FC 83 – Rebecca Dickinson with Marla R. Miller

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Marla R. Miller, author of the book Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman.

Bio – Marla R. Miller

Marla R. Miller, a historian of early American women and work, has made a career uncovering the lives of women who left little in the way of documentary record. She is a professor of Marla Miller on Fieldstone Commonhistory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and directs the Public History program there. She has won the Organization of American Historians’ Lerner-Scott Prize for the best dissertation on women’s history and the 1997 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Colonial History.

This is Marla’s second visit to Fieldstone Common. She appeared on the July 4th, 2013 episode to talk about her other book, Betsy Ross and the Making of America.

Book Summary

Rebecca Dickinson’s powerful voice, captured through excerpts from the pages of her journal, allows colonial and revolutionary-era New England to come alive. Dickinson’s life illustrates the dilemmas faced by many Americans in the decades before, during, and after the American Revolution, as well as the paradoxes presented by an unmarried woman who earned her own living and made her own way in the small town where she was born. Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman, uses Dickinson’s world as a lens to introduce readers to the everyday experience of living in the colonial era and the social, cultural, and economic challenges faced in the transformative decades surrounding the American Revolution.

Publication InfoRebecca Dickinson with Marla Miller on Fieldstone Common

Title: Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman

Publisher: Westview Press (2014)

Trade Paperback; 194 pages with a list or primary sources, end notes, bibliographic essay and an index.

Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

Marla and I talk about the diary that acted as the background for Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman. Rebecca lived through American Revolution to see the birth of the United States. She remained unmarried and supported herself independently as a gown maker. Though she had several proposals of marriage she rejected them. Her life was a careful balance of conscious independence and loneliness.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Womanwas given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Westview Press.

The winner is:

  • Debra Cravens of Wisconsin

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Westview Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/rebecca-dickinson-marla-miller

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 83)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 83 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 061 Hanging Ruth Blay with Carolyn Marvin

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Carolyn Marvin, author of the book Hanging Ruth Blay: An Eighteenth-Century New Hampshire Tragedy.

Bio

Carolyn Marvin currently works as a research librarian at the Portsmouth Athenaeum in Hanging Ruth Blay with Carolyn Marvin on Fieldstone CommonPortsmouth, New Hampshire. Previously, she worked in both public and school libraries. Ms. Marvin lives in a tiny ivy-covered brick house in Portsmouth with her granddaughter, three cats, Dante the Westie, and lots of fish.

Book Summary

On a cold December morning in 1768, thirty-one-year-old Ruth Blay approached the gallows erected for her execution. Standing on the high ground in the northwest corner of what is now Portsmouth’s old South Cemetery, she would have had a clear view across the pasture to the harbor and open sea. The eighteenth-century hanging of a schoolteacher for concealing the birth of a child out of wedlock has appeared in local legend over the last few centuries, but the full account of Ruth’s story has never been told. Drawing on over two years of investigative research, author Carolyn Marvin brings to light the dramatic details of Ruth’s life and the cruel injustice of colonial Portsmouth’s moral code. As Marvin uncovers the real flesh-and-blood woman who suffered the ultimate punishment, her readers come to understand Ruth as an individual and a woman of her time.

Hanging Ruth Blay with Carolyn Marvin on Fieldstone CommonBook Info

Title: Hanging Ruth Blay: An Eighteenth-Century New Hampshire Tragedy

Publisher: The History Press (2010)

Trade paperback; 125 pages with end notes, bibliography and some BxW photos and illustrations.

Hanging Ruth Blay: An Eighteenth-Century New Hampshire Tragedy is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we explore the difficult situation of out of wedlock births and the legal and moral ramifications they had in society. Ruth Blay was ultimately hanged for concealing the birth of a bastard child though she was not convicted of infanticide. There are very fine lines drawn between what an 18th century woman is expected to do at the time of birth and what can land her in trouble with the courts. While we may never know why she behaved the way she did, we do have Ruth’s poignant confession where she is defiant and defending her innocence to the last.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Hanging Ruth Blay were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the the History Press.

The winners are:

  • Clare Gunning of New York
  • Annemare Taylor of Massachusetts

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the History Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 061)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 61 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Show Notes: Rebels at the Bar with Jill Norgren

Rebels at the Bar with Jill Norgren on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 5 September 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Jill Norgren about her book Rebels at the Bar: The fascinating, forgotten stories of America’s First Women Lawyers.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Rebels at the Bar: The fascinating, forgotten stories of America’s First Women Lawyers, published by the New York University Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Jill NorgrenRebels at the Bar details the history of American’s first women lawyers. Some of the names may be well-known such as Belva Lockwood or Myra Bradwell but most of the names will be new to the reader.  Regardless, all of these pioneering women in the field of law shared a determination and commitment at a time when women were expected to stay home and tend to the family. The courage of these women helped clear the path for all women wanting to work outside the home.

In addition to Rebels at the Bar, Jill Norgren has written:

The New York University Press, the publisher of Rebels at the Bar, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Arizona and Missouri. A big thank you to the New York University Press for their generosity.

Rebels at the Bar with Jill Norgren

LIVE: THURSDAY, 5 September 2013 at 1:00pm EDTRebels at the Bar with Jill Norgren on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Jill Norgren about her book Rebels at the Bar.

In Rebels at the Bar, prize-winning legal historian Jill Norgren recounts the life stories of a small group of nineteenth century women who were among the first female attorneys in the United States. Beginning in the late 1860s, these determined rebels pursued the radical ambition of entering the then all-male profession of law. They were motivated by a love of learning. They believed in fair play and equal opportunity. They desired recognition as professionals and the ability to earn a good living.

Through a biographical approach, Norgren presents the common struggles of eight women first to train and to qualify as attorneys, then to practice their hard-won professional privilege. Their story is one of nerve, frustration, and courage. This first generation practiced civil and criminal law, solo and in partnership. The women wrote extensively and lobbied on the major issues of the day, but the professional opportunities open to them had limits. They never had the opportunity to wear the black robes of a judge. They were refused entry into the lucrative practices of corporate and railroad law. Although male lawyers filled legislatures and the Foreign Service, presidents refused to appoint these early women lawyers to diplomatic offices and the public refused to elect them to legislatures.

Rebels at the Bar expands our understanding of both women’s rights and the history of the legal profession in the nineteenth century. It focuses on the female renegades who trained in law and then, like men, fought considerable odds to create successful professional Jill Norgrenlives. In this engaging and beautifully written book, Norgren shares her subjects’ faith in the art of the possible. In so doing, she ensures their place in history.

Jill Norgren is Professor Emerita of Political Science at John Jay College, and the Graduate Center of The City University of New York. She is the award winning author of many articles and books, including Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President (NYU Press, 2007); The Cherokee Cases; and American Cultural Pluralism and Law (with Serena Nanda).

 

Show Notes – Defiant Brides with Nancy Rubin Stuart

ShowPhoto-RubinStuart-1Following are some items that were mentioned during the 30 May 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Nancy Rubin Stuart about her book Defiant Brides: The Untold Story of Two Revolutionary-era Women and the Radical Men They Married.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Defiant Brides: The Untold Story of Two Revolutionary-era Women and the Radical Men They Married, published by Beacon Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Nancy Rubin Stuart is the author of seven books:

ShowPhoto-RubinStuart-2You can learn more about Nancy Rubin Stuart at her website. You can also follow her on Facebook and on Twitter.

In addition to authoring books Nancy is the Executive Director of the Cape Cod (Massachusetts) Writers Center. The Cape Cod Writers Center holds and annual conference each August.

Defiant Brides: The Untold Story of Two Revolutionary-era Women and the Radical Men They Married is a dual biography that traces the lives of Lucy Flucker Knox who married Revolutionary War Patriot Henry Knox and Peggy Shippen Arnold who married Revolutionary War traitor, Benedict Arnold.

Beacon Press, the publisher of Defiant Brides donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Kentucky and Missouri. A big thank you to the Beacon Press for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

You can read the full story of the cookbook (as mentioned during the show) — and see pictures of Gommy in her Lopez garden and even a link to one of her recipes — on the Heirloom Registry’s blog.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Defiant Brides with Nancy Rubin Stuart

ShowPhoto-RubinStuart-1LIVE: THURSDAY, 30 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Nancy Rubin Stuart, author of Defiant Brides: The Untold Story of Two Revolutionary-Era Women and the Radical Men They Married.

Esteemed biographer Nancy Rubin Stuart takes a close look at the lives of Lucy Flucker Knox and Peggy Shippen Arnold to reveal that neither was simply a “traitor” or “patriot.” In Defiant Brides, the first dual biography of both Peggy Shippen Arnold and Lucy Flucker Knox, Stuart has crafted a rich portrait of two rebellious women who defied expectations and struggled—publicly and privately—in a volatile political moment in early America.

Drawing from never-before-published correspondence, Stuart traces the evolution of these women from passionate teenage brides to mature matrons, bringing both women from the sidelines of history to its vital center. Readers will be enthralled by Stuart’s dramatic account of the epic lives of these defiant brides, which begin with romance, are complicated by politics, and involve spies, disappointments, heroic deeds, tragedies, and personal triumphs.

ShowPhoto-RubinStuart-2Nancy Rubin Stuart is an award-winning author specializing in women’s and social history. She has appeared on national television and NPR and has written for the New York Times, among other publications. Stuart is a board member of the Women Writing Women’s Lives Seminar at the CUNY Graduate Center and executive director of the Cape Cod Writers Center.

 

Show Notes – Judith Sargent Murray with Barbara Silberman

Barbara Silberman, President of the Sargent House Museum in Gloucester, MAFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 16 May 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Barbara Silberman about Judith Sargent Murray and the Sargent House Museum in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

This interview with Barbara Silberman, president of the Sargent House, details many of the accomplishments of Judith Sargent Murray’s life and showcases her intelligence, tenacity and enduring love for John Murray.

Judith Sargent Murray (1751-1820) was an 18th century essayist who believed in equal education, a woman’s right to work outside the home and equal roles between men and women in marriage. These were quite extraordinary beliefs to be espoused during that time period. As such she was an early advocate for women’s rights. Her second husband was John Murray (1741-1815), an Englishman who established the Universalist denomination in the United States.

The Sargent House where Judith spent her married life, is located in Gloucester, Massachusetts and is open as a house museum. The museum is open each year from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

Each May the Sargent House holds a free event called “Judith Speaks” where volunteers read the words of Judith Sargent that still resonate today. The event is a great introduction to the life and works of Judith Sargent Murray. Here is a video of the Judith Speaks event from 2012 (from the Cox Simoes YouTube page).

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

You can read the full story of the Grandfather Clock — which includes photos of the clock, his grandpa — and the actual thumbtacked note that inspired the Registry — on the Heirloom Registry’s blog.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Show Notes – One Colonial Woman’s World with Michelle Coughlin

One Woman's Colonial World with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 7 March 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin, author of One Colonial Woman’s World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

You can learn more about the book at the One Colonial Woman’s World website. The site also includes a list of appearance that Michelle Marchetti Coughlin will be making this year.

One Colonial Woman’s World, published by The University of Massachusetts Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

The Chandler family was originally from Roxbury, Massachusetts. In 1686 a number of Roxbury families including the Chandlers settled “New Roxbury” which later became Woodstock, Connecticut.

Mehetabel Chandler’s maternal side, the Douglases, settled in New London. Mehetabel married John Coit, also of New London, Connecticut.

During the week of the show it was discovered that Fieldstone Common host, Marian Pierre-Louis, is a descendant of Mehetabel Chandler Coit’s parents John Chandler and Elizabeth Douglas continuing down through the line of Mehetabel’s brother, John Chandler and his wife, Mary Raymond. Fieldstone Common listener Heather Rojo is also a descendant through Mehetabel’s sister, Hannah Chandler who married Moses Draper.

The University of Massachusetts Press, the publisher of One Colonial Woman’s World, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.  A big thank you to The University of Massachusetts Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

One Colonial Woman’s World with Michelle Coughlin

LIVE: THURSDAY, 7 March 2013 at 1:00pm ESTOne Woman's Colonial World with Michelle Marchetti Coulghlin on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Michelle Marchetti Coughlin, author of One Colonial Woman’s World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit.

One Colonial Woman’s World reconstructs the life of Mehetabel Chandler Coit (1673–1758), the author of what may be the earliest surviving diary by an American woman. A native of Roxbury, Massachusetts, who later moved to Connecticut, Mehetabel began her diary at the age of fifteen and kept it intermittently until she was well into her seventies. A previously overlooked resource, the diary contains entries on a broad range of topics as well as poems, recipes, folk and herbal medical remedies, religious meditations, financial accounts, and even some humor. An extensive collection of letters by Mehetabel and her female relatives has also survived, shedding further light on her experiences.

It is clear from the surviving writings that Mehetabel lived a rich and varied life, not only running a household and raising a family, but reading, writing, traveling, transacting business, and maintaining a widespread network of family, social, and commercial connections. While her experiences were circumscribed by gender norms of the day, she took a lively interest in the world around her and played an active role in her community.

Mehetabel’s long life covered an eventful period in American history, and this book explores the numerous—and sometimes surprising—ways in which her personal experiences were linked to broader social and political developments. It also provides One Woman's Colonial World with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin on Fieldstone Commoninsight into the lives of countless other colonial American women whose history remains largely untold.

Michelle Marchetti Coughlin is an independent scholar and former editor who holds graduate degrees in history and English and American Literature. She lives south of Boston with her husband Mark and is currently working on an article about Mehetabel’s mother’s poem.

For more details and upcoming schedule see: http://FieldstoneCommon.blogspot.com

 

Show Notes: Marmee & Louisa with Eve LaPlante

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 13 December 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with Eve LaPlante, author of Marmee & Louisa: The Untold Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Mother.


The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

The companion book for Marmee & Louisa is called My Heart is Boundless which includes original, previously unpublished writings on Abigail May Alcott.

You can learn more about Eve LaPlante from her web page.

Watch a 3-minute video about Marmee & Louisa. 

Following are specific notes from the discussion:

Fruitlands is the location of the utopian community started by Bronson Alcott. It is open all years for visitors but has limited hours during the winter so be sure to check the Fruitlands website before making a visit.

Orchard House is the Alcott home in Concord, Massachusetts where Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women, the story which made her the most successful author of the 19th century.
You can learn more about Louisa May Alcott from the following Sources:

The Louisa May Alcott is My Passion blog

The Louisa May Alcott Society

The 24th annual American Literature Association Annual Conference will be held May 23-26, 2013 at the Westin Copley Place in Boston, Massachusetts. The even will feature sessions on Louisa May Alcott.

Free Press, a division of Simon and Schuster, the publisher of Marmee & Louisa and My Heart is Boundless, donated two copies of the Marmee & Louisa that were given as a “door prizes” during the live show. One copy went to a listener in Pennsylvania and the other to a listener in Arizona. A big thank you to the Free Press for  their generosity!

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Megan donated two copies of her book, Hey, America, Your Roots Are Showing which were won by Fieldstone Common listeners in Pennsylvania and Arizona.  Thank you Megan for your generous donation!

The Heirloom RegistryFieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.


Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis