FC 99 Monuments Man Deane Keller with Laura Macaluso

Deane Keller with CosimoThis week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Laura Macaulso, curator of “An Artist at War: Deane Keller, New Haven’s Monuments Man,” an exhibit at the New Haven Museum in New Haven, Connecticut. This week’s discussion is a little different because we are not speaking about a particular book. Instead we are talking with Laura about Deane Keller and all she leaned about him researching for this exhibit.

Bio – Laura Macaluso

Laura A. Macaluso was trained in art history, museums and cultural heritage and spent Deane Keller Dog Tagsher 20s and 30s studying, working and traveling. Now, she is getting down to some writing, including a new book on portraits as a sideline to her dissertation on city identity and public art.

Laura remembers three important places in her travels: Florence, where she earned a Master’s degree in art history, Edinburgh, where she was married, and southern Africa, where she was a Fulbright Scholar. She plans to visit Egypt when she earns her PhD from Salve Regina University.

She is a recent transplant to central Virginia, where her husband Jeffrey Nichols directs Thomas Jefferson’s retreat home, Poplar Forest (www.poplarforest.org). They enjoy visiting historic sites and parks, but mostly sitting by the fire with two cats and a dog.

Publication Info Connecticut Explored Winter 2014

Title: Connecticut Explored Magazine

Publication Date: Winter 2014

Article: “New Haven’s Monuments Man,” by Laura A. Macaluso

The Interview

Deane Keller drawing - Leaning Tower of PisaThe Monuments Men were a real unit during WWII tasked with saving the great art of Europe from Hitler and the Nazis. The Monuments Men became better known after a book of the same title by Robert Edsel and then further by the recent movie starring George Clooney. There were three Monuments Men from Connecticut, one of them, Yale Professor Deane Keller is currently being featured (December 2014-May 2015) in an exhibit at the New Haven Museum in New Haven, Connecticut. In this interview Laura Macaluso and I discuss Deane Keller’s life, his talents and his success as a Monument’s Man and how he became beloved by the people of Italy for protecting their heritage.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

A one-year subscription to Connecticut Explored Magazine is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Connecticut Explored.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week [leave comment below to be entered to win]

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Connecticut Explored Magazine for their generosity in donating the subscription!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/monuments-man-deane-keller

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 99)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 99 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 83 – Rebecca Dickinson with Marla R. Miller

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Marla R. Miller, author of the book Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman.

Bio – Marla R. Miller

Marla R. Miller, a historian of early American women and work, has made a career uncovering the lives of women who left little in the way of documentary record. She is a professor of Marla Miller on Fieldstone Commonhistory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and directs the Public History program there. She has won the Organization of American Historians’ Lerner-Scott Prize for the best dissertation on women’s history and the 1997 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Colonial History.

This is Marla’s second visit to Fieldstone Common. She appeared on the July 4th, 2013 episode to talk about her other book, Betsy Ross and the Making of America.

Book Summary

Rebecca Dickinson’s powerful voice, captured through excerpts from the pages of her journal, allows colonial and revolutionary-era New England to come alive. Dickinson’s life illustrates the dilemmas faced by many Americans in the decades before, during, and after the American Revolution, as well as the paradoxes presented by an unmarried woman who earned her own living and made her own way in the small town where she was born. Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman, uses Dickinson’s world as a lens to introduce readers to the everyday experience of living in the colonial era and the social, cultural, and economic challenges faced in the transformative decades surrounding the American Revolution.

Publication InfoRebecca Dickinson with Marla Miller on Fieldstone Common

Title: Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman

Publisher: Westview Press (2014)

Trade Paperback; 194 pages with a list or primary sources, end notes, bibliographic essay and an index.

Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

Marla and I talk about the diary that acted as the background for Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman. Rebecca lived through American Revolution to see the birth of the United States. She remained unmarried and supported herself independently as a gown maker. Though she had several proposals of marriage she rejected them. Her life was a careful balance of conscious independence and loneliness.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Womanwas given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Westview Press.

The winner is:

  • Debra Cravens of Wisconsin

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Westview Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/rebecca-dickinson-marla-miller

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 83)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 83 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 68 Colonial New England Speech with Joan Bines

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Joan Bines, author of the book Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now.

Bio

Joan Bines received her BA from Brandeis University and her doctorate from the Words They Lived ByUniversity of Virginia in American diplomatic history. After teaching for many years, she became director of the Golden Ball Tavern Museum, a gracious 1760s Georgian tavern and home in Weston, Massachusetts. Here with a dedicated group of volunteers, she oversaw and continues to oversee the preservation of the museum and to build its education and outreach programs. Here also, she has been able to indulge her love of words, their histories and meanings, as well as her love photography.

You can learn more about Joan’s photography at her website as well as check out information about the Golden Ball Tavern Museum.

Book Summary

Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now offers an entertaining and informative peephole into colonial New England life, as well as giving insight into a bit of our own.

Book InfoWords They Lived By

Title: Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now

Publisher: IBJ Book Publishing (2013)

Trade paperback; 147 pages with bibliography, index and lots of color and BxW photos and illustrations.

Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we talk about the many words used in colonial speech that are still in use now but may have different meanings. Words like diaper, alarm, neglige, loggerhead and many more. We also discuss the Golden Ball Tavern Museum and the library and archives resources available there.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Joan Bines.

The winners are:

  • Cathy Blancato of Maryland
  • Susan LeBlanc of Oregon

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to Joan for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/colonial-new-england-speech-with-joan-bines

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 68)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 68 is the number of the episode.

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For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

From Deference to Defiance is now a Podcast!

Podcast now availableThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Roger Thompson discussing his book From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692 is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples now a Podcast

Podcast now availableThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Lucianne Lavin discussing her book Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples: What Archeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio