been a regular at the Institute of Genealogy & Historical Research at Samford as well as a speaker at national genealogy conferences but otherwise she partakes less frequently in public appearances or interviews.

You’ll have the opportunity this Thursday (November 21, 2013) in an interview right here on Fieldstone Common.

Our discussion will focus on taking your underlying research and applying that to your writing projects.  We are going to frame the discussion in a historical comparison of Northeast slavery with slavery in Louisiana.  Then we will take a closer look at her two books, Isle of Canes (a novel) and The Forgotten People: Cane River’s Creoles of Color (a non-fiction work) that are based on the same research. This will help us segue into how the same research can be applied to multiple projects to achieve your writing goals.

It’s going to be a tremendous discussion so be sure to reserve some time to listen in.  The interview will be available Thursday morning by 6:00am EST.  You can listen by coming back here to the website or by tuning in on iTunes or Stitcher (for Android).

Direct link to this post: http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com/elizabeth-shown-mills-thursday/

 

 

 

FC 65 A Little Commonwealth with John Demos

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Professor John Demos, author of the books The Unredeemed Captive; Entertaining Satan; and A Little Commonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony. In this episode we discuss these books as well as his career and the state of history in America.

Bio

John Demos was born and raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He graduated from A Little Commonwealth with John Demos on Fieldstone CommonHarvard College, and received his graduate training at Oxford, the University of California at Berkeley, and Harvard. He has taught at Brandeis and at Yale, where he is the Samuel Knight Professor Emeritus of American History. Some of his books include A Little Commonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony, Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England, for which he received the 1983 Bancroft Prize, and Past, Present, and Personal: The Family and the Life Course in American History. Demos’ The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America received the National Book Award in 1994. More recently he published Circles and Lines: The Shape of Life in Early America.

Book Summaries

Professor John Demos is an expert in early American history. His book A Little The Unredeemed Captive by John DemosCommonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony recreates the life and family structures of members of Plymouth colony in the 17th century. In Entertaining Satan Demos provides an overview of witchcraft in New England in the 17th and 18th centuries. His work The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America focuses on the 1704 Indian raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts. The book describes the taking of the Williams family and the choice of daughter Eunice to remain among the Mohawk community.

Book Info

Books by John Demos:

The Interview

In this interview we discuss how John Demos came to be a history professor and the influence of his years in the Peace Corps in Ghana, West Africa. We talk about the influence of his book as well as those of three colleagues Ken Lockridge, Philip Greven, and Michael Zuckerman who all wrote seminal New England town studies in the early 1970s which changed the focus of Early American history.

We discussed three of his books – A Little Commonwealth, The Unredeemed Captive and Entertaining Satan and the influences they had on interpreting Early American history. Demos credits Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum for their theory of explaining the Salem Witch Trials on an economic basis in their book Salem Possessed.

His later research into witchcraft was metaphorical as exemplified by the play The Crucible by Arthur Miller.

John has grown to love material culture and that has manifested in his passion for collecting antiques.

He has had a great influence on a generation of new writer-historians including Jill Lepore, Allegra di Bonaventura, Jack Larkin, Jane Kamensky, Wendy Warren, Peter Silver and many more.

In early 2014 be on the lookout for his next book The Heathen School (Knopf, 2014).

Bonus List

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 65)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 65 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 64 Artful and Designing Men – A look at Shays’ Rebellion with Gary Shattuck

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Gary Shattuck, author of the book Artful and Designing Men: The Trials of Job Shattuck and the Regulation of 1786-1787. This book explores the topic of Shays’ Rebellion, an uprising of farmers in Massachusetts, that protested unfair tax collection in the economically unstable times following the Revolutionary War.

Bio

Gary Shattuck is a native of Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up on the west coast and Artful and Designing Men with Gary Shattuck on Fieldstone Commongraduated from the University of Colorado with a degree in Anthropology. That’s where he met his wife of forty-one years and they now reside in Vermont. He is a magna cum laude graduate of the Vermont Law School, and is currently pursuing a Masters degree in Military History, concentrating on the Revolutionary War.

He served thirty-five years in the law enforcement community as a supervisor with the Vermont State Police, an Assistant Attorney General for the State of Vermont prosecuting cases for the Drug Task Force, and then with the United States Department of Justice as an Assistant United States Attorney in the District of Vermont working on guns, drugs, and organized crime matters. Following the events of 9/11, he was named anti-terrorism coordinator for the district. He has also served in Kosovo and Iraq working to re-establish their court systems following those particular conflicts. He retired from the department in 2006.

Gary has just completed his second book concerning the devastating effects of Jefferson’s Embargo of 1807 on those living in northern Vermont and which resulted in the murders of three individuals, including two government officials, in the summer of 1808. It will be released in 2014.

You can find more information at the Artful and Designing Men website page and you can follow Gary on his Facebook page.

Book Summary

It is not often that descriptions of historical events can be rewritten absent compelling evidence that those past accounts were somehow in error. But that is precisely the result when new-found court documents, presumed to not even exist, shed surprising new light on the involvement of Capt. Job Shattuck, one of the principal leaders in the event history has come to call Shays’ Rebellion. In Artful and Designing Men: The Trials of Job Shattuck and the Regulation of 1786-1787, Gary Shattuck (half-nephew, seven generations removed) delves deeply into the significant contributions made by this charismatic and well-respected veteran of the Seven Years’ War, the Revolutionary War, and community member as he transitioned from peaceful town father to protest leader. Tried and sentenced to death for high treason, shocking new information provided during his trial now forces a reassessment of this honorable man’s actions, resulting in the deserved rehabilitation of a reputation that history has denied until now.

Book Info Artful and Designing Men with Gary Shattuck on Fieldstone Common

Title: Artful and Designing Men: The Trials of Job Shattuck and the Regulation of 1786-1787

Publisher: Tate Publishing (2013)

Trade paperback; 411 pages with bibliography, index, end notes and a center color insert section.

Artful and Designing Men is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we discuss how this book came to be – when no records were supposed to exist – and yet Gary Shattuck found them. Those records, court documents, were resting quietly for years at the Massachusetts Historical Society waiting to be found. The documents redefined Shays’ rebellion and Job Shattuck participation in the event.

The story also follows the parallel lives of the Shattuck and Prescott families starting in the 1600s and becoming quite dramatic as the families take opposite sides in Shays’ Rebellion.

This interview will not only explain what Shays’ Rebellion is but will clarify its importance in the development of the constitution and the way the elite interacted with the populace as the United States slowly became an independent country.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Artful and Designing Men were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Tate Publishing.

The winners are:

  • Peter Godenschwager of Ohio
  • Sue Schlichting of Kansas

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the Tate Publishing for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher.  Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 64)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 63 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.