FC 88 Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England with Corin Hirsch

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Corin Hirsch, the author of the book Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England: From Flips & Rattle-Skulls to Switchel & Spruce Beer.

Bio – Corin Hirsch

Corin Hirsch is a drinks writer as well as associate editor and writer for Convene Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England with Corin Hirsch on Fieldstone CommonMagazine. Previously she was an award-winning culinary writer at Seven Days, the alternative weekly newspaper in Burlington, Vermont where she profiled chefs, farmers, cheese makers, brewers and trends in the hotbed of farm-to-table fare, and developed seasonal recipes and cocktails. Her work has also appeared in a range of regional publications. She is a member of the Association for Food Journalists, and recently won a 2nd Place for Best Food Writing from the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies.

Corin learned to pull a pint of Schlitz (for her grandfather) at the age of six, and she used to tend bar inside a sixteenth-century English pub. She has written about craft beer for Serious Eats and also ghost-blogs and writes in the wine world. This is her first book.

Book Summary

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farm workers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. Tipples at breakfast, lunch, teatime and dinner were the norm, and low-alcohol hard cider was sometimes even a part of children’s lives. This burgeoning cocktail culture reflected the New World’s abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops. This plentiful drinking sustained a slew of smoky taverns and inns–watering holes that became vital meeting places and the nexuses of unrest as the Revolution brewed. New England food and drinks writer Corin Hirsch explores the origins and taste of the favorite potations of early Americans and offers some modern-day recipes to revive them today.

Publication InfoForgotten Drinks of Colonial New England with Corin Hirsch on Fieldstone Common

Title: Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England: From Flips & Rattle-Skulls to Switchel & Spruce Beer

Publisher: The History Press (2014)

Trade Paperback; 126 pages with a glossary, sources, an index, recipes and lots of photos and illustrations.

Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England: From Flips & Rattle-Skulls to Switchel & Spruce Beer is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Corin and I dig into the how, where, why and when of Colonial drinking! Did you know that Harvard University had its own brewery?  Have you ever heard of Flip, Grog, Stone Fence or Rattle-Skulls? We’ll explain what those are during the show. We also discuss what Benjamin Franklin did every time he entered a pub. Get comfortable and join for this fun discussion!

Links mentioned during the interview

  • The Inn at Weathersfield (VT) – Take a drinks class with Corin Hirsch in a beautiful 21 acres setting in Vermont. Date of class: December 6, 2014

Prize Winner

One copy of Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winner is:

  • Larry McGrail of Arizona

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/forgotten-drinks-colonial-new-england-corin-hirsch

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 87)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 87 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 68 Colonial New England Speech with Joan Bines

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Joan Bines, author of the book Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now.

Bio

Joan Bines received her BA from Brandeis University and her doctorate from the Words They Lived ByUniversity of Virginia in American diplomatic history. After teaching for many years, she became director of the Golden Ball Tavern Museum, a gracious 1760s Georgian tavern and home in Weston, Massachusetts. Here with a dedicated group of volunteers, she oversaw and continues to oversee the preservation of the museum and to build its education and outreach programs. Here also, she has been able to indulge her love of words, their histories and meanings, as well as her love photography.

You can learn more about Joan’s photography at her website as well as check out information about the Golden Ball Tavern Museum.

Book Summary

Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now offers an entertaining and informative peephole into colonial New England life, as well as giving insight into a bit of our own.

Book InfoWords They Lived By

Title: Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now

Publisher: IBJ Book Publishing (2013)

Trade paperback; 147 pages with bibliography, index and lots of color and BxW photos and illustrations.

Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we talk about the many words used in colonial speech that are still in use now but may have different meanings. Words like diaper, alarm, neglige, loggerhead and many more. We also discuss the Golden Ball Tavern Museum and the library and archives resources available there.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Joan Bines.

The winners are:

  • Cathy Blancato of Maryland
  • Susan LeBlanc of Oregon

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to Joan for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/colonial-new-england-speech-with-joan-bines

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 68)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 68 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 65 A Little Commonwealth with John Demos

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Professor John Demos, author of the books The Unredeemed Captive; Entertaining Satan; and A Little Commonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony. In this episode we discuss these books as well as his career and the state of history in America.

Bio

John Demos was born and raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He graduated from A Little Commonwealth with John Demos on Fieldstone CommonHarvard College, and received his graduate training at Oxford, the University of California at Berkeley, and Harvard. He has taught at Brandeis and at Yale, where he is the Samuel Knight Professor Emeritus of American History. Some of his books include A Little Commonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony, Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England, for which he received the 1983 Bancroft Prize, and Past, Present, and Personal: The Family and the Life Course in American History. Demos’ The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America received the National Book Award in 1994. More recently he published Circles and Lines: The Shape of Life in Early America.

Book Summaries

Professor John Demos is an expert in early American history. His book A Little The Unredeemed Captive by John DemosCommonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony recreates the life and family structures of members of Plymouth colony in the 17th century. In Entertaining Satan Demos provides an overview of witchcraft in New England in the 17th and 18th centuries. His work The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America focuses on the 1704 Indian raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts. The book describes the taking of the Williams family and the choice of daughter Eunice to remain among the Mohawk community.

Book Info

Books by John Demos:

The Interview

In this interview we discuss how John Demos came to be a history professor and the influence of his years in the Peace Corps in Ghana, West Africa. We talk about the influence of his book as well as those of three colleagues Ken Lockridge, Philip Greven, and Michael Zuckerman who all wrote seminal New England town studies in the early 1970s which changed the focus of Early American history.

We discussed three of his books – A Little Commonwealth, The Unredeemed Captive and Entertaining Satan and the influences they had on interpreting Early American history. Demos credits Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum for their theory of explaining the Salem Witch Trials on an economic basis in their book Salem Possessed.

His later research into witchcraft was metaphorical as exemplified by the play The Crucible by Arthur Miller.

John has grown to love material culture and that has manifested in his passion for collecting antiques.

He has had a great influence on a generation of new writer-historians including Jill Lepore, Allegra di Bonaventura, Jack Larkin, Jane Kamensky, Wendy Warren, Peter Silver and many more.

In early 2014 be on the lookout for his next book The Heathen School (Knopf, 2014).

Bonus List

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 65)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 65 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 063 Mysteries and Legends New England with Diana Ross McCain

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Diana Ross McCain, author of the book Mysteries and Legends New England: True Stories of the Unsolved and Unexplained.

Bio

Mysteries and Legends New England with Diana Ross McCain on Fieldstone CommonDiana Ross McCain has written about Connecticut’s past for more than 25 years and holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in history. A frequent contributor to Early American Life and Connecticut magazines, and The Hartford Courant, McCain wrote the award-winning publication To All on Equal Terms, the story of Connecticut’s official state heroine, Prudence Crandall. She is the head of the Research Center at the Connecticut Historical Society.

Book Summary

Have you ever heard of the Leather Man who wandered a 365 mile route through Connecticut and Eastern New York? Is there any truth to the tale of Captain Kidd’s treasure being buried in New England? What was the terrifying fear of 19th century Americans? Mysteries and Legends New England contains thirteen mind-boggling tales from Maine, New Hampshire, Connecticut and Rhode Island. From vampires to an angel, a ghost rapper to a phantom ship, Mysteries and Legends of New England pulls back the curtain on some of the region’s most fascinating and compelling stories.

Book InfoMysteries and Legends New England with Diana Ross McCain on Fieldstone Common

Title: Mysteries and Legends New England: True Stories of the Unsolved and Unexplained

Publisher: Globe Pequot Press (2009)

Trade paperback; 181 pages with bibliography, index and some BxW photos and illustrations.

Mysteries and Legends New England: True Stories of the Unsolved and Unexplained is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we explore in-depth the story of the mysterious Leather Man who walked a 34 day route through 365 miles of Connecticut and Eastern New York and how he became a familiar face and a legend during his lifetime. We also look into the curious but very real fear that 19th century Americans had of being buried alive despite the fact that there were very few documented cases of it actually occurring. Are you familiar with the story of Captiain Kidd? He was more than just a pirate legend! He was a gentleman with a wife and daughter living in New York City until things went very, very wrong. And let’s not forget the discussion on concealed garments and shoes. The tradition, brought over from England, was that these items would be tucked into the walls of houses during construction to ward off evil spirits or to bring good luck.

At the end of the interview Diana tells us about the Connecticut Historical Society and the amazing historical and genealogical resources available there. She also mentions some of her other books which are listed here:

Prize Winners

Two copies of Mysteries and Legends New England were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the Globe Pequot Press.

The winners are:

  • Kim Myers of Oregon
  • Connie Pine of Texas

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the Globe Pequot Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 063)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 63 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 062 Vampires: Food for the Dead with Michael Bell

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Michael Bell, author of the book Food for the Dead: On the Trail of New England’s Vampires.

Bio

Michael E. Bell was awarded a Ph.D. in Folklore from Indiana University at Bloomington, where his dissertation topic was African-American voodoo practices. He also has an M.A. Food for the Dead: On the Trail of New England's Vampires with Michael Bell on Fieldstone Commonin Folklore and Mythology from the University of California at Los Angeles, and a B.A. in Anthropology and Archaeology from the University of Arizona, Tucson. For more than twenty-five years, Bell was the Consulting Folklorist at the Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission in Providence, Rhode Island. He has also taught folklore, English, and anthropology at several colleges and universities. Dr. Bell has served as a scholar or consultant on numerous projects, particularly those concerned with folklore, folk art, oral history, and humanities programs for young adults. These projects have taken a variety of forms, including primary research and fieldwork, exhibits, publications, school curricula, workshops and lectures, festivals, performances, and media productions. In addition to many state and local grants, project funding sources have included the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, and the Smithsonian Institution. Bell has completed a variety of publications and media productions on topics ranging from local legends and the magical black cat bone to the occupational folklife of the shell fishing industry of Narragansett Bay. He lives in Pawtuxet Village, near Providence, Rhode Island.

You can learn more about Michael at his website www.foodforthedeadcom.com. Also, check out his schedule of upcoming appearances.

Book Summary

For nineteenth-century New Englanders, “vampires” lurked behind tuberculosis. To try to rid their houses and communities from the scourge of the wasting disease, families sometimes relied on folk practices, including exhuming and consuming the bodies of the deceased. Author and folklorist Michael E. Bell spent twenty years pursuing stories of the vampire in New England. While writers like H. P. Lovecraft, Henry David Thoreau, and Amy Lowell drew on portions of these stories in their writings, Bell brings the actual practices to light for the first time. He shows that the belief in vampires was widespread, and, for some families, lasted well into the twentieth century. With humor, insight, and sympathy, he uncovers story upon story of dying men, women, and children who believed they were food for the dead.

Book InfoFood for the Dead: On the Trail of New England's Vampires with Michael Bell on Fieldstone Common

Title: Food for the Dead: On the Trail of New England’s Vampires

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press (2011)

Trade paperback; 337 pages with appendices, end notes, works cited and some BxW photos.

Food for the Dead: On the Trail of New England’s Vampires is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Michael Bell and I explore the folk stories and folk beliefs behind the tragic epidemic of tuberculosis that lead some New Englanders to believe that they were being sickened and fed upon by the dead. New England vampirism differed greatly with traditional mass media images of Eastern European vampires.  In New England the practice arose from the fear and sense of helplessness in combating the spread of tuberculosis.  Yet it had the very real consequence of exhuming loved ones who had died from the disease and the ritual treatment of their bodies to put an end to further deaths of family members. Is vampirism in New England for real? Listen to the interview and decide for yourself!

Prize Winners

Two copies of Food for the Dead were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the Wesleyan University Press.

The winners are:

  • Kathy Hyde of California
  • Rice Jackson of Texas

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the Wesleyan University Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 062)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 62 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Show Notes: New England Research with Helen Ullmann

Helen Schatvet Ullmann on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 12 September 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Helen Schatvet Ullmann, FASG, CG where we discussed her work doing New England genealogical research.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Hartford County Connecticut County Court Minutes Vol. 3 & 4 and Colony of Connecticut Minutes of the Court of Assistants 1669-1711, both published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, are available from AmericanAncestors.org.

Helen suggested that researchers try writing up their finding in Register style in a word processor while conducting their research. You can find a Register template (for free) on the AmericanAncestors.org website.

Colony of Connecticut Minutes of the Court of AssistantsHelen Ullmann, FASG, CG  has written numerous books including (but not limited to):

The New England Historical Genealogical Society, the publisher of several of Helen’s books, donated two copies of her books which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Massachusetts and California. A big thank you to the New England Historical Genealogical Society for their generosity.

New England Research with Helen Ullmann

LIVE: THURSDAY, 12 September 2013 at 1:00pm EDTHelen Schatvet Ullmann on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews genealogist Helen Schatvet Ullmann, FASG, CG about her work and books on southern New England. Helen has transcribed several books on early Connecticut court records which are particularly helpful to genealogists and historians researching in the colonial period. We’ll be digging into the topics of colonial records, indexing, transcribing, editing and writing reports.

Helen Schatvet Ullmann, FASG, CG, is associate editor of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register and editor of NEHGS’s Western Massachusetts in 1790 project. She is the award-winning author of a number of compiled genealogies, including Descendants of Peter Mills of Windsor, Connecticut; Some Descendants of Roger Billings of Dorchester, Massachusetts; Descendants of John Mills of Stamford, Connecticut; A Mills and Kendall Family History; The Pierponts of Roxbury, Massachusetts; Some Descendants of John Helen Schatvet Ullmann on Fieldstone CommonSibley of Salem, Massachusetts; and Descendants of Richard Coman of Salem, Massachusetts and Providence, Rhode Island. In addition, she is the author of many genealogical articles, as well as the transcriber of Hartford County Court Minutes, Vols. 3 & 4, and Colony of Connecticut Minutes of the Court of Assistants, 1669–1711. Ullmann lives in Massachusetts.

 

 

The Indian Great Awakening with Linford Fisher

BlogPhoto-Fisher-coverLIVE: THURSDAY, 23 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Dr. Linford Fisher, author of The Indian Great Awakening: Religion and the Shaping of Native Culture in Early America.

The First Great Awakening was a time of heightened religious activity in the colonial New England. Among those whom the English settlers tried to convert to Christianity were the region’s native peoples. In this book, Linford Fisher tells the gripping story of American Indians’ attempts to wrestle with the ongoing realities of colonialism between the 1670s and 1820.

In particular, he looks at how some members of previously unevangelized Indian communities in Connecticut, Rhode Island, western Massachusetts, and Long Island adopted Christian practices, often joining local Congregational churches and receiving baptism. Far from passively sliding into the cultural and physical landscape after King Philip’s War, he argues, Native indivBlogPhoto-Fisher-headshotiduals and communities actively tapped into transatlantic structures of power to protect their land rights, welcomed educational opportunities for their children, and joined local white churches.

Charting this untold story of the Great Awakening and the resultant rise of an Indian Separatism and its effects on Indian cultures as a whole, this gracefully written book challenges long-held notions about religion and Native-Anglo-American interaction

Linford Fisher is an assistant professor of history at Brown University. He received his doctorate from Harvard University in 2008 and taught for a year in the Indiana University system before coming to Brown in 2009. His research field is early American history, including the history of religion in America and Native American history.

 

 

Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts with Melinde Lutz Byrne

LIVE: THURSDAY, 2 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDTLost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records with Melinde Lutz Byrne on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Melinde Lutz Byrne, CG, FASG, author of Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records, Essex County, Massachusetts, 1692-1745.

We will talk to Melinde about 17th and 18th century court records which are a rich source of information for historical and genealogical research.

Melinde Lutz Byrne, CG, FASG, is co-editor of the NGS Quarterly and Director of the Genealogical Research Certificate Program at Boston University. She is a cultural anthropologist and archivist by training and worked for Harvard’s Tozzer Anthropological Library. Melinde has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals. In 1993 a book she edited won several awards, including the Donald Lines Jacobus Award of Excellence. She has been an officer in state, regional, and national genealogical societies and has been Vice President of MGC. She currently serves as President of the American Society of Genealogists.

 

Show Notes – New England Captives Carried to Canada

New England Captives Carried to Canada with Donald R. Friary on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 11 April 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Donald R. Friary about the book New England Captives Carried to Canada.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

New England Captives Carried to Canada, published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society online bookstore.

Donald R. Friary wrote the foreward to New England Captives Carried to Canada. This is a re-release of the 1925 book by Emma Lewis Coleman. Donald Friary was the Executive Director of Historic Deerfield for 27 years. Deerfield is well known for being the site of a massive French and Indian raid in 1704 where 112 captives were forced to march to Quebec.

Historic Deerfield is now a collection of historic house museums located in one of the most picturesque neighborhoods in New England. It is located about a half hour north of Springfield, Massachusetts. On the same street is the historic Deerfield Inn in case you decide to make a visit.

The New England Historic Genealogical Society, the publisher of New England Captives Carried to Canada, donated two copies of the book which were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Arizona and England. A big thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

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