FC 90 Fort Halifax with Daniel Tortora

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Daniel J. Tortora, the author of the book Fort Halifax: Winslow’s Historic Outpost.

Bio – Daniel J. Tortora

Daniel Tortora is an assistant professor of history at Colby College. An expert on early American and Native American history, he speaks extensively on the French and Indian Fort Halifax Winslow, Maine Habs photo (LOC)War and Revolutionary War eras. He leads battlefield and historic tours and has contributed to numerous films, archaeological projects, websites, exhibits and research projects. In 2011, he was appointed to the Fort Halifax Park Implementation Committee.

Book Summary

Winslow has grown up around Fort Halifax in its many, many incarnations. Beginning as a French and Indian War garrison and trading post, the fort welcomed historic figures from Benedict Arnold and Aaron Burr to Paul Revere and Chief Joseph Orono. Reduced to one small blockhouse in the 1800s, Fort Halifax hosted archaeologists, travelers, artists, politicians and students. The Flood of 1987 swept away the blockhouse, leaving the fort and its supporters to fight an uphill battle for reconstruction. Throughout varied iterations, uses, trials and tribulations, Fort Halifax has remained the symbol of a community. Join historian Daniel J. Tortora in this engaging narrative of Fort Halifax’s fight for survival. Meet the famous visitors to the fort, the local residents who have cared for it and the figures who have kept its memory relevant and its future hopeful.

Publication InfoFort Halifax with Daniel J. Tortora on Fieldstone Common

Title: Fort Halifax: Winslow’s Historic Outpost

Publisher: The History Press (2014)

Trade Paperback; 158 pages with end notes, a bibliography, an index, and some photos and illustrations.

Fort Halifax: Winslow’s Historic Outpost is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Daniel Tortora and I discuss the strategic location of Fort Halifax at the confluence of the Kennebec and Sebasticook rivers. Fort Halifax became the most northern outpost for the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Though the history of Fort Halifax as an active military outpost was short-lived it was witness to skirmishes with the Native American population and was host Benedict Arnold during the Revolutionary War.  Much of the story of Fort Halifax is the tenacity of its survival and its rebirth with the help of the Daughters of the American Revolution and devoted preservationists.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of Fort Halifax: Winslow’s Historic Outpost is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/fort-halifax-daniel-tortora

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 90)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 90 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 88 Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England with Corin Hirsch

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Corin Hirsch, the author of the book Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England: From Flips & Rattle-Skulls to Switchel & Spruce Beer.

Bio – Corin Hirsch

Corin Hirsch is a drinks writer as well as associate editor and writer for Convene Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England with Corin Hirsch on Fieldstone CommonMagazine. Previously she was an award-winning culinary writer at Seven Days, the alternative weekly newspaper in Burlington, Vermont where she profiled chefs, farmers, cheese makers, brewers and trends in the hotbed of farm-to-table fare, and developed seasonal recipes and cocktails. Her work has also appeared in a range of regional publications. She is a member of the Association for Food Journalists, and recently won a 2nd Place for Best Food Writing from the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies.

Corin learned to pull a pint of Schlitz (for her grandfather) at the age of six, and she used to tend bar inside a sixteenth-century English pub. She has written about craft beer for Serious Eats and also ghost-blogs and writes in the wine world. This is her first book.

Book Summary

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farm workers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. Tipples at breakfast, lunch, teatime and dinner were the norm, and low-alcohol hard cider was sometimes even a part of children’s lives. This burgeoning cocktail culture reflected the New World’s abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops. This plentiful drinking sustained a slew of smoky taverns and inns–watering holes that became vital meeting places and the nexuses of unrest as the Revolution brewed. New England food and drinks writer Corin Hirsch explores the origins and taste of the favorite potations of early Americans and offers some modern-day recipes to revive them today.

Publication InfoForgotten Drinks of Colonial New England with Corin Hirsch on Fieldstone Common

Title: Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England: From Flips & Rattle-Skulls to Switchel & Spruce Beer

Publisher: The History Press (2014)

Trade Paperback; 126 pages with a glossary, sources, an index, recipes and lots of photos and illustrations.

Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England: From Flips & Rattle-Skulls to Switchel & Spruce Beer is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Corin and I dig into the how, where, why and when of Colonial drinking! Did you know that Harvard University had its own brewery?  Have you ever heard of Flip, Grog, Stone Fence or Rattle-Skulls? We’ll explain what those are during the show. We also discuss what Benjamin Franklin did every time he entered a pub. Get comfortable and join for this fun discussion!

Links mentioned during the interview

  • The Inn at Weathersfield (VT) – Take a drinks class with Corin Hirsch in a beautiful 21 acres setting in Vermont. Date of class: December 6, 2014

Prize Winner

One copy of Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winner is:

  • Larry McGrail of Arizona

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/forgotten-drinks-colonial-new-england-corin-hirsch

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 87)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 87 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 87 A History of Howard Johnson’s with Anthony Sammarco

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Anthony Sammarco, the author of the book A History of Howard Johnson’s: How a Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became an American Icon.

Bio – Anthony Sammarco

Since 1997, Anthony Sammarco has taught history at the Urban College of Boston, and his course “Boston’s Immigrants” is based on his book of the same name to highlight the city’s diversity. He was named educator of the year in 2003 and he serves on the UCB’s A History of Howard Johnson's with Anthony Sammarco on Fieldstone CommonLeadership Council. Mr. Sammarco received the Bulfinch Award from the Doric Dames of the Massachusetts State House and the Washington Medal from the Freedom Foundation and was named Dorchester town historian by Raymond L. Flynn, mayor of Boston. He was elected a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is a member of the Boston Author’s Club and is a proprietor of the Boston Athenaeum. In his volunteer work, he is treasurer of the Victorian Society, New England Chapter, and a trustee of the Forest Hills Cemetery Educational Trust. He is past president of the Bay State Historical League and the Dorchester Historical Society. He lives in Boston and in Osterville on Cape Cod.

Book Summary

Howard Johnson created an orange-roofed empire of ice cream stands and restaurants that stretched from Maine to Florida and all the way to the West Coast. Popularly known as the “Father of the Franchise Industry,” Johnson delivered good food and prices that brought appreciative customers back for more. The attractive white Colonial Revival restaurants, with eye-catching porcelain tile roofs, illuminated cupolas and sea blue shutters, were described in Reader’s Digest in 1949 as the epitome of “eating places that look like New England town meeting houses dressed up for Sunday.” Boston historian and author Anthony M. Sammarco recounts how Howard Johnson introduced twenty-eight flavors of ice cream, the “Tendersweet” clam strips, grilled frankforts and a menu of delicious and traditional foods that families eagerly enjoyed when they traveled.

Publication Info

Title: A History of Howard Johnson’s: How a Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became an American Icon

Publisher: The History Press (2013)

Paperback; 157 pages  with a bibliography, index and lots of photos.

A History of Howard Johnson’s: How a Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became an American Icon is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Anthony and I discuss Howard Johnson, the man, who built an incredible business empire of restaurants and hotels that originated in the Boston area. We also talk about some very surprising cameo appearances by Jacques Pepin, Pierre Franey and the House of Dior. We start with the rise of Howard Johson’s as an ice cream stand to its demise in 1979 when it was sold out of the family. You will be surprised by the history you hear in this story!

Prize Winner

One copy of A History of Howard Johnson’s is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/history-howard-johnsons-anthony-sammarco

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 87)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 87 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 79 The Underground Railroad on Long Island with Kathleen Velsor

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Kathleen G. Velsor, author of the book The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom.

Bio – Kathleen G. Velsor

Dr. Kathleen Gaffney Velsor is an associate professor in the School of Education at the State University of New York Old Westbury. She earned an undergraduate degree in fine The Underground Railroad on Long Island with Kathleen G. Velsor on Fieldsotne Commonarts and education from Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri, and received her master’s degree in educational administration from Lehigh University in Pennsylvania and her doctorate in educational research from the University of Cincinnati in Ohio. She has received numerous grants to research the Quaker involvement in the Underground Railroad on Long Island, most recent among them an education grant from the Long Island Community Foundation to establish the Underground Teaching Partnership to build community through interdisciplinary social studies workshops for schoolteachers.

Book Summary

From the arrival of the Quakers in the seventeenth century to the enforcement of the Emancipation Proclamation, Long Island played an important role in the Underground Railroad’s work to guide slaves to freedom. In Old Westbury, the Post family established a major stop on the freedom trail with the help of an escaped Virginia slave. In Jericho, families helped escaping slaves to freedom from the present-day Maine Maid Inn. Elias Hicks helped free 191 slaves himself and worked to create Underground Railroad safe houses in many northeastern cities. Some former slaves even established permanent communities across the island. Visit the safe houses many of which are still standing today and explore the journey of runaway slaves on Long Island.

Book InfoThe Underground Railroad on Long Island with Kathleen G. Velsor on Fieldsotne Common

Title: The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom

Publisher: The History Press (2013)

Trade Paperback; 144 pages; with end notes, bibliography, index and BxW photos & illustrations.

The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

During the interview Kathleen and I discussed the long involvement of Quakers on Long Island with the anti-slavery movement. Around the time of the American Revolution Quakers started to become uncomfortable with the idea of any human being held in bondage. In the Long Island area Quakers were lead with the strong Leadership of Elias Hicks who rallied other Quakers to join his anti-slavery cause.  His followers were called Hicksite Quakers. Hicksites first manumitted their own slaves. As time passed they developed the network of the Underground Railroad and worked toward helping enslaved people to freedom as well as educating them in reading and writing and providing a trade.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winners

One copy of The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom was given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winner is:

  • Vonda McCrae of Virginia

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/underground-railroad-kathleen-velsor/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 78)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 78 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 67 Traditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter Rose

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Peter G. Rose, food historian and author of the book Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch.

Bio

Peter G. Rose was born in Utrecht, the Netherlands, and was educated there as well as in Switzerland. She came to the United States in the mid-1960s. She has worked as a Traditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter G. Rosefood writer and contributed a syndicated column on family food and cooking to the New York-based Gannett newspapers for more than twenty years. She has written articles for magazines such as Gourmet and Saveur, as well as for newspapers and magazines in the Netherlands, and locally for Hudson Valley Magazine and The Valley Table.

She started her research on the influence of the Dutch on the American kitchen in the early 1980s and published her first book on the subject,The Sensible Cook: Dutch Foodways in the Old and the New World, at the end of that decade. It was followed by Foods of the Hudson: A Seasonal Sampling of the Region’s Bounty (1993); and Matters of Taste: Food and Drink in Seventeenth-Century Dutch Art and Lifewith Dr. Donna R. Barnes (2002). More recently, she published Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch (2009) and Summer Pleasures, Winter Pleasures: a Hudson Valley Cookbook (2009). She is the 2002 recipient of the Alice P. Kenney Award for her research and writing on Dutch food history.

As a member of the Speakers in the Humanities program of the New York Council for the Humanities, she lectures on historic Dutch food ways all over New York State. She illustrates her talks with paintings of the Dutch Masters and has spoken at many museums with holdings of such Dutch art all around America. She lives with her husband, Don, in the beautiful, historic Hudson Valley of New York.

You can learn more about Peter at her website as well as check out her upcoming appearance schedule.

Book Summary

In 1609, Henry Hudson, under contract with the Dutch East India Company, set out to discover the lucrative Northwest Passage. The Hudson River Valley is what he discovered instead, and along its banks Dutch culture took hold. While the Dutch influence can still be seen in local architecture and customs, it is food and drink that Peter Rose has made her life’s work. From beer to bread and cookies to coleslaw, “Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch” is a comprehensive look at this important early American influence, complete with recipes to try.

Book InfoTraditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter G. Rose

Title: Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch

Publisher: The History Press (2009)

Trade paperback; 157 pages with bibliography, index and some BxW photos and illustrations.

Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we talk about the traditions of The Netherlands and how they were brought to New Netherland in America. Our discussion focuses predominantly on the Hudson Valley area of New York. The mainstays of the Dutch diet included bread and beer and a favorite fondness for cookies and pastries. The Hudson Valley Dutch were in close proximity to Native American communities and the two cultures impacted each other’s food traditions.  Many Dutch foods worked their way into mainstream American culture such as doughnuts, waffles and cookies.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winners are:

  • Geri Neumann of New York
  • Mary Perra of New York

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 067)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 63 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 061 Hanging Ruth Blay with Carolyn Marvin

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Carolyn Marvin, author of the book Hanging Ruth Blay: An Eighteenth-Century New Hampshire Tragedy.

Bio

Carolyn Marvin currently works as a research librarian at the Portsmouth Athenaeum in Hanging Ruth Blay with Carolyn Marvin on Fieldstone CommonPortsmouth, New Hampshire. Previously, she worked in both public and school libraries. Ms. Marvin lives in a tiny ivy-covered brick house in Portsmouth with her granddaughter, three cats, Dante the Westie, and lots of fish.

Book Summary

On a cold December morning in 1768, thirty-one-year-old Ruth Blay approached the gallows erected for her execution. Standing on the high ground in the northwest corner of what is now Portsmouth’s old South Cemetery, she would have had a clear view across the pasture to the harbor and open sea. The eighteenth-century hanging of a schoolteacher for concealing the birth of a child out of wedlock has appeared in local legend over the last few centuries, but the full account of Ruth’s story has never been told. Drawing on over two years of investigative research, author Carolyn Marvin brings to light the dramatic details of Ruth’s life and the cruel injustice of colonial Portsmouth’s moral code. As Marvin uncovers the real flesh-and-blood woman who suffered the ultimate punishment, her readers come to understand Ruth as an individual and a woman of her time.

Hanging Ruth Blay with Carolyn Marvin on Fieldstone CommonBook Info

Title: Hanging Ruth Blay: An Eighteenth-Century New Hampshire Tragedy

Publisher: The History Press (2010)

Trade paperback; 125 pages with end notes, bibliography and some BxW photos and illustrations.

Hanging Ruth Blay: An Eighteenth-Century New Hampshire Tragedy is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we explore the difficult situation of out of wedlock births and the legal and moral ramifications they had in society. Ruth Blay was ultimately hanged for concealing the birth of a bastard child though she was not convicted of infanticide. There are very fine lines drawn between what an 18th century woman is expected to do at the time of birth and what can land her in trouble with the courts. While we may never know why she behaved the way she did, we do have Ruth’s poignant confession where she is defiant and defending her innocence to the last.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Hanging Ruth Blay were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the the History Press.

The winners are:

  • Clare Gunning of New York
  • Annemare Taylor of Massachusetts

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the History Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 061)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 61 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 060 Ocean-Born Mary with Jeremy D’Entremont

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Jeremy D’Entremont, author of the book Ocean-Born Mary: The Truth Behind a New Hampshire Legend.

Bio

Jeremy D’Entremont, author of Ocean-Born Mary, has been writing about and Ocean-Born Mary with Jeremy D'Entremont on Fieldstone Commonphotographing the lighthouses of New England since the mid-1980s. He’s the author of more than ten books and hundreds of articles on lighthouses and other maritime subjects. He’s the historian for the American Lighthouse Foundation, founder of Friends of Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouses, and the webmaster of New England Lighthouses: A Virtual Guide which can be found at www.newenglandlighthouses.net. He is also the owner and tour operator for New England Lighthouse Tours. Jeremy lives in Portsmouth, NH.

Book Summary

Ocean-born Mary with Jeremy D'Entremont on Fieldstone CommonMeet Mary: ocean-born and named by an infamous pirate. Her birth saved a group of Scottish immigrants aboard a ship bound for New England in 1720. Halfway through the grueling voyage, pirates intercepted and captured the vessel. Upon hearing a baby’s cry, the pirate captain promised to spare the lives of all on board if the mother named her newborn Mary, possibly after his beloved mother. The ship arrived safely in Massachusetts, and Mary lived most of her long life in Londonderry, New Hampshire. Discover the house in Henniker, New Hampshire, that Mary is said to haunt and where a pirate purportedly stashed his treasure. Historian Jeremy D’Entremont separates the facts from the fantastic legends shrouding one of New England’s most enduring folk tales.

Book Info

Title: Ocean-Born Mary: The Truth Behind a New Hampshire Legend

Publisher: The History Press (2011)

Trade paperback; 126 pages with an appendix, bibliography and some BxW photos and illustrations.

Ocean-Born Mary: The Truth Behind a New Hampshire Legend is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we dive into the original tale of Ocean-born Mary and follow the development of the tale in published forms through the years starting in the 1800s. In the 20th century a gentleman named Gussie Roy lived in Robert Wallace’s home which he called the Ocean-born Mary house. Gussie was responsible for many of the embellishments to the story. We also explore some ghost stories as well as the likelihood of which real life pirate was the inspiration for the tale.

Heather Rojo, President of the Londonderry, New Hampshire Historical Society, has written a blog post (with photos) about Ocean-Born Mary to coincide with the release of this interview. Stop by her blog and see some artifacts from Ocean-Born Mary herself!

Prize Winners

Two copies of Ocean-Born Mary were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the the History Press.

The winners are:

  • Peg Cronk of California
  • Linda Denton of Kentucky

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the History Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 060)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 60 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the link above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Show Notes: The North End with Alex Goldfeld

The North End with Alex R. Goldfeld on Feildstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 27 June 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Alex R. Goldfeld about his book The North End: A Brief History of Boston’s Oldest Neighborhood.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

The North End, published by The History Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Alex Goldfeld is a public historian based in Boston, Massachusetts. You can learn more about Alex Goldfeld at his website. Alex is also the President and Historian of the North End Historical Society. They have a website and a Facebook page.

The North End covers nearly 400 years of history starting with the creation of the Puritan The North End by Alex R. Goldfeldsettlement in 1630 and progressing through the American Revolution and includes the impact of major ethnic groups such as African Americans and the Irish. Many critical events at the start of the American Revolution took place in the North End. Today the North End is known as an Italian neighborhood with many top notch Italian restaurants and numerous Saints Festivals during the summer months.

The History Press, the publisher of The North End, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Arizona and New Hampshire. A big thank you to the The History Press for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Show Notes – The Great Escape with Chris Pagliuco

ShowPhoto-Pagliuco-2Following are some items that were mentioned during the 6 June 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Christopher Pagliuco about his book The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe: Smuggled Through Connecticut.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe: Smuggled Through Connecticut, published by The History Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

2013-06-1You can learn more about Chris at his website. You can also follow him on Twitter.

Edward Whalley and William Goffe were labeled as regicides for their part in signing the death warrant of English King Charles I. With the return of Charles II the power, Whalley and Goffe fled to the New England colonies. They remained their in hiding for the rest of their lives without being discovered. Puritans leaders such as Rev. Increase Mather, Gov. John Endecott, and Gov. William Leete risked their lives to conceal and aid the pair. The legend of the Angel of Hadley arose out of William Goffe’s supposed bravery during King Philip’s War.

The History Press, the publisher of The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Tennessee and Arizona. A big thank you to the The History Press for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Show Notes – Hidden History of the Boston Irish

ShowPhoto-Stevens-1Following are some items that were mentioned during the 21 March 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Peter F. Stevens, author of Hidden History of the Boston Irish: Little Known Tales from Ireland’s “Next Parish Over.”

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio


Hidden History of the Boston Irish,
published by The History Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

Other books by Peter Stevens include:

The History Press, the publisher of Hidden History of the Boston Irish: Little Known Tales from Ireland’s “Next Parish Over.”, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Michigan and Texas.  A big thank you to The History Press for  their generosity!

The Heirloom RegistryFieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 33 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering RT2013 – in all caps – at checkout. Offer good through March 25, 2013.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

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