Show Notes: The Philadelphia Nativists Riots with Kenneth Milano

The Philadelphia Nativist Riots with Kenneth Milano on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 19 September 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Kenneth W. Milano about his book The Philadelphia Nativist Riots: Irish Kensington.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

The Philadelphia Nativist Riots, published by the History Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Kenneth W, MilanoThe Nativists were an anti-immigrant group in mid 19th-century America who particularly channeled their hostility against Irish Catholic immigrants. In Philadelphia in 1844 that hostility erupted into a 3 day riot in the Kensington section of the city.

You can learn more about Ken at his website.

Kenneth Milano has written six books including:

In addition to being an author, Ken Milano is also a professional genealogist who focuses on Philadelphia. If you have ancestors from the Philadelphia area you can contact Ken for more information from his website.

The History Press, the publisher of all of Ken’s books, donated two copies of The Philadelphia Nativist Riots which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Michigan and New Hampshire. A big thank you to the History Press for their generosity.

 

The Philadelphia Nativist Riots with Kenneth Milano

The Philadelphia Nativist Riots with Kenneth Milano on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 19 September 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Kenneth Milano, author of The Philadelphia Nativist Riots.

The outskirts of Philadelphia seethed with tension in the spring of 1844. By May 6, the situation between the newly arrived Irish Catholics and members of the anti-immigrant Nativist Party took an explosively violent turn. When the Irish asked to have their children excused from reading the Protestant version of the Bible in local public schools, the nativists held a protest. The Irish pushed back. For three days, riots scorched the streets of Kensington. Though the immigrants first had the upper hand, the nativists soon put the community to the torch. Those who fled were shot. Two Catholic churches burned to the ground, along with several blocks of houses, stores, a nunnery and a Catholic school. Local historian Kenneth W. Milano traces this tumultuous history from the preceding hostilities through the bloody skirmishes and finally to the aftermath of arrests and trials. Discover a remarkably intimate and compelling view of the riots with stories of individuals on both sides of the conflict that rocked Kensington.

The Philadelphia Nativist Riots with Kenneth Milano on Fieldstone CommonKenneth W. Milano is a historical & genealogical researcher. He was born and raised in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Milano received his degree in History from Temple University. His 2006-2011 column “The Rest is History” is well remembered by readers of Star Newspapers. He is one of the founders of the Kensington History Project.

 

Show Notes – Betsy Ross with Marla Miller

Here are some items that were mentioned during the 4 July 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Marla Miller about her book Betsy Ross and the Making of America.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Betsy Ross and the Making of America, published by St. Martin’s Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Miller on Fieldstone CommonYou can learn more about Marla Miller at her website.

Marla Miller’s first book was The Needle’s Eye: Women And Work in the Age of Revolution (UMass Press, 2006). Her next book, to be published August 2013, is Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman.

Betsy Ross and the Making of America takes a look beyond the myth of Betsy Ross to discover the real woman behind the legend. Betsy Ross was a Quaker from Philadelphia. She was born Elizabeth Griscom, daughter of Samuel Griscom and Rebecca James. Her immigrant ancestor Andrew Griscom arrive in the colonies in 1680.

Betsy was married first to John Ross with whom she had no children. She then married Joseph Ashburn. They had two daughters but one of which died as an infant. Her third marriage to John Claypoole was the longest lasting until his death in 1817. They had many daughters together. Betsy died January 30, 1836.

Betsy Ross with Marla Miller of Fieldstone CommonThere are few extant records specifically about Betsy Ross, though her account books should exist.  Perhaps they exist today in some attic in the midwest? If you’re a descendant of Betsy Ross or you have materials with the name Elizabeth Claypoole or Betsy Claypoole written on them please contact me or contact Marla Miller directly. Marla would be very interested in seeing those items!

St. Martin’s Press, the publisher of Betsy Ross and the Making of America, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Kentucky and Massachusetts. A big thank you to the St. Martin’s Press for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Betsy Ross and the Making of America with Marla Miller

Betsy Ross with Marla Miller of Fieldstone CommonBROADCAST: THURSDAY, 4 July 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Marla Miller, author of Betsy Ross and the Making of America.

Beyond the legend of the creation of the American flag, we know very little about the facts of Betsy Ross’ life. Perhaps with one snip of her scissors she convinced the nation’s future first president that five-pointed stars suited better than six. Perhaps not. Miller recovers for the first time the full story of Betsy Ross, sharing the woman as she truly was. Miller pieces together the fascinating life of this little-known and much beloved figure, showing that she is important to our history not just because she made a flag, but because she embraced the resistance movement with vigor, reveled in its triumphs, and suffered its consequences.

Marla Miller, a historian of early American women and work, has made a career Betsy Ross with Marla Miller of Fieldstone Commonuncovering the lives of women who left little in the way of documentary record. She is a professor of history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and directs the Public History program there. She has won the Organization of American Historians’ Lerner-Scott Prize for the best dissertation on women’s history and the 1997 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Colonial History.