FC 77 The Manor with Mac Griswold

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Mac Griswold, author of the book The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island.

Bio – Mac Griswold

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0374266298?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0374266298&linkCode=xm2&tag=marsrooram-20

Mac Griswold photo by Sigrid Estrada

Mac Griswold is an acclaimed cultural landscape historian and writer. Rooted in a childhood spent exploring the castles and towers of lush north central New Jersey, Mac went on to study landscape design at the Radcliffe Seminars and horticulture at the New York Botanical Gardens.

She is the author of Washington’s Gardens at Mount Vernon: Landscape of the Inner Man, Pleasure of the Garden: Images from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Golden Age of American Gardens: Proud Owners, Private Estates, with Eleanor Weller.

She taught landscape history at Sarah Lawrence College, where she was a recipient of the Noble Chair in Art and Cultural History, and has lectured widely in America and Europe. A Guggenheim fellow, she has written for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Travel + Leisure.

You can learn more about Mac Griswold at her author website, www.macgriswold.com. Learn more about Sylvestor Manor from their website, www.sylvestermanor.org.

Book Summary

Mac Griswold’s The Manor is the biography of a uniquely American place that has endured through wars great and small, through fortunes won and lost, through histories bright and sinister—and of the family that has lived there since its founding as a New England slave plantation three and a half centuries ago.

In 1984, the landscape historian Mac Griswold was rowing along a Long Island creek when she came upon a stately yellow house and a garden guarded by looming boxwoods. She instantly knew that boxwoods that large—twelve feet tall, fifteen feet wide—had to be hundreds of years old. So, as it happened, was the house: Sylvester Manor had been held in the same family for eleven generations.

Formerly encompassing all of Shelter Island, a pearl of 8,000 acres caught between the North and South Forks of Long Island, the manor had dwindled to 243 acres. Still, its hidden vault proved to be full of revelations and treasures, including the 1666 charter for the land, and correspondence from Thomas Jefferson. Most notable was the short and steep flight of steps the family had called the “slave staircase,” which would provide clues to the extensive but little-known story of Northern slavery. Alongside a team of archaeologists, Griswold began a dig that would uncover a landscape bursting with stories.

Based on years of archival and field research, as well as voyages to Africa, the West Indies, and Europe, The Manor is at once an investigation into forgotten lives and a sweeping drama that captures our history in all its richness and suffering.

 

Book InfoThe Manor by Mac Griswold on Fieldstone Common

Title: The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island

Publisher: Farrar, Strouss & Giroux (2013)

Hardcover; 273 pages with end notes, a bibliography, an index as well as BxW photos.

The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

Mac Griswold and I discuss the 17th century origins of Nathaniel Sylvester and his wife Grizell Brinley who developed the Manor on Shelter Island, Long Island, New York.  The home remains in the hands of descendants of the same family today. Slavery existed on Sylvester Manor as well as on Constant Plantation in Barbados, the estate of Nathaniel’s brother Sylvester. Mac makes interesting use of a treasure trove of original records and we discuss what was available and how it helped her research for the book.

Prize Winners

One copy of The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island was given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Farrar, Strouss & Giroux.

The winner is:

  • Carol Ubosi of Maryland

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Farrar, Strouss & Giroux for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/the-manor-mac-griswold

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 77)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 77 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 71 Cambridge Cameos with Roger Thompson

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Roger Thompson, author of the book Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in 17th Century New England.

Roger is our first Fieldstone Common guest to make a second appearance on the show. He first appeared discussing his book From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692. Roger lives in England so when he was visiting the United States this past summer I took advantage of fitting in a second interview with him.

This interview is a little different. It is not done in a studio but recorded live at his summer Cambridge Cameos with Roger Thomoson on Fieldstone Commonresidence in the very busy, bustling and noisy city of Cambridge, Massachusetts. So we will have some ambiance noise from this city in the background of the interview. I hope you won’t find that too distracting. It seems fitting somehow that we spoke in the heart of Cambridge since our discussion centered on the early history of that city.

Bio

Roger Thompson is emeritus professor of American Colonial History at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England.

In addition to From Deference to Defiance, Roger Thompson has written:

Book Summary

Cambridge Cameos contains forty-four sketches from the period 1651 to 1686 that combine good stories, intriguing personalities, and incidents involving mostly ordinary Cambridge people. They are based on thousands of original documents; virtually all primary sources with any bearing on the early history of Cambridge. Drawing on his vast knowledge of Middlesex County families and on his equally vast experience in the town and court records of that county, Roger Thompson has composed a number of delightful vignettes of early residents of the town of Cambridge. He provides us with a rare opportunity to hear these early New Englanders speak for themselves and to experience seventeenth-century life as directly as possible.

Book Info Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in Seventeenth-Century New England

Title: Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in 17th Century New England

Publisher: New England Historic Genealogical Society (2005)

Trade paperback; 355 pages with 2 appendices, footnotes notes, and an index.

Cambridge Cameos is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Roger and I dive into all the fascinating aspects of life in the 1600s in Cambridge from the unusual ways people paid for their Harvard tuition to the culture of discipline and why female healers were often accused of witchcraft.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Cambridge Cameos were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

The winners are:

  • Jean Smoorenburg of Texas
  • Cynthia Bishop of Virginia

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/cambridge-cameos-roger-thompson/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 70)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 70 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

Show Notes: From Deference to Defiance with Roger Thompson

Roger ThompsonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 8 August 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Roger Thompson about his book From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692, published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS), is available for purchase from NEHGS, Amazon.com and other booksellers.

From Deference to Defiance focuses on the history of Charlestown during this early critical time period. This comprehensive work covers topics such as where Charlestown residents originated in England, land issues, its relationship to the sea with a strong shipping industry, women, church, violence and the Glorious Revolution. Much of the content is presented in the form of case studies giving an up-front personal look at individual residents of Charlestown. At first glance you might think this is simply a book about Charlestown, Massachusetts. In reality, it’s a primer on understanding colonial New Englanders in the 1600s. Every 17th century scholar, researcher and genealogist should read this book.

In addition to From Deference to Defiance, Roger Thompson has written:

The New England Historic Genealogical Society, the publisher of From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Massachusetts and California. A big thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity.

From Deference to Defiance with Roger Thompson

From Deference to Defiance with Roger Thompson on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 8 August 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Roger Thompson, author of From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692.

Step back in time to discover the people, the customs and the history of Charlestown, Massachusetts from its earliest years. From Deference to Defiance explores the conflicts and interactions of early settlers and brings them to life in a way that is often difficult during this time period. Much of the text is extracted from early court records whose tales are not only re-told but interpreted and put into the proper context for the time period.

Roger Thompson guest on Fieldstone CommonRoger Thompson is emeritus professor of American Colonial History at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England. His earlier works include Sex in Middlesex: Popular Mores in a Massachusetts County, 1649–1699 (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1986), Divided We Stand: Watertown 1630–80 (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2001), and Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in Seventeenth-Century New England (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2005).

 

Show Notes – The Great Escape with Chris Pagliuco

ShowPhoto-Pagliuco-2Following are some items that were mentioned during the 6 June 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Christopher Pagliuco about his book The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe: Smuggled Through Connecticut.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe: Smuggled Through Connecticut, published by The History Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

2013-06-1You can learn more about Chris at his website. You can also follow him on Twitter.

Edward Whalley and William Goffe were labeled as regicides for their part in signing the death warrant of English King Charles I. With the return of Charles II the power, Whalley and Goffe fled to the New England colonies. They remained their in hiding for the rest of their lives without being discovered. Puritans leaders such as Rev. Increase Mather, Gov. John Endecott, and Gov. William Leete risked their lives to conceal and aid the pair. The legend of the Angel of Hadley arose out of William Goffe’s supposed bravery during King Philip’s War.

The History Press, the publisher of The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Tennessee and Arizona. A big thank you to the The History Press for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

The Great Escape with Christopher Pagliuco

ShowPhoto-Pagliuco-2LIVE: THURSDAY, 6 June 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Christopher Pagliuco, author of The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe: Smuggled Through Connecticut.

When Puritans Edward Whalley and William Goffe joined the parliamentary army against King Charles I in the English civil wars, they seized an opportunity to overthrow a tyrant. Under their battlefield leadership, the army trounced the Royalist forces and then cut off the king’s head. Yet when his son, Charles II, regained the throne, Whalley and Goffe were force to flee to the New England colonies aboard the ship Prudent Mary–never to see their families or England again. Even with the help of New England’s Puritan elite, including Reverend John Davenport, they struggled to stay a step ahead of searches for their arrest in Boston, New Haven (where they hid out in The Great Escape of Edward Whalley & William Goffe with Chris Pagliuco on Fieldstone CommonJudges Cave) and the outpost of Hadley, Massachusetts. Forced to live as fugitives, these former major generals survived frontier adventures in seventeenth-century New England. Author Christopher Pagliuco reveals the all-but-forgotten stories of these Connecticut heroes.

Chris Pagliuco is a freelance writer who specializes in seventeenth-century colonial history. His interest in the regicides originated in his graduate studies in history at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. He teaches high school history in Madison, Connecticut and serves as town historian in Essex, Connecticut and on the editorial team of Connecticut Explored, a quarterly history publication. He lives with his wife, two daughters, and two dogs in Ivoryton, Connecticut.

 

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle is now Archived as a Podcast

PodcasticonbyDerickkwaThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Ava Chamberlain author of the book The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle: Marriage, Murder, and Madness in the Family of Jonathan Edwards is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 28 March 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Prof. Ava Chamberlain, author of The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle: Marriage, Murder, and Madness in the Family of Jonathan Edwards.

Who was Elizabeth Tuttle?

In most histories, she is a footnote, a blip. At best, she is a minor villain in the story of Jonathan Edwards, perhaps the greatest American theologian of the colonial era. Many historians consider Jonathan Edwards a theological genius, wildly ahead of his time, a Puritan hero. Elizabeth Tuttle was Edwards’s “crazy grandmother,” the one whose madness and adultery drove his despairing grandfather to divorce.

In this compelling and meticulously researched work of micro-history, Ava Chamberlain unearths a fuller history of Elizabeth Tuttle. It is a violent and tragic story in which anxious patriarchs struggle to govern their households, unruly women disobey their husbands, mental illness tears families apart, and loved ones die sudden deaths. Through the lens of Elizabeth Tuttle, Chamberlain re-examines the common narrative of Jonathan Edwards’s ancestry, giving his long-ignored paternal grandmother a voice.

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle not only brings to light the tragic story of an ordinary The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain on Fieldstone Commonwoman living in early New England, it also explores the deeper tension between the ideal of Puritan family life and its messy reality, complicating the way America has thought about its Puritan past.

Ava Chamberlain is Associate Professor of Religion at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. She is the editor of The “Miscellanies,” Nos. 501-832, vol. 18 of The Works of Jonathan Edwards.

 

Show Notes – One Colonial Woman’s World with Michelle Coughlin

One Woman's Colonial World with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 7 March 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin, author of One Colonial Woman’s World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

You can learn more about the book at the One Colonial Woman’s World website. The site also includes a list of appearance that Michelle Marchetti Coughlin will be making this year.

One Colonial Woman’s World, published by The University of Massachusetts Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

The Chandler family was originally from Roxbury, Massachusetts. In 1686 a number of Roxbury families including the Chandlers settled “New Roxbury” which later became Woodstock, Connecticut.

Mehetabel Chandler’s maternal side, the Douglases, settled in New London. Mehetabel married John Coit, also of New London, Connecticut.

During the week of the show it was discovered that Fieldstone Common host, Marian Pierre-Louis, is a descendant of Mehetabel Chandler Coit’s parents John Chandler and Elizabeth Douglas continuing down through the line of Mehetabel’s brother, John Chandler and his wife, Mary Raymond. Fieldstone Common listener Heather Rojo is also a descendant through Mehetabel’s sister, Hannah Chandler who married Moses Draper.

The University of Massachusetts Press, the publisher of One Colonial Woman’s World, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.  A big thank you to The University of Massachusetts Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Show Notes – Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 14 February 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with C.S. Manegold, author of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

You can learn more about C.S. Manegold  at her website as well as the site dedicated to to the book Ten Hills Farm.

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

Ten Hills Farm discusses the history of slavery in the north within the context of the property owners of farm through the centuries. The main characters discussed are Governor John Winthrop, Isaac Royall Sr. and Isaac Royall Jr.

The Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford, Massachusetts (a short drive from Boston) are owned and maintained by the Royall House Association. A great deal of information about the property and its history is available from the website. The property is open to the public between May and November. Check the website for details.

The book Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, published by Princeton University Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

C.S. Manegold is also the author of In Glory’s Shadow: The Citadel, Shannon Faulkner and a Changing Ameria.

During the show we discussed a conflict between Samuel Sewall and John Saffin over the issue of slavery (see pages 102-122 of Ten Hills Farm). One of the documents related to this disagreement, written by Sewall, is called “The Selling of Joseph” which can be viewed on the Massachusetts Historical Society website.

Princeton University Press, the publisher of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, donated a copy of the book which was given as “door prize” during the live show to a listener in Texas.  A big thank you to Princeton University Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site. 

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis