FC 79 The Underground Railroad on Long Island with Kathleen Velsor

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Kathleen G. Velsor, author of the book The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom.

Bio – Kathleen G. Velsor

Dr. Kathleen Gaffney Velsor is an associate professor in the School of Education at the State University of New York Old Westbury. She earned an undergraduate degree in fine The Underground Railroad on Long Island with Kathleen G. Velsor on Fieldsotne Commonarts and education from Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri, and received her master’s degree in educational administration from Lehigh University in Pennsylvania and her doctorate in educational research from the University of Cincinnati in Ohio. She has received numerous grants to research the Quaker involvement in the Underground Railroad on Long Island, most recent among them an education grant from the Long Island Community Foundation to establish the Underground Teaching Partnership to build community through interdisciplinary social studies workshops for schoolteachers.

Book Summary

From the arrival of the Quakers in the seventeenth century to the enforcement of the Emancipation Proclamation, Long Island played an important role in the Underground Railroad’s work to guide slaves to freedom. In Old Westbury, the Post family established a major stop on the freedom trail with the help of an escaped Virginia slave. In Jericho, families helped escaping slaves to freedom from the present-day Maine Maid Inn. Elias Hicks helped free 191 slaves himself and worked to create Underground Railroad safe houses in many northeastern cities. Some former slaves even established permanent communities across the island. Visit the safe houses many of which are still standing today and explore the journey of runaway slaves on Long Island.

Book InfoThe Underground Railroad on Long Island with Kathleen G. Velsor on Fieldsotne Common

Title: The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom

Publisher: The History Press (2013)

Trade Paperback; 144 pages; with end notes, bibliography, index and BxW photos & illustrations.

The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

During the interview Kathleen and I discussed the long involvement of Quakers on Long Island with the anti-slavery movement. Around the time of the American Revolution Quakers started to become uncomfortable with the idea of any human being held in bondage. In the Long Island area Quakers were lead with the strong Leadership of Elias Hicks who rallied other Quakers to join his anti-slavery cause.  His followers were called Hicksite Quakers. Hicksites first manumitted their own slaves. As time passed they developed the network of the Underground Railroad and worked toward helping enslaved people to freedom as well as educating them in reading and writing and providing a trade.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winners

One copy of The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom was given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winner is:

  • Vonda McCrae of Virginia

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/underground-railroad-kathleen-velsor/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 78)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 78 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 66 A Discussion with Elizabeth Shown Mills

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Elizabeth Shown Mills, best known as the author of Evidence Explained. In this episode we will be having a discussion on slavery, race, research and writing centered on her two books, Isle of Canes and The Forgotten People which both focus on Cane River’s Creoles of Color.

Bio

Elizabeth Shown Mills is an internationally acclaimed historical researcher and writer who has spent her life studying American culture and the relationships between people–Elizabeth Shown Mills on Fieldstone Commonemotional as well as genetic. Featured on BBC, CNN, PBS, and other networks in the U.S., U.K., and Australia, she has been widely cited as “the genealogist who has had the most influence in the post-Roots era.”

Her 13 prize-winning books range from reference works such as Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace to the historical novel, Isle of Canes, which chronicles a family of freed slaves across four generations, and is drawn from Mills’s own research in the archives of six nations. She is also the editor of Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians.

In 2011, Elizabeth Shown Mills launched an academic website called Historic Pathways that houses digitized versions of articles she has published. The site broadcasts her fascinating and important work to a worldwide audience.

You can also follow Elizabeth on the Evidence Explained Facebook page and the Evidence Explained website.

Book Summary

Isle of Canes and The Forgotten People both focus on the Cane River’s Creoles of Color. The Isle of Canes is a fictional account and The Forgotten People is an academic work of non-fiction. Both provide and exceptional view into the lives and culture of the Creole people of Louisiana.

Book Info – The Forgotten PeopleThe Forgotten People by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Title: The Forgotten People: Cane River’s Creoles of Color

Publisher: Louisiana State University Press (Nov. 2013)

Trade paperback; 416 pages with bibliography, index, end notes and a photo essay.

The Forgotten People is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Book Info – Isle of CanesIsle of Canes by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Title: Isle of Canes

Publisher: Turner Publishing (2006)

Trade paperback; 583 pages.

Isle of Canes is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we get into a discussion about the complexity of slavery, race, religion and culture and then segue that into a discussion about research and writing.

Prize Winners

Five books by Elizabeth Shown Mills were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the publishers – Turner Publishing, The Louisiana State University Press and the Genealogical Publishing Company.

The winners are:

The Forgotten People – Brenda Lybbert of Washington

Isle Canes – Lori Lynn Price of Massachusetts

Evidence Explained (3 winners)

  • Libbi Crowe of Florida
  • Crystal Cuelho of California
  • Bill Nelson of Massachusetts

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to Turner Publishing, The Louisiana State University Press and the Genealogical Publishing Company for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 66)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 63 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Elizabeth Shown Mills – this Thursday!

Elizabeth Shown Mills on Fieldstone CommonWhen was the last time you heard Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, FASG in an interview available to everyone across the internet? She has been a regular at the Institute of Genealogy & Historical Research at Samford as well as a speaker at national genealogy conferences but otherwise she partakes less frequently in public appearances or interviews.

You’ll have the opportunity this Thursday (November 21, 2013) in an interview right here on Fieldstone Common.

Our discussion will focus on taking your underlying research and applying that to your writing projects.  We are going to frame the discussion in a historical comparison of Northeast slavery with slavery in Louisiana.  Then we will take a closer look at her two books, Isle of Canes (a novel) and The Forgotten People: Cane River’s Creoles of Color (a non-fiction work) that are based on the same research. This will help us segue into how the same research can be applied to multiple projects to achieve your writing goals.

It’s going to be a tremendous discussion so be sure to reserve some time to listen in.  The interview will be available Thursday morning by 6:00am EST.  You can listen by coming back here to the website or by tuning in on iTunes or Stitcher (for Android).

Direct link to this post: http://www.FieldstoneCommon.com/elizabeth-shown-mills-thursday/

 

 

 

Show Notes – For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura

For Adam's Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 9 May 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Allegra di Bonaventura about her book For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England, published by Liveright Publishing, a division of WW Norton & Company is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The story of For Adam’s Sake revolves around five New London, Connecticut families across several generations in the 1600s and early 1700s.  The families include:

The John Jackson family. This includes his wife, Joan Jackson and their children (among them Adam) and Joan’s mother. They are a combination of enslaved and free African Americans.

The Joshua Hempstead family. It’s Joshua’s diary that forms the basis of the story. The diary has been published and is available for sale from the New London County Historical Society.

The Rogers family. The well to do family is headed by James Rogers but it is son John who is the focus of this story. John become the head of the Rogerenes sect of Adventists.

The Livingston family. Though a New York Anglo/Dutch, son John Livingston moves to New London, Connecticut and marries Fitz Winthrop’s daughter, Mary.

The Winthrop family. The story focuses on the families of Fitz and Waitstill Winthrop who are brothers and grandsons of John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Liveright Publishing, the publisher of For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Vermont and Missouri. A big thank you to the Liveright Publishing for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura

For Adam's Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura on Fieldstone Common For Adam's Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura photo by Andrew HoganLIVE: THURSDAY, 9 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Allega di Bonaventura, author of For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England.

In the tradition of Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s classic, A Midwife’s Tale, comes this groundbreaking narrative by one of America’s most promising colonial historians. Joshua Hempstead was a well-respected farmer and tradesman in New London, Connecticut. As his remarkable diary—kept from 1711 until 1758—reveals, he was also a slave owner who owned Adam Jackson for over thirty years. In this engrossing narrative of family life and the slave experience in the colonial North, Allegra di Bonaventura describes the complexity of this master/slave relationship and traces the intertwining stories of two families until the eve of the Revolution. Slavery is often left out of our collective memory of New England’s history, but it was hugely impactful on the central unit of colonial life: the family. In every corner, the lines between slavery and freedom were blurred as families across the social spectrum fought to survive. In this enlightening study, a new portrait of an era emerges.

Allegra di Bonaventura is an assistant dean at the Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in New Haven, Connecticut. Her dissertation was awarded the George Washington Egleston Prize.

Author photo by Andrew Hogan

 

Show Notes – Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 14 February 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with C.S. Manegold, author of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

You can learn more about C.S. Manegold  at her website as well as the site dedicated to to the book Ten Hills Farm.

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

Ten Hills Farm discusses the history of slavery in the north within the context of the property owners of farm through the centuries. The main characters discussed are Governor John Winthrop, Isaac Royall Sr. and Isaac Royall Jr.

The Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford, Massachusetts (a short drive from Boston) are owned and maintained by the Royall House Association. A great deal of information about the property and its history is available from the website. The property is open to the public between May and November. Check the website for details.

The book Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, published by Princeton University Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

C.S. Manegold is also the author of In Glory’s Shadow: The Citadel, Shannon Faulkner and a Changing Ameria.

During the show we discussed a conflict between Samuel Sewall and John Saffin over the issue of slavery (see pages 102-122 of Ten Hills Farm). One of the documents related to this disagreement, written by Sewall, is called “The Selling of Joseph” which can be viewed on the Massachusetts Historical Society website.

Princeton University Press, the publisher of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, donated a copy of the book which was given as “door prize” during the live show to a listener in Texas.  A big thank you to Princeton University Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site. 

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Ten Hills Farm with CS Manegold

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

LIVE: THURSDAY, 14 February 2013 at 1:00pm EST

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews CS Manegold, author of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North.

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

C.S. Manegold

Ten Hills Farm tells the powerful saga of five generations of slave owners in colonial New England. Settled in 1630 by John Winthrop–who would later become governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony–Ten Hills Farm was a six-hundred-acre estate just north of Boston. Winthrop, famous for envisioning his ‘city on the hill’ and lauded as a paragon of justice, owned slaves on that ground and passed the first law in North America condoning slavery.

In this mesmerizing narrative, C. S. Manegold exposes how the fates of the land and the families that lived on it were bound to America’s most tragic and tainted legacy. Challenging received ideas about America and the Atlantic world, Ten Hills Farm digs deep to bring the story of slavery in the North full circle–from concealment to recovery. Manegold follows the compelling tale from the early seventeenth to the early twenty-first century, from New England, through the South, to the sprawling slave plantations of the Caribbean.

C. S. Manegold is the author of In Glory’s Shadow: The Citadel, Shannon Faulkner, and a Changing America (Knopf). As a reporter with the New York Times, Newsweek, and the Philadelphia Inquirer, she received numerous national awards and was part of the New York Times team honored with a Pulitzer Prize in 1994.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis