The Philadelphia Nativist Riots with Kenneth Milano

The Philadelphia Nativist Riots with Kenneth Milano on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 19 September 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Kenneth Milano, author of The Philadelphia Nativist Riots.

The outskirts of Philadelphia seethed with tension in the spring of 1844. By May 6, the situation between the newly arrived Irish Catholics and members of the anti-immigrant Nativist Party took an explosively violent turn. When the Irish asked to have their children excused from reading the Protestant version of the Bible in local public schools, the nativists held a protest. The Irish pushed back. For three days, riots scorched the streets of Kensington. Though the immigrants first had the upper hand, the nativists soon put the community to the torch. Those who fled were shot. Two Catholic churches burned to the ground, along with several blocks of houses, stores, a nunnery and a Catholic school. Local historian Kenneth W. Milano traces this tumultuous history from the preceding hostilities through the bloody skirmishes and finally to the aftermath of arrests and trials. Discover a remarkably intimate and compelling view of the riots with stories of individuals on both sides of the conflict that rocked Kensington.

The Philadelphia Nativist Riots with Kenneth Milano on Fieldstone CommonKenneth W. Milano is a historical & genealogical researcher. He was born and raised in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Milano received his degree in History from Temple University. His 2006-2011 column “The Rest is History” is well remembered by readers of Star Newspapers. He is one of the founders of the Kensington History Project.

 

Show Notes: Rebels at the Bar with Jill Norgren

Rebels at the Bar with Jill Norgren on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 5 September 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Jill Norgren about her book Rebels at the Bar: The fascinating, forgotten stories of America’s First Women Lawyers.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Rebels at the Bar: The fascinating, forgotten stories of America’s First Women Lawyers, published by the New York University Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Jill NorgrenRebels at the Bar details the history of American’s first women lawyers. Some of the names may be well-known such as Belva Lockwood or Myra Bradwell but most of the names will be new to the reader.  Regardless, all of these pioneering women in the field of law shared a determination and commitment at a time when women were expected to stay home and tend to the family. The courage of these women helped clear the path for all women wanting to work outside the home.

In addition to Rebels at the Bar, Jill Norgren has written:

The New York University Press, the publisher of Rebels at the Bar, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Arizona and Missouri. A big thank you to the New York University Press for their generosity.

Rebels at the Bar with Jill Norgren

LIVE: THURSDAY, 5 September 2013 at 1:00pm EDTRebels at the Bar with Jill Norgren on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Jill Norgren about her book Rebels at the Bar.

In Rebels at the Bar, prize-winning legal historian Jill Norgren recounts the life stories of a small group of nineteenth century women who were among the first female attorneys in the United States. Beginning in the late 1860s, these determined rebels pursued the radical ambition of entering the then all-male profession of law. They were motivated by a love of learning. They believed in fair play and equal opportunity. They desired recognition as professionals and the ability to earn a good living.

Through a biographical approach, Norgren presents the common struggles of eight women first to train and to qualify as attorneys, then to practice their hard-won professional privilege. Their story is one of nerve, frustration, and courage. This first generation practiced civil and criminal law, solo and in partnership. The women wrote extensively and lobbied on the major issues of the day, but the professional opportunities open to them had limits. They never had the opportunity to wear the black robes of a judge. They were refused entry into the lucrative practices of corporate and railroad law. Although male lawyers filled legislatures and the Foreign Service, presidents refused to appoint these early women lawyers to diplomatic offices and the public refused to elect them to legislatures.

Rebels at the Bar expands our understanding of both women’s rights and the history of the legal profession in the nineteenth century. It focuses on the female renegades who trained in law and then, like men, fought considerable odds to create successful professional Jill Norgrenlives. In this engaging and beautifully written book, Norgren shares her subjects’ faith in the art of the possible. In so doing, she ensures their place in history.

Jill Norgren is Professor Emerita of Political Science at John Jay College, and the Graduate Center of The City University of New York. She is the award winning author of many articles and books, including Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President (NYU Press, 2007); The Cherokee Cases; and American Cultural Pluralism and Law (with Serena Nanda).

 

Why Baseball Matters with Joanne Hulbert and David Lambert

Baseball Card - Library of CongressLIVE: THURSDAY, 15 August 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common we’re talking about America’s favorite past-time – Baseball! Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Joanne Hulbert and David Allen Lambert, two baseball historians who are passionate about the sport.

Did you know that baseball in America started before the Civil War? We’ll be talking about old-time baseball, how it caught on in the United States and why it is so important.

Joanne Hulbert is the author of Holliston, A Good Town. She is co-chair of the Society for American Baseball Research’s (SABR) Baseball and the Arts Committee and Joanne Hulbertco-chair of SABR’s Boston Chapter group. She is the author of numerous historical baseball articles and player biographies. She resides in Mudville, a venerable, old neighborhood of Holliston, Massachusetts, a town rich in early baseball history. And, contrary to the popular presumption, there can be joy in Mudville.

David Allen Lambert is the Chief Genealogist for the New England Historic Genealogical Society, and has served on the staff since 1993. His interest in genealogy started at the David Allen Lambertyoung age of seven, and has increased over the past four decades. He has published various articles in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register; the New Hampshire Genealogical Record, Rhode Island Roots, The Mayflower Descendant, and American Ancestors magazine. He is the author of A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries, and four other titles.

 

 

 

Show Notes: Margaret Fuller with Megan Marshall

Margaret Fuller: A New American life with Megan Marshall on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the18 July 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Megan Marshall about her book Margaret Fuller: A New American Life.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Margaret Fuller: A New American Life, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

You can learn more about Megan Marshall at her website.

In addition to Margaret Fuller, Megan Marshall has written The Peabody Sisters: Three Women Who Ignited American Romanticism.

Margaret Fuller was one of the most extraordinary forward-thinking women of the the 19th century. She was an early supporter of women’s right and a member of the famous transcendalists that included the likes of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thorough. She edited the transcendalist publication The Dial, she was a published writer and she was a foreign correspondent in Italy for Horace Greeley’s The Tribune. She died tragically in 1850 at ago 40 in a ship wreck.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, the publisher of Margaret Fuller: A New American Life, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Michigan and California. A big thank you to the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for their generosity.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History BookHeirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Here is Where with Andrew Carroll

Here is Where with Andrew Carroll on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 11 July 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Andrew Carroll, author of Here is Where: Discovering America’s Great Forgotten History.

Here Is Where chronicles Andrew Carroll’s eye-opening – and at times hilarious — journey across America to find and explore unmarked historic sites where extraordinary moments occurred and remarkable individuals once lived. Sparking the idea for this book was Carroll’s visit to the spot where Abraham Lincoln’s son was saved by the brother of Lincoln’s assassin. Carroll wondered, How many other unmarked places are there where intriguing events have unfolded and that we walk past every day, not realizing their significance? To answer that question, Carroll ultimately trekked to every region of the country — by car, train, plane, helicopter, bus, bike, and kayak and on foot. Among the things he learned:

*Where in North America the oldest sample of human DNA was discovered

* Where America’s deadliest maritime disaster took place, a calamity worse than the fate of the Titanic

*Which virtually unknown American scientist saved hundreds of millions of lives

*How a 14-year-old farm boy’s brainstorm led to the creation of television

Andrew Carroll on Fieldstone Common

Andrew Carroll
Photo credit: Chris Carroll

Here Is Where is thoroughly entertaining, but it’s also a profound reminder that the places we pass by often harbor amazing secrets and that there are countless other astonishing stories still out there, waiting to be found.

Andrew Carroll is the editor of several New York Times bestsellers, including Letters of a Nation, Behind the Lines, and War Letters, which inspired an acclaimed PBS documentary. Carroll’s book Operation Homecoming was the inspiration for an Oscar-nominated and Emmy-winning film.

 

 

 

Show Notes: Marmee & Louisa with Eve LaPlante

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 13 December 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with Eve LaPlante, author of Marmee & Louisa: The Untold Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Mother.


The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

The companion book for Marmee & Louisa is called My Heart is Boundless which includes original, previously unpublished writings on Abigail May Alcott.

You can learn more about Eve LaPlante from her web page.

Watch a 3-minute video about Marmee & Louisa. 

Following are specific notes from the discussion:

Fruitlands is the location of the utopian community started by Bronson Alcott. It is open all years for visitors but has limited hours during the winter so be sure to check the Fruitlands website before making a visit.

Orchard House is the Alcott home in Concord, Massachusetts where Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women, the story which made her the most successful author of the 19th century.
You can learn more about Louisa May Alcott from the following Sources:

The Louisa May Alcott is My Passion blog

The Louisa May Alcott Society

The 24th annual American Literature Association Annual Conference will be held May 23-26, 2013 at the Westin Copley Place in Boston, Massachusetts. The even will feature sessions on Louisa May Alcott.

Free Press, a division of Simon and Schuster, the publisher of Marmee & Louisa and My Heart is Boundless, donated two copies of the Marmee & Louisa that were given as a “door prizes” during the live show. One copy went to a listener in Pennsylvania and the other to a listener in Arizona. A big thank you to the Free Press for  their generosity!

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Megan donated two copies of her book, Hey, America, Your Roots Are Showing which were won by Fieldstone Common listeners in Pennsylvania and Arizona.  Thank you Megan for your generous donation!

The Heirloom RegistryFieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.


Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Marmee & Louisa with Eve LaPlante

LIVE: THURSDAY, 13 December 2012 at 1:00pm EST

This week on Fieldstone Common host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to Eve LaPlante, author of Marmee & Louisa: The Untold Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Mother.

Louisa May Alcott was one of the most successful and bestselling authors of her day, earning more than any of her male contemporaries. Her classic Little Women has been a mainstay of American literature since its release nearly 150 years ago, as Jo March and her calm, beloved “Marmee” have shaped and inspired generations of young women. Biographers have consistently attributed Louisa’s uncommon success to her father, Bronson Alcott, assuming that this outspoken idealist was the source of his daughter’s progressive thinking and remarkable independence.

But in this riveting dual biography, award-winning biographer Eve LaPlante explodes these myths, drawing from a trove of surprising new documents to show that it was Louisa’s actual “Marmee,” Abigail May Alcott, who formed the intellectual and emotional center of her world. Abigail, whose difficult life both inspired and served as a warning to her devoted daughters, pushed Louisa to excel at writing and to chase her unconventional dreams in a male-dominated world.

 In this groundbreaking work, LaPlante paints an exquisitely moving and utterly convincing portrait of a woman decades ahead of her time, and the fiercely independent daughter whose life was deeply entwined with her mother’s dreams of freedom. This gorgeously written story of two extraordinary women is guaranteed to transform our view of one of America’s most beloved authors.

Eve LaPlante, author of Marmee & Louisa

Eve LaPlante is a great niece and a first cousin of Abigail and Louisa May Alcott. She is the author of Seized, American Jezebel, and Salem Witch Judge, the winner of the 2008 Massachusetts Book Award for Nonfiction. She is also the editor of a collection of Abigail May Alcott’s private papers. She lives with her family in New England.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – The Poorhouses of Mass. with Heli Meltsner

Heli Meltsner author of The Poorhouses of Massachusetts on Fieldstone Common

Heli Meltsner author of The Poorhouses of Massachusetts

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 15 November 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with Heli Meltsner, author of The Poorhouses of Massachusetts.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

A Special Chance to  Win

Books were not given out during the live airing of the interview. Fieldstone Common, however, is giving out 2 copies of The Poorhouses of Massachusetts in a pre-Thanksgiving giveaway on the blog. See this post for all the details. You have between now and Wednesday, Nov. 21st at 6pm EST to enter the giveaway.

Heli Meltsner is a board member and curator with the Cambridge Historical Society.  Feel free to contact Heli through the society. The Cambridge Historical Society is a very active dynamic group. They have a Facebook page that is updated nearly daily. During the interview Heli mentioned that the society is working on a book about the Cambridge Historical Commission’s 50 years of service to the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts. We will look forward to seeing that published in November 2013.

The Poorhouses of Massachusetts was published by McFarland & Company, Inc. Publishers and copies are available for sale through Amazon.com and other booksellers.
 
Some of the concepts of poor law (ie settlement law) that were discussed in the interview include:

  • Warning outs
  • Towns suing other towns for support
  • Indentured servitude for both children and adults
  • Vendue – selling the poor to the lowest bidder

In Massachusetts many records about the poor can be found at the town level in town record books or in town reports. For states outside of New England you should probably check county-level records.

To receive your free Thanksgiving Gift from Houstory, follow this link and add the registration number to your cart. At checkout, simply type in “TURKEYDAYGIFT” in the coupon code box. Your permanent registration code will be emailed to you. The special offer for a FREE Heirloom Registry runs now through Thanksgiving Day. More details are available here.

Fieldstone listeners can also take 15 percent off the purchase of your entire order, including registry stickers and brass plates — which make attaching a registration number to your heirlooms even easier — by using the coupon code “FIELDSTONE.”

McFarland & Company, Inc. Publishers, the publisher of The Poorhouses of Massachusetts, donated two copies of the book that are being given as a “door prizes”. See this post for how you can win one of the books (ends Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2012) . A big thank you to McFarland & Company, Inc. Publishers for  their generosity!

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

The Poorhouses of Massachusetts with Heli Meltsner

LIVE: THURSDAY, 15 November 2012 at 1:00pm EST

Listen in to Fieldstone Common this week as host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to Heli Meltsner, author of The Poorhouses of Massachusetts.

Ever since the English settled in America, extreme poverty and the inability of individuals to support themselves and their families have been persistent problems. In the early nineteenth century, many communities established almshouses, or “poorhouses,” in a valiant but ultimately failed attempt to assist the destitute, including the sick, elderly, unemployed, mentally ill and orphaned, as well as unwed mothers, petty criminals and alcoholics.

This work details the rise and decline of poorhouses in Massachusetts, painting a portrait of life inside these institutions and revealing a history of constant political and social turmoil over issues that dominate the conversation about welfare recipients even today. The first study to address the role of architecture in shaping as well as reflecting the treatment of paupers, it also provides photographs and histories of dozens of former poorhouses across the state, many of which still stand.

Heli Meltsner, the curator of the Cambridge Historical Society, has been a town planner and a preservation consultant, undertaking numerous nominations to the National Register of Historic Places and historic resource inventories for municipalities and state agencies. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis