Show Notes – One Colonial Woman’s World with Michelle Coughlin

One Woman's Colonial World with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 7 March 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin, author of One Colonial Woman’s World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

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You can learn more about the book at the One Colonial Woman’s World website. The site also includes a list of appearance that Michelle Marchetti Coughlin will be making this year.

One Colonial Woman’s World, published by The University of Massachusetts Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

The Chandler family was originally from Roxbury, Massachusetts. In 1686 a number of Roxbury families including the Chandlers settled “New Roxbury” which later became Woodstock, Connecticut.

Mehetabel Chandler’s maternal side, the Douglases, settled in New London. Mehetabel married John Coit, also of New London, Connecticut.

During the week of the show it was discovered that Fieldstone Common host, Marian Pierre-Louis, is a descendant of Mehetabel Chandler Coit’s parents John Chandler and Elizabeth Douglas continuing down through the line of Mehetabel’s brother, John Chandler and his wife, Mary Raymond. Fieldstone Common listener Heather Rojo is also a descendant through Mehetabel’s sister, Hannah Chandler who married Moses Draper.

The University of Massachusetts Press, the publisher of One Colonial Woman’s World, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.  A big thank you to The University of Massachusetts Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

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One Colonial Woman’s World with Michelle Coughlin

LIVE: THURSDAY, 7 March 2013 at 1:00pm ESTOne Woman's Colonial World with Michelle Marchetti Coulghlin on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Michelle Marchetti Coughlin, author of One Colonial Woman’s World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit.

One Colonial Woman’s World reconstructs the life of Mehetabel Chandler Coit (1673–1758), the author of what may be the earliest surviving diary by an American woman. A native of Roxbury, Massachusetts, who later moved to Connecticut, Mehetabel began her diary at the age of fifteen and kept it intermittently until she was well into her seventies. A previously overlooked resource, the diary contains entries on a broad range of topics as well as poems, recipes, folk and herbal medical remedies, religious meditations, financial accounts, and even some humor. An extensive collection of letters by Mehetabel and her female relatives has also survived, shedding further light on her experiences.

It is clear from the surviving writings that Mehetabel lived a rich and varied life, not only running a household and raising a family, but reading, writing, traveling, transacting business, and maintaining a widespread network of family, social, and commercial connections. While her experiences were circumscribed by gender norms of the day, she took a lively interest in the world around her and played an active role in her community.

Mehetabel’s long life covered an eventful period in American history, and this book explores the numerous—and sometimes surprising—ways in which her personal experiences were linked to broader social and political developments. It also provides One Woman's Colonial World with Michelle Marchetti Coughlin on Fieldstone Commoninsight into the lives of countless other colonial American women whose history remains largely untold.

Michelle Marchetti Coughlin is an independent scholar and former editor who holds graduate degrees in history and English and American Literature. She lives south of Boston with her husband Mark and is currently working on an article about Mehetabel’s mother’s poem.

For more details and upcoming schedule see: http://FieldstoneCommon.blogspot.com

 

Show Notes – Carved in Stone with the Gilsons

Carved in Stone with Thomas & William Gilson on Fieldstone Common

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

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Following are some items that were mentioned during the 24 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Thomas and William Gilson, authors of Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

William Gilson

William Gilson is a writer now based in England. Thomas Gilson is a photographer based in New York. You can view sample images of the gravestone photos from the book on Thomas Gilson’s website

Thomas Gilson

The book Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones, published by the Wesleyan University Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

Three well-known gravestone researchers/authors were mentioned during the interview: Harriette Merrifield Forbes, Allan Ludwig and Vincent Luti

A great reference tool for viewing early 20th century black and white photographs of New England gravestones, many of which were photographed before stone deterioration, is the Farber Gravestone Collection at the American Antiquarian Society

A great place to learn more about gravestones and their carvers is the Association for Gravestone Studies. Be sure to check out their scholarly publication, Markers.

You can view gravestone photos by Marian Pierre-Louis on her blog, the Symbolic Past.

The Wesleyan University Press, the publisher of Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones, donated a copy of the book that was given as “door prize” during the live show. The copy went to a listener in Massachusetts. A big thank you to the Wesleyan University Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site. 

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Carved in Stone with the Gilsons

LIVE: THURSDAY, 24 January 2013 at 1:00pm EST

This Thursday on Fieldstone Common we will speak with authors and brothers Thomas and William Gilson about their book Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones.

Gravestones are colonial America’s earliest sculpture and they provide a unique physical link to the European people who settled here. Carved in Stone is an elegant collection of over 80 fine duotone photographs, each a personal meditation on an old stone carving, and on New England’s past, where these stones tell stories about death at sea, epidemics such as small pox, the loss of children, and a grim view of the afterlife. The essay is a graceful narrative that explores a long personal involvement with the stones and their placement in New England landscape, and attempts to trace the curious and imperfectly documented story of carvers. Brief quotes from early New England writers accompany the images, and captions provide basic information about each stone. These meditative portraits present an intimate view of figures from New England graveyards and will be enjoyed by anyone with an interest in early Americana and fine art photography.

Thomas E. Gilson is the author of The New England Farm, a highly praised book of photographs. He taught black and white photography in Vermont for 17 years and was managing editor and photographer for the New England Farmer. His photographs have been widely published and exhibited.

William Gilson attended the University of Connecticut, and his writing has been published in journals and magazines including New England Review, Orion, and Poetry Salzburg Review.

The Gilson brothers were born and raised in Connecticut.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Mofford

The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 17 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Juliet Haines Mofford, author of The Devil Made Me Do It: Crime and Punishment in Early New England.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can connect with Juliet Mofford Haines on Facebook and LinkedIn. Juliet also gave out her email address during the show. Have a listen to the show to get that.

The book The Devil Made Me Do It, published by the Globe Pequot Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com

Juliet has published eleven books some of which include  

  • Cry “witch”: the Salem witch trials, 1692 (Discovery Enterprises, 1995) 
  • Greater Lawrence, a bibliography : an annotated guide to the history of Andover, Methuen, Lawrence, and North Andover (Merrimack Valley Textiles Museum, 1978) The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone Common
  • The history of North Parish Church of North Andover, 1645-1974: and firm thine ancient vow (Mofford, 1975). 

She has also written a number of history books targeted toward juvenile readers.

One of the places that Juliet mentions during the interview is the Old Gaol in York, Maine.  Juliet not only worked there previously but she also writes about it in the book. The Old Gaol is part of the The Old York Historical Society which has  number of historical buildings which you can visit.

The Globe Pequot Press, the publisher of The Devil Made Me Do It: Crime and Punishment in Early New England, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show. One copy went to a listener in Colorado and the other to a listener in Massachusetts. A big thank you to the Globe Pequot Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012. Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.


Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Haines Mofford

LIVE: THURSDAY, 17 January 2013 at 1:00pm EST

This Thursday on Fieldstone Common we will speak author Juliet Haines Mofford about her book The Devil Made Me Do It! Crime and Punishment in Early New England.

Whether it was Sabbath-breaking, blasphemy, or public drunkenness, colonial laws were strict and frequently broken, and those who broke them could expect swift punishment. Laws were designed to reflect Puritan ideas of ensuring God’s blessings upon the community, as well as to tightly maintain order in ways that would benefit the entire colony. Each neighbor had a role in preserving family values and keeping the community safe from “railing scolds,” vagabonds, malefactors, and malefic witches.

Some of the ways that seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century New England communities dealt with murder and mayhem seem brutal to modern sensibilities. Today, Joan Andrews would not be forced to wear a T for theft upon her bodice for placing stones in the firkin of butter she sold a client. And Lydea Abbot would certainly not be made to suffer in the stocks for “uttering ten profain curses.”

The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone Common
Juliet Haines Mofford

Drawing from early court dockets, diaries, sermons, gaolers’ records, and other primary sources, the chapters in this book investigate crimes like these and illuminate the social and political causes behind legal cases from a time when accused felons often pleaded in their own defense: “The Devil made me do it!”

Juliet Haines Mofford is a historian and museum educator based in Maine. Two of her eleven books received national awards from the American Association for State and Local History. Her feature articles have appeared in the Boston Globe and many other publications. She served on the educational board of the American Association of Museums.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – New England Genealogy with David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert, A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries on Fieldstone Common
David Allen Lambert

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 10 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with David Allen Lambert, author of A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

You can learn more about David Allen Lambert from the New England Historic Genealogical Society website. You can also follow David on Facebook

The book A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries (2nd edition) is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Please note that the 2nd edition is not available from Amazon.com, only the 1st edition is for sale there. If you purchase the book you definitely want to get the 2nd edition.

David is the tribal genealogist for the Massachuset-Ponkapoag Indians of Massachusetts. You can learn more about the Punkapoag from the Canton, Massachusetts Historical Society website and from the Stoughton History website. The Ponkapoag also have their own website. You can learn more about tribes of Massachusetts in general from the Native American Tribes of Massachusetts website.

David has written several books about the history of Stoughton, Massachusetts include:

  • Vital records of Stoughton, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1850 (Mass. Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2008)
  •  Stoughton, Images of America series (Arcadia Pub., 2001)

He also created the Stoughton History website which is now the site of the Stoughton, Massachusetts Historical Society.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

New England Genealogy with David Allen Lambert


This Thursday on Fieldstone Common we will speak well known New England Genealogist David Allen Lambert. During this interview we will discuss some of David’s favorite research topics such as New England cemeteries, Native Americans and African Americans. We’ll probably even talk a bit about baseball too!


David has been a staff member at the New England Historic Genealogical Society since 1993, having been a member previously. His interest in genealogy started at the young age of seven, and has increased over the past four decades. He has published several articles in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register; the New Hampshire Genealogical Record, Rhode Island Roots, The Mayflower Descendant, and New England Ancestorsmagazine.
His genealogical expertise includes New England and Atlantic Canadian records of the 17th through 21st century; military records; and Native American and African American genealogical research in New England. He has published A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries (NEHGS, 2009), and ), and various volumes of his hometown of Stoughton, Massachusetts. He recently collaborated with historian Maureen Taylor on a volume of photographic images of the Revolutionary war period – The Last Muster (Kent State University, 2010). 
David has been a Civil War re-enactor for the 12th Massachusetts Infantry. He is a Life Member of the New Hampshire Society of the Cincinnati. He is currently the tribal genealogist for the Massachuset-Punkapoag Indians of Massachusetts. He serves as Vice President and served on the Board of Directors for the Stoughton Historical Society, of which he has been a member since the age of 10. David is currently authoring the vital, church and cemetery records for the town of Stoughton, Massachusetts.
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – In Death Lamented with Sarah Nehama

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 3 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Sarah Nehama, author of In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

You can learn more about Sarah Nehama and her jewelery business from her web page. You can also follow her on Twitter.

The book In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry is available for purchase from the Amazon.com.

In addition to being a book, In Death Lamented is an exhibit at the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston, Massachusetts. The exhibit is available for viewing through January 31, 2013. It is well worth the visit! 

The Massachusetts Historical Society, the publisher of In Death Lamented, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show. One copy went to a listener in Massachusetts and the other to a listener in Virginia. A big thank you to the Massachusetts Historical Society for  their generosity!


Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

In Death Lamented with Sarah Nehama

In Death Lamented by Sarah Nehama on Fieldstone Common
In Death Lamented by Sarah Nehama



This Thursday on Fieldstone Common we will speak with jeweler, author and curator Sarah Nehama about In Death Lamented, an exhibit on mourning jewelry.

Sarah Nehama on Fieldstone CommonMourning jewels, tangible expressions of love and sorrow, are the focus of In Death Lamented on view at the Massachusetts Historical Society (MHS) through 31 January 2013. The exhibition features more than 80 objects representing some of the best examples of this type of jewelry. Exhibition highlights include the Society’s Adams-Winthrop commemorative seal ring containing the braided hair of John Quincy Adams and a gold memorial ring for Queen Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach.

The jewelry included in the exhibition illustrates some of the most exemplary types, from early gold bands with death’s head iconography to bejeweled brooches and the intricately woven hairwork pieces of the Civil War era. Displayed within the larger context of the mourning rites that our New England ancestors brought with them, these relics attest to the basic human emotion of grief and the need to remain connected to those gone before.

A full-color companion book, In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry features photographs and descriptions of all of the Nehama and MHS pieces, along with historical and stylistic backgrounds and essays pertaining to cultural practices around death and mourning in England and America.

About the Guest Curator and Author
Sarah Nehama is a designer/jeweler who works in precious metals and gemstones. She sells her work through galleries, at juried shows, and to private customers. Sarah has a degree in art history and studied jewelry making in Boston and New York. She is a collector of antique mourning and sentimental jewelry and currently resides in Boston.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis