The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle is now Archived as a Podcast

PodcasticonbyDerickkwaThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Ava Chamberlain author of the book The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle: Marriage, Murder, and Madness in the Family of Jonathan Edwards is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

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The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 28 March 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Prof. Ava Chamberlain, author of The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle: Marriage, Murder, and Madness in the Family of Jonathan Edwards.

Who was Elizabeth Tuttle?

In most histories, she is a footnote, a blip. At best, she is a minor villain in the story of Jonathan Edwards, perhaps the greatest American theologian of the colonial era. Many historians consider Jonathan Edwards a theological genius, wildly ahead of his time, a Puritan hero. Elizabeth Tuttle was Edwards’s “crazy grandmother,” the one whose madness and adultery drove his despairing grandfather to divorce.

In this compelling and meticulously researched work of micro-history, Ava Chamberlain unearths a fuller history of Elizabeth Tuttle. It is a violent and tragic story in which anxious patriarchs struggle to govern their households, unruly women disobey their husbands, mental illness tears families apart, and loved ones die sudden deaths. Through the lens of Elizabeth Tuttle, Chamberlain re-examines the common narrative of Jonathan Edwards’s ancestry, giving his long-ignored paternal grandmother a voice.

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle not only brings to light the tragic story of an ordinary The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain on Fieldstone Commonwoman living in early New England, it also explores the deeper tension between the ideal of Puritan family life and its messy reality, complicating the way America has thought about its Puritan past.

Ava Chamberlain is Associate Professor of Religion at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. She is the editor of The “Miscellanies,” Nos. 501-832, vol. 18 of The Works of Jonathan Edwards.

 

Show Notes – One Colonial Woman’s World with Michelle Coughlin

One Woman's Colonial World with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 7 March 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin, author of One Colonial Woman’s World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

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You can learn more about the book at the One Colonial Woman’s World website. The site also includes a list of appearance that Michelle Marchetti Coughlin will be making this year.

One Colonial Woman’s World, published by The University of Massachusetts Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

The Chandler family was originally from Roxbury, Massachusetts. In 1686 a number of Roxbury families including the Chandlers settled “New Roxbury” which later became Woodstock, Connecticut.

Mehetabel Chandler’s maternal side, the Douglases, settled in New London. Mehetabel married John Coit, also of New London, Connecticut.

During the week of the show it was discovered that Fieldstone Common host, Marian Pierre-Louis, is a descendant of Mehetabel Chandler Coit’s parents John Chandler and Elizabeth Douglas continuing down through the line of Mehetabel’s brother, John Chandler and his wife, Mary Raymond. Fieldstone Common listener Heather Rojo is also a descendant through Mehetabel’s sister, Hannah Chandler who married Moses Draper.

The University of Massachusetts Press, the publisher of One Colonial Woman’s World, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.  A big thank you to The University of Massachusetts Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

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Show Notes – Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 14 February 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with C.S. Manegold, author of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

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You can learn more about C.S. Manegold  at her website as well as the site dedicated to to the book Ten Hills Farm.

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

Ten Hills Farm discusses the history of slavery in the north within the context of the property owners of farm through the centuries. The main characters discussed are Governor John Winthrop, Isaac Royall Sr. and Isaac Royall Jr.

The Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford, Massachusetts (a short drive from Boston) are owned and maintained by the Royall House Association. A great deal of information about the property and its history is available from the website. The property is open to the public between May and November. Check the website for details.

The book Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, published by Princeton University Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

C.S. Manegold is also the author of In Glory’s Shadow: The Citadel, Shannon Faulkner and a Changing Ameria.

During the show we discussed a conflict between Samuel Sewall and John Saffin over the issue of slavery (see pages 102-122 of Ten Hills Farm). One of the documents related to this disagreement, written by Sewall, is called “The Selling of Joseph” which can be viewed on the Massachusetts Historical Society website.

Princeton University Press, the publisher of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, donated a copy of the book which was given as “door prize” during the live show to a listener in Texas.  A big thank you to Princeton University Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site. 

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Ten Hills Farm with CS Manegold

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

LIVE: THURSDAY, 14 February 2013 at 1:00pm EST

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews CS Manegold, author of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North.

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

C.S. Manegold

Ten Hills Farm tells the powerful saga of five generations of slave owners in colonial New England. Settled in 1630 by John Winthrop–who would later become governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony–Ten Hills Farm was a six-hundred-acre estate just north of Boston. Winthrop, famous for envisioning his ‘city on the hill’ and lauded as a paragon of justice, owned slaves on that ground and passed the first law in North America condoning slavery.

In this mesmerizing narrative, C. S. Manegold exposes how the fates of the land and the families that lived on it were bound to America’s most tragic and tainted legacy. Challenging received ideas about America and the Atlantic world, Ten Hills Farm digs deep to bring the story of slavery in the North full circle–from concealment to recovery. Manegold follows the compelling tale from the early seventeenth to the early twenty-first century, from New England, through the South, to the sprawling slave plantations of the Caribbean.

C. S. Manegold is the author of In Glory’s Shadow: The Citadel, Shannon Faulkner, and a Changing America (Knopf). As a reporter with the New York Times, Newsweek, and the Philadelphia Inquirer, she received numerous national awards and was part of the New York Times team honored with a Pulitzer Prize in 1994.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Mofford

The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 17 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Juliet Haines Mofford, author of The Devil Made Me Do It: Crime and Punishment in Early New England.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can connect with Juliet Mofford Haines on Facebook and LinkedIn. Juliet also gave out her email address during the show. Have a listen to the show to get that.

The book The Devil Made Me Do It, published by the Globe Pequot Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com

Juliet has published eleven books some of which include  

  • Cry “witch”: the Salem witch trials, 1692 (Discovery Enterprises, 1995) 
  • Greater Lawrence, a bibliography : an annotated guide to the history of Andover, Methuen, Lawrence, and North Andover (Merrimack Valley Textiles Museum, 1978) The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone Common
  • The history of North Parish Church of North Andover, 1645-1974: and firm thine ancient vow (Mofford, 1975). 

She has also written a number of history books targeted toward juvenile readers.

One of the places that Juliet mentions during the interview is the Old Gaol in York, Maine.  Juliet not only worked there previously but she also writes about it in the book. The Old Gaol is part of the The Old York Historical Society which has  number of historical buildings which you can visit.

The Globe Pequot Press, the publisher of The Devil Made Me Do It: Crime and Punishment in Early New England, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show. One copy went to a listener in Colorado and the other to a listener in Massachusetts. A big thank you to the Globe Pequot Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012. Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.


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Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Haines Mofford

LIVE: THURSDAY, 17 January 2013 at 1:00pm EST

This Thursday on Fieldstone Common we will speak author Juliet Haines Mofford about her book The Devil Made Me Do It! Crime and Punishment in Early New England.

Whether it was Sabbath-breaking, blasphemy, or public drunkenness, colonial laws were strict and frequently broken, and those who broke them could expect swift punishment. Laws were designed to reflect Puritan ideas of ensuring God’s blessings upon the community, as well as to tightly maintain order in ways that would benefit the entire colony. Each neighbor had a role in preserving family values and keeping the community safe from “railing scolds,” vagabonds, malefactors, and malefic witches.

Some of the ways that seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century New England communities dealt with murder and mayhem seem brutal to modern sensibilities. Today, Joan Andrews would not be forced to wear a T for theft upon her bodice for placing stones in the firkin of butter she sold a client. And Lydea Abbot would certainly not be made to suffer in the stocks for “uttering ten profain curses.”

The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone Common
Juliet Haines Mofford

Drawing from early court dockets, diaries, sermons, gaolers’ records, and other primary sources, the chapters in this book investigate crimes like these and illuminate the social and political causes behind legal cases from a time when accused felons often pleaded in their own defense: “The Devil made me do it!”

Juliet Haines Mofford is a historian and museum educator based in Maine. Two of her eleven books received national awards from the American Association for State and Local History. Her feature articles have appeared in the Boston Globe and many other publications. She served on the educational board of the American Association of Museums.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – A New England Town with Ken Lockridge

A New England Town with Ken Lockridge on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 29 November 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with Prof. Kenneth A. Lockridge, author of A New England Town: The First Hundred Years.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can learn more about Ken Lockridge from his staff page in the history department at the University of Montana.

Following are specific notes from the discussion:

The two books that host Marian Pierre-Louis found to be very influential include:
In Small Things Forgotten by James Deetz 
The Mid-Wife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812 by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich
 
New England Towns

A New England Town: The First Hundred Years was published in 1970 and is still available through various book sellers such as Amazon.com

Four influential early New England town studies were published in the early 1970s. They include:
A New England Town: The First Hundred Years by Kenneth A. Lockridge
A Little Commonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony by John Demos
Peacable Kingdoms: New England Towns in the Eighteenth Century by Michael Zuckerman
Four Generations: Population Land, and Family in Colonial Andover, Massachusetts by Philip J. Greven Jr.

These books should all be readily available from your local library network.

A panel discussing the importance of these books was held at the 2010 American History Association conference in San Diego. The panelists included all four authors above. A synopsis of that discussion was written by attendee Eric Miller.

Professor Lockridge’s specific fields of interest include:

Early American History, 1607-1830
The American Revolution and its Cultural Consequences, 1765-1998
Native American History, 1600-1800
Literacy, Reading, and the Book, 1600-1800
Gender History, 1690-1830
Swedish Social and Demographic History, 1750-1920


Gustavus Hesselius

Ken talked about Gustavus Hesselius and his accurate and sympathetic paintings of Native Americans. The specific article he was referring to was “Overcoming Nausea: The Brothers Hesselius and the American Mystery.” This article is available on the Common-place website. Color images of the paintings are available in that article.

A revised version of the same article with substantial new research is found in English Atlantics Revisited edited by Nancy Rhoden (McGill-Queens University Press, 2007)

Declining Fertility Rates

Further information on this topic can be found in:

Family Patterns in Nineteenth Century Swedenwith Bobbi Low and Alice Clarke, published by the Demographic Database, Umeå, Sweden, 1992.
“Toward an Ecological Demography,” with B. Low and A. Clarke, Population and Development Review, 18, 1 (March 1992), 1-32.

“Sally Has Been Sick: Pregnancy and Family Limitation Among Virginia Gentry Women, 1780-1840,” with Jan    
       Lewis, based on a paper delivered at the 1986 meeting of the American Historical Association, submitted by request 
       to the Journal of Social History, and published Fall, 1988.  Reprinted in Mother and Motherhood, Readings in

American Women’s History, ed. Janet Golden, Ohio State University Press, 1997, and in Family and Society in American History, Joseph A. Hawes and Elizabeth I. Nybakken, eds. (Urbana, University of Illinois Press, 2001.)

The Fertility Transition in Sweden: The Evidence of Smaller Geographic Units, 1805-1890.  Demographic Database, Umeå, Sweden, 1983.  A summary version was printed in the Proceedings of the Nordic Demographic Conference, Sweden, 1983.

 

Translating Swedish Civil War book

Ken is currently translating a work from Swedish:

Translation of Åke Sandström, A War Within the Civil War: Colonel Oscar Malmborg and the Men of the     55th  Illinois Infantry.
Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

A New England Town With Ken Lockridge

Professor Ken Lockridge

Broadcast Time: THURSDAY, 29 November 2012 at 1:00pm EST

In 1970 Professor Ken Lockridge published a book called A New England Town: The First Hundred Years. This book established an innovative way to examine and interpret developing 17th century New England towns. The book allowed us to look at these early colonists as people rather than simply names and dates. In addition, works published at the same time by his colleagues Demos, Greven and Zuckerman helped set off a new interest in the history of early America.

Join Marian Pierre-Louis, host of Fieldstone Common, as she discusses the start of Professor Lockridge’s career with A New England Town and then progresses through 40 years of his fascinating historical projects.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Thanksgiving Traditions with Culinarian Kathleen Wall

A Special Thanksgiving Day Episode

THURSDAY, 22 November 2012 at 1:00pm EST

Fieldstone Common Host Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Plimoth Plantation culinarian Kathleen Wall about the First Thanksgiving and all the traditions that surround the holiday.

After the turkey dinner is over and you’re done playing football, grab a quiet moment and listen as Kathleen and I discuss the First Thanksgiving, how the holiday has transformed over the years, what foods would have been typical on a 17th century dinner table and the myths that just won’t go away.

I guarantee you will find it fascinating.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis