FC 71 Cambridge Cameos with Roger Thompson

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Roger Thompson, author of the book Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in 17th Century New England.

Roger is our first Fieldstone Common guest to make a second appearance on the show. He first appeared discussing his book From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692. Roger lives in England so when he was visiting the United States this past summer I took advantage of fitting in a second interview with him.

This interview is a little different. It is not done in a studio but recorded live at his summer Cambridge Cameos with Roger Thomoson on Fieldstone Commonresidence in the very busy, bustling and noisy city of Cambridge, Massachusetts. So we will have some ambiance noise from this city in the background of the interview. I hope you won’t find that too distracting. It seems fitting somehow that we spoke in the heart of Cambridge since our discussion centered on the early history of that city.

Bio

Roger Thompson is emeritus professor of American Colonial History at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England.

In addition to From Deference to Defiance, Roger Thompson has written:

Book Summary

Cambridge Cameos contains forty-four sketches from the period 1651 to 1686 that combine good stories, intriguing personalities, and incidents involving mostly ordinary Cambridge people. They are based on thousands of original documents; virtually all primary sources with any bearing on the early history of Cambridge. Drawing on his vast knowledge of Middlesex County families and on his equally vast experience in the town and court records of that county, Roger Thompson has composed a number of delightful vignettes of early residents of the town of Cambridge. He provides us with a rare opportunity to hear these early New Englanders speak for themselves and to experience seventeenth-century life as directly as possible.

Book Info Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in Seventeenth-Century New England

Title: Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in 17th Century New England

Publisher: New England Historic Genealogical Society (2005)

Trade paperback; 355 pages with 2 appendices, footnotes notes, and an index.

Cambridge Cameos is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Roger and I dive into all the fascinating aspects of life in the 1600s in Cambridge from the unusual ways people paid for their Harvard tuition to the culture of discipline and why female healers were often accused of witchcraft.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Cambridge Cameos were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

The winners are:

  • Jean Smoorenburg of Texas
  • Cynthia Bishop of Virginia

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/cambridge-cameos-roger-thompson/

News & Announcements

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Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 70)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 70 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 059 Witches, Rakes, and Rogues with D. Brenton Simons

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is D. Brenton Simons, author of the book Witches, Rakes, and Rogues: True Stories of Scam, Scandal, Murder, and Mayhem in Boston, 1630-1775.

Bio

Witches, Rakes, and Rogues with D. Brenton Simons on Fieldstone Common

D. Brenton Simons

D. Brenton Simons, is the President and CEO of the New England Historic Genealogical Society in Boston, Massachusetts.

Currently piloting a groundbreaking $50 million capital campaign, Brenton Simons has led the Society to major growth in its national services and scope and to its pivotal role in the popular expansion of the genealogical field in America.

A staff member since 1993 and President and CEO since 2005, he has developed several of the organization’s most popular services, including its website, member magazine, and special publications imprint. In addition, he is the author of several books, including Boston Beheld: Antique Town and Country Views and Witches, Rakes, and Rogues, winner of the 2006 Award of Merit from the Association for State and Local History.

Most recently he produced, with Atlantic Media, a short film on the society, “A Farseeing Vision,” recipient of the 2011 Silver Telly Award. His genealogical articles have appeared in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, The American Genealogist, The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine and elsewhere. A graduate of Boston University, he is a member of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, the American Antiquarian Society, the Club of Odd Volumes, the Society of the Cincinnati, and is a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Book Summary

Witches, Rakes, and Rogues with D. Brenton Simons on Fieldstone CommonBostonians of the colonial period may have been Puritans, but they were anything but pure. Witches, Rakes, and Rogues demonstrates that from the city’s founding until the Revolution, Boston’s narrow, twisting streets were crawling with witches, murderers, con men, swindlers, and blackguards.

By digging deep into the city’s records, Simons reveals a veritable rogues’ gallery, and even uncovering the truth – in “Murder by Arsenic: The Ill-fated Greenleaf Children” – about Boston’s first documented serial murder. Other true tales include “The Turbulent Passions of Ann Hibbins,” “The Diabolical Possession of Martha Robinson,” “The Extortion Plot Against Two Gentlemen of Substance,” and stories of bigamists, thieves, miscreants and black sheep.

Book Info

Title: Witches, Rakes, and Rogues: True Stories of Scam, Scandal, Murder, and Mayhem in Boston, 1630-1775

Publisher: The New England Historic Genealogical Society (2006)

Hardcover; 260 pages with end notes, bibliography, index and some BxW photos and illustrations.

Witches, Rakes, and Rogues is available for purchase from Amazon.com, The New England Historic Genealogical Society and other booksellers.

The Interview

Toward the beginning of the interview Brenton Simons read a passage describing the attempted murder of Cotton Mather by a granade thrown through a window.

Later on he read a first hand description by Samuel Breck of people being punished at the whipping post and the pillory and the horrible things the public threw at the criminal.

In the middle of the interview Brenton made reference to a book. It was Legal Executions in New England: A Comprehensive Reference, 1623-1960 by Daniel Allen Hearn.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Witches, Rakes, and Rogues were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

The winners are:

  • Col. John Heavey Jr. of Kansas
  • Celia Lewis of British Columbia, Canada

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 059)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 59 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the link above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Show Notes: New England Research with Helen Ullmann

Helen Schatvet Ullmann on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 12 September 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Helen Schatvet Ullmann, FASG, CG where we discussed her work doing New England genealogical research.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Hartford County Connecticut County Court Minutes Vol. 3 & 4 and Colony of Connecticut Minutes of the Court of Assistants 1669-1711, both published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, are available from AmericanAncestors.org.

Helen suggested that researchers try writing up their finding in Register style in a word processor while conducting their research. You can find a Register template (for free) on the AmericanAncestors.org website.

Colony of Connecticut Minutes of the Court of AssistantsHelen Ullmann, FASG, CG  has written numerous books including (but not limited to):

The New England Historical Genealogical Society, the publisher of several of Helen’s books, donated two copies of her books which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Massachusetts and California. A big thank you to the New England Historical Genealogical Society for their generosity.

Show Notes: From Deference to Defiance with Roger Thompson

Roger ThompsonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 8 August 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Roger Thompson about his book From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692, published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS), is available for purchase from NEHGS, Amazon.com and other booksellers.

From Deference to Defiance focuses on the history of Charlestown during this early critical time period. This comprehensive work covers topics such as where Charlestown residents originated in England, land issues, its relationship to the sea with a strong shipping industry, women, church, violence and the Glorious Revolution. Much of the content is presented in the form of case studies giving an up-front personal look at individual residents of Charlestown. At first glance you might think this is simply a book about Charlestown, Massachusetts. In reality, it’s a primer on understanding colonial New Englanders in the 1600s. Every 17th century scholar, researcher and genealogist should read this book.

In addition to From Deference to Defiance, Roger Thompson has written:

The New England Historic Genealogical Society, the publisher of From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Massachusetts and California. A big thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity.

Show Notes – Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, MA

The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Mass by Scott C. Steward and Christopher C. Child on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 25 April 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Scott C. Steward and Christopher C. Child about the book The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts, published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society online bookstore.

Scott C. Steward and Christopher C. Child, the authors of the book, both work for the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Scott is the Director of Publications and Chris is  Genealogist of the Newbury Street Press.

Judge John Lowell was not the immigrant ancestor for the Lowell family which hailed from England but he was the progenitor of a long line of successful Lowell descendants. You can learn more about Judge John Lowell on Wikipedia.

During the program we discussed writing up a family genealogy. Chris and Scott mentioned the helpful book Genealogical Writing in the 21st Century, 2nd edition (Boston: NEHGS, 2006). There is also, a register style template created by Helen Schatvet Ullmann which is available free for download (you do not need to be a member to access this).

The New England Historic Genealogical Society, the publisher of The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts, donated two copies of the book which were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Utah and Georgia. A big thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

You can read the full story of the cookbook (as mentioned during the show) — and see pictures of Gommy in her Lopez garden and even a link to one of her recipes — on the Heirloom Registry’s blog.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

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Show Notes – New England Captives Carried to Canada

New England Captives Carried to Canada with Donald R. Friary on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 11 April 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Donald R. Friary about the book New England Captives Carried to Canada.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

New England Captives Carried to Canada, published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society online bookstore.

Donald R. Friary wrote the foreward to New England Captives Carried to Canada. This is a re-release of the 1925 book by Emma Lewis Coleman. Donald Friary was the Executive Director of Historic Deerfield for 27 years. Deerfield is well known for being the site of a massive French and Indian raid in 1704 where 112 captives were forced to march to Quebec.

Historic Deerfield is now a collection of historic house museums located in one of the most picturesque neighborhoods in New England. It is located about a half hour north of Springfield, Massachusetts. On the same street is the historic Deerfield Inn in case you decide to make a visit.

The New England Historic Genealogical Society, the publisher of New England Captives Carried to Canada, donated two copies of the book which were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Arizona and England. A big thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio