FC 98 Lost Boston with Anthony Sammarco

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Anthony Sammarco, the author of the book Lost Boston.

Bio – Anthony Sammarco

Since 1997, Anthony Sammarco has taught history at the Urban College of Boston, and his course “Boston’s Immigrants” is based on his book of the same name to highlight the Lost Boston with Anthony Sammarco on Fieldstone Commoncity’s diversity. He was named educator of the year in 2003 and he serves on the UCB’s Leadership Council. Mr. Sammarco received the Bulfinch Award from the Doric Dames of the Massachusetts State House and the Washington Medal from the Freedom Foundation and was named Dorchester town historian by Raymond L. Flynn, mayor of Boston. He was elected a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is a member of the Boston Author’s Club and is a proprietor of the Boston Athenaeum. In his volunteer work, he is treasurer of the Victorian Society, New England Chapter, and a trustee of the Forest Hills Cemetery Educational Trust. He is past president of the Bay State Historical League and the Dorchester Historical Society. He lives in Boston and in Osterville on Cape Cod.

Book Summary

A nostalgic journey back in time to visit some of the disappeared buildings and places in all their grandeur, before the wrecking ball and decline set in.

From the 1850s up to the present day, 68 different losses are represented here, including schools, churches, theaters, grand mansions, dockyards, racetracks, parks, stores, hotels, offices, and factories. Organized chronologically starting with the earliest losses and ending with the latest, the book features much-loved insitutions that failed to stand the test of time, along with old-fashioned hotels and sports facilities that were beyond updating or refurbishment. Losses include Franklin Place, Boston City Hall, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Hancock House, Gleason’s Publishing Hall, Fort Hill, Franklin Street, Boston Coliseum, Boylston Market, Merchants Exchange, Haymarket Square, Boston Public Library, Horticultural Hall, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Revere House (Hotel), Huntington Avenue Grounds, Charlestown City Hall, Molasses Tank, Cyclorama, Readville Trotting Park and Race Track, East Boston Airport, Boston Latin School, East Boston Ferries, Braves Field, Massachusetts State Prison, Boston Opera House, Boston Aquarium, The Howard Athenaeum, and Dudley Street Station.

Publication InfoLost Boston with Anthony Sammarco on Fieldsotne Common

Title: Lost Boston

Publisher: Pavilion Books (2014)

Oversized Hardcover – 144 pages with lots of photos and an index.

Lost Boston is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Anthony Sammarco and I discuss the great variety of building and public places that have been removed from the Boston, Massachusetts landscape. They range from the Old Feather Shop to prisons, ferries and baseball fields. There was even a Victory Garden in what is now a park-like Copley Square. We discuss why the demolitions occurred and the way some buildings still remain but have been transformed. We also talk about the Boston Athenaeum as a historical repository and the importance of local history in the lives of neighborhood residents.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of Lost Boston is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Pavilion Books.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Pavilion Books for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/lost-boston-anthony-sammarco

News & Announcements

Fieldstone Common is now broadcast every other week.

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

 

FC 81 Through a Different Lens with Tasha Caswell

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Tasha Caswell, curator of the exhibit Through a Different Lens: Three Connecticut Women Photographers at the Connecticut Historical Society.

Bio – Tasha Caswell

Tasha Caswell on Fieldstone Common

photo by Kyle Sprague

Tasha Caswell is the Thorne-McKenna Curatorial Assistant at the Connecticut Historical Society. Since last October, she has been working to catalog and digitize the photographs by Harriet V.S. Thorne and Rosalie Thorne McKenna that were recently given to CHS by the Rosalie Thorne McKenna Foundation. Tasha has degrees from Ryerson University and George Eastman House, the University of Toronto, and Lewis & Clark College. She recently completed a ten-month student residency at George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography and Film, where she catalogued 19th- and 20th-century and contemporary photographic and audiovisual materials.

Book Summary

This exhibition at the Connecticut Historical Society (October 11, 2013 – March 29, 2014) presents the work of three female photographers, who came from very different places in Connecticut history and society. Each of their photographs is a record of personal and local history, a picture of the people, landscapes, and buildings of Connecticut. Together they reveal how women have taken part in amateur and professional photography from the late 1800s into the mid 1900s.

Publication Info Through a Different Lens: Connecticut Women Photographers

Title: Through a Different Lens: Three Connecticut Women Photographers

Publisher: Connecticut Historical Society (2013)

Exhibition Publication, 38 pages

Through a Different Lens: Three Connecticut Women Photographers is available for purchase fromthe Connecticut Historical Society.

The Interview

Tasha and I spoke about the three pioneering women photographers featured in the exhibit: Harriet Van Schoonhoven Thorne (1843-1926), Rosalie Thorne McKenna (1916-2003) and Marie Hartig Kendall (1854-1943). Harriet Thorne was from a wealthy family and focused her photography on portraits, mostly of her family. Her great granddaughter, Rosalie McKenna became a professional photographer before discovering her own ancestor’s connection with photography. She also did mostly portraits with some photos of Stonington, Connecticut where she lived. Marie Hartig Kendall, was a photographer and business woman who sold her photographs where ever she could. She focused extensively on the town of Norfolk, Connecticut. We also talked about what a curator looks for when creating an exhibit.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winners

One copy of Through a Different Lens: Three Connecticut Women Photographerswas given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the Connecticut Historical Society.

The winner is:

  • Leslie Wolfgang of Connecticut

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to the Connecticut Historical Society for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/different-lens-tasha-caswell

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 81)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 81 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

Show Notes – Carved in Stone with the Gilsons

Carved in Stone with Thomas & William Gilson on Fieldstone Common

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

NEW – Sign up to receive  email reminders for Fieldstone Common. Emails will be sent out once a week on Wednesdays. Enter your email address and then on the second page you will have the option to choose Fieldstone Common.

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 24 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Thomas and William Gilson, authors of Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

William Gilson

William Gilson is a writer now based in England. Thomas Gilson is a photographer based in New York. You can view sample images of the gravestone photos from the book on Thomas Gilson’s website

Thomas Gilson

The book Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones, published by the Wesleyan University Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

Three well-known gravestone researchers/authors were mentioned during the interview: Harriette Merrifield Forbes, Allan Ludwig and Vincent Luti

A great reference tool for viewing early 20th century black and white photographs of New England gravestones, many of which were photographed before stone deterioration, is the Farber Gravestone Collection at the American Antiquarian Society

A great place to learn more about gravestones and their carvers is the Association for Gravestone Studies. Be sure to check out their scholarly publication, Markers.

You can view gravestone photos by Marian Pierre-Louis on her blog, the Symbolic Past.

The Wesleyan University Press, the publisher of Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones, donated a copy of the book that was given as “door prize” during the live show. The copy went to a listener in Massachusetts. A big thank you to the Wesleyan University Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site. 

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Carved in Stone with the Gilsons

LIVE: THURSDAY, 24 January 2013 at 1:00pm EST

This Thursday on Fieldstone Common we will speak with authors and brothers Thomas and William Gilson about their book Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones.

Gravestones are colonial America’s earliest sculpture and they provide a unique physical link to the European people who settled here. Carved in Stone is an elegant collection of over 80 fine duotone photographs, each a personal meditation on an old stone carving, and on New England’s past, where these stones tell stories about death at sea, epidemics such as small pox, the loss of children, and a grim view of the afterlife. The essay is a graceful narrative that explores a long personal involvement with the stones and their placement in New England landscape, and attempts to trace the curious and imperfectly documented story of carvers. Brief quotes from early New England writers accompany the images, and captions provide basic information about each stone. These meditative portraits present an intimate view of figures from New England graveyards and will be enjoyed by anyone with an interest in early Americana and fine art photography.

Thomas E. Gilson is the author of The New England Farm, a highly praised book of photographs. He taught black and white photography in Vermont for 17 years and was managing editor and photographer for the New England Farmer. His photographs have been widely published and exhibited.

William Gilson attended the University of Connecticut, and his writing has been published in journals and magazines including New England Review, Orion, and Poetry Salzburg Review.

The Gilson brothers were born and raised in Connecticut.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – Final Thoughts with John Thomas Grant

Following are some notes on items that were mentioned during the 4 October 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with photographer John Thomas Grant, author of Final Thoughts: Eternal Beauty in Stone.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can learn more about John Thomas Grant at his website and you can follow him on his blog, Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

John is involved a joint business venture called The Passion Projects with Lisa Griffiths.

John and Lisa are both busy working on upcoming books.

Lisa will be publishing International Steampunk Fashions in January 2013 and another called The Fashionable Victorians and Edwardians.

John and Lisa are also working on a television show called All Things Victorian.

John is working on a number of projects including two civil war books – one which is a collection of civil war letters and the other on a 12 year old civil war soldier.  He also has in the works two more cemetery photography books called The  American Cemetery and  Death in Color.

John currently is exhibiting in two Gallery Shows:

The Cahoon Museum of American Art
4676 Falmouth Road
Cotuit, Massachusetts
Exhibiting until Oct. 28, 2012

The Vanover Fine Arts Gallery
49 East Main Street
Springville, New York
Exhibiting until Nov. 3, 2012

Schiffer Books, the publisher of Final Thoughts: Eternal Beauty in Stone, donated a copy that was given as a door prize during the live show. A big thank you to Schiffer Books for  their generosity!

Press play below to listen to the podcast.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Final Thoughts with John Thomas Grant

photo from Final Thoughts: Eternal Beauty in Stone
by John Thomas Grant

Listen in to Fieldstone Common this week as host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to John Thomas Grant, author of Final Thoughts: Eternal Beauty in Stone.

Photographer, Author, John Thomas Grant’s conceptualization of Final Thoughts was the consequence of the unraveling of some old letters, a personal journey in search of his family roots, and the chance meeting with a young man in a small New England town.

John interprets and connects with history through the camera lens. He reminds us that the past resides with us, sometimes forgotten and sometimes celebrated. The unique quality of John’s photos blends the past and the present together showing they are inseparably entwined.

Join us as we talk with John Thomas Grant about his book, his beautiful interpretation through photography and the impact it has had on his life and that of his readers.

LIVE: THURSDAY, 4 OCTOBER 2012 at 1:00pm EST 

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – The Last Muster with Maureen Taylor

Following are some notes on items that were mentioned during the 27 September 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with photo detective Maureen Taylor, author of The Last Muster: Images of the Revolutionary War Generation and Fashionable Folks Hairstyles 1840-1900.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can learn more about Maureen Taylor at her website and you can follow her on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

Maureen has been writing the Photo Detective column for Family Tree Magazine since 2001.

Sources for example period photographs

Dressed for the Photographer by Joan Severa 

Fashionable Folks Hairstyles 1840-1900 by Maureen Taylor 

Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats, 1840-1900 by Maureen Taylor

The Family Photo Detective by Maureen Taylor (to be published January 2013 by Family Tree Books)

Big Announcement
Maureen made a big announcement during the interview. She revealed that, in conjunction with Verissima Productions, she will be making a documentary of the based on The Last Muster book. The documentary, which is currently in the fundraising stage, has its own website so that you can follow its progress.

Maureen also announced that volume two of The Last Muster will be published around June 2013.

Kent State University Press, the publisher of The Last Muster, donated two copies that were given as a door prizes. A big thank you to Kent State University Press for  their generosity!

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Joe Manning featured on CBS News

Mamie LaBarge of Winchendon, Massachusetts
by Lewis Hine

On September 6, 2012 Joe Manning was a guest on Fieldstone Common discussing his wonderful Lewis Hine Project.

Lewis Hine was the photographer whose photographs of child laborers help transform child labor laws in the United States.

Joe Manning has devoted his retirement years to identifying the children in those photos.

Tonight Joe Manning was featured on the CBS Evening News. I am so excited for Joe. Please take a moment and watch the 2 1/2 minute video clip.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

The Last Muster with Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective

Maureen Taylor, The Photo Detective
Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective

LIVE: THURSDAY, 27 September 2012 at 1:00pm EST

Listen to Fieldstone Common this week as host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective, about her books The Last Muster and Fashionable Folks Hairstyles 1840-1900.

The Last Muster is a collection of rare nineteenth-century photographic images of the Revolutionary War generation. This extraordinary collection of images assigns faces to an un-illustrated war and tells the stories of our nation’s Founding Fathers and Mothers. The array of seventy images is expansive and includes veterans, loyalists, Native Americans, African Americans, children who witnessed battles and aided soldiers, and women who nursed the wounded and even took up arms themselves.

Maureen Taylor is an internationally recognized expert on the intersection of history, genealogy, and photography. She has been featured in top media outlets, including The View, Better Homes & Gardens, the Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, MSNBC, New Morning (Hallmark Channel), Life Magazine, DIY: Scrapbooking, PBS Ancestors, Claritin’s Moment of Clarity, Creative Memories’ Lasting Moments, Dear Myrtle, and Satisfaction Magazine. Maureen is the author of a number of books and magazine articles, as well as a contributing editor at Family Tree Magazine. 

The Last Muster by Maureen Taylor
The Last Muster

Maureen investigates photographs the way private eyes investigate cases. She discovers stories behind family pictures by following clues … a hat, the shape of a woman’s sleeve, or a sign in the background. Through her website, PhotoDetective.com, Maureen offers practical, affordable advice on how to save and organize photos. She also writes about the latest photo-related topics, products, and media coverage on her Photo Detective blog.

Visit the Fieldstone Common Radio site and sign up to “follow” the show so you will get a reminder about the upcoming episode.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – Joe Manning and the Lewis Hine Project

The Lewis Hine Project with Joe Manning on Fieldstone Common

Joe Manning

Following are some notes on items that were mentioned during the 6 September 2012 interview with Joe Manning about the Lewis Hine Project.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can learn more about Joe Manning in general from his website, Mornings on Maple Street

Joe’s website is also the portal to all the online information about the Lewis Hine Project.

Read more about Lewis Hine in his Wikipedia profile.

The Lawrence History Center in Lawrence, Massachusetts is currently displaying an exhibit based on the Lewis Hine Project focusing on the children of Lawrence photographed by Lewis Hine. The exhibit is running through September 30, 2012.

Joe Manning was featured in a Yankee Magazine article (available online) in 2011.

Steeples by Joe ManningThe Lewis Hine photos which are the basis of Joe’s research are available for viewing from the Library of Congress website .

The door prize given away during the show was a book authored by Joe Manning, Steeples: Sketches of North Adams.  Other books by Joe Manning include Disappearing Into North Adams and Gig at the Amtrak

Here is a Pinterest site that features Lewis Hine photos, including shots from when he photographed the construction of the Empire State Building. It includes the iconic photo of the construction works sitting on the beam over New York City. It also shows some of Hine’s Ellis Island photos.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis