Show Notes: From Deference to Defiance with Roger Thompson

Roger ThompsonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 8 August 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Roger Thompson about his book From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

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From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692, published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS), is available for purchase from NEHGS, Amazon.com and other booksellers.

From Deference to Defiance focuses on the history of Charlestown during this early critical time period. This comprehensive work covers topics such as where Charlestown residents originated in England, land issues, its relationship to the sea with a strong shipping industry, women, church, violence and the Glorious Revolution. Much of the content is presented in the form of case studies giving an up-front personal look at individual residents of Charlestown. At first glance you might think this is simply a book about Charlestown, Massachusetts. In reality, it’s a primer on understanding colonial New Englanders in the 1600s. Every 17th century scholar, researcher and genealogist should read this book.

In addition to From Deference to Defiance, Roger Thompson has written:

The New England Historic Genealogical Society, the publisher of From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Massachusetts and California. A big thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity.

From Deference to Defiance with Roger Thompson

From Deference to Defiance with Roger Thompson on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 8 August 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Roger Thompson, author of From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692.

Step back in time to discover the people, the customs and the history of Charlestown, Massachusetts from its earliest years. From Deference to Defiance explores the conflicts and interactions of early settlers and brings them to life in a way that is often difficult during this time period. Much of the text is extracted from early court records whose tales are not only re-told but interpreted and put into the proper context for the time period.

Roger Thompson guest on Fieldstone CommonRoger Thompson is emeritus professor of American Colonial History at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England. His earlier works include Sex in Middlesex: Popular Mores in a Massachusetts County, 1649–1699 (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1986), Divided We Stand: Watertown 1630–80 (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2001), and Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in Seventeenth-Century New England (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2005).

 

Show Notes: The 300th Anniversary of the Old State House

The e Old State House in BostonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 25 July 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with historian Nathaniel Sheidley discussing the 300th Anniversary of the Old State House in Boston.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

You can learn more about the Old State House at its website.

The Old State House was the site of some of the most significant events leading up to the American Revolution. A Boston Historical survey declared the site the most significant public building in America. You can learn more about the history of the Old State House online and view a timeline of its history.

The Bostonian Society, the owner of the Old State House in Boston, donated two copies of The Boston Massacre by Robert Allison and two mouse pads with historic maps of Boston which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in New York and Tennessee. A big thank you to the Bostonian Society for their generosity.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History BookHeirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

The 300th Anniversary of the Old State House

THURSDAY, 28 July 2013 The 300th Anniversary of the Old State House in Boston

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Nathaniel Sheidley, the historian of the Old State House in Boston, Massachusetts.

This year the Old State House in Boston is celebrating its 300th anniversary. In celebration of this occasion Marian Pierre-Louis, host of Fieldstone Commons takes a tour on-site at the Old State House to learn about the significant contributions made to United States history, particularly around the time of the American Revolution. Marian is hosted on the tour by Old State House Historian, Nathaniel Sheidley. Join us for an up close look at American history.

Dr. Nathaniel Sheidley on Fieldstone CommonDr. Nathaniel Sheidley is the senior Historian and Director of Public History at the Bostonian Society. Originally from Connecticut, Dr. Sheidley attended Stanford University as an undergraduate and received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton University. Prior to joining the Bostonian Society, Dr. Sheidley was a member of the faculty at Wellesley College, where he taught American History for ten years. Dr. Sheidley has written and taught courses about a wide range of subjects, including Native American history, gender history, and the history of the American Revolution. Most recently, Dr. Sheidley authored the entry on the American Revolution for the 2011 edition of The World Book Encyclopedia. He is currently finishing a plate on the American Revolution in Boston for The Atlas of Boston History.

 

 

The North End with Alex R. Goldfeld

The North End with Alex R. Goldfeld on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 27 June 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Alex Goldfeld, author of The North End: A Brief History of Boston’s Oldest Neighborhood.

dfeld on Fieldstone Common

Alex R. Goldfeld photo credit: Heather Hartford

Before evolving into a thriving ‘Little Italy, Boston’s North End saw a tangled parade of military, religious and cultural change. Home to prominent historical figures such as Paul Revere, this neighborhood also played host to Samuel Adams and the North End Caucus- which masterminded the infamous Boston Tea Party- as well as the city’s first African-American church. From the Boston Massacre to Revere’s heroic ride, the North End embodies almost four centuries of strife and celebration, international influence and true American spirit. A small but storied stretch of land, the North End remains the oldest neighborhood in one of the country’s most historic cities.

For nearly a decade, Alex R. Goldfeld has been creating and leading tours of Boston’s historic neighborhoods, most notably the North End, Beacon Hill and Roxbury. He has conducted research and assisted in planning for local organizations, including the Nichols House Museum, the First Church in Roxbury and the Vilna Shul. Goldfeld also served as director of operations at Boston’s Museum of African American History, where he oversaw the visitor experience, managed the historic sites and facilitated tours of the Black Heritage Trail. He holds a Master of Arts in History from the University of Massachusetts Boston and lives with his family in the North End.

 

 

 

Show Notes – Judith Sargent Murray with Barbara Silberman

Barbara Silberman, President of the Sargent House Museum in Gloucester, MAFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 16 May 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Barbara Silberman about Judith Sargent Murray and the Sargent House Museum in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

This interview with Barbara Silberman, president of the Sargent House, details many of the accomplishments of Judith Sargent Murray’s life and showcases her intelligence, tenacity and enduring love for John Murray.

Judith Sargent Murray (1751-1820) was an 18th century essayist who believed in equal education, a woman’s right to work outside the home and equal roles between men and women in marriage. These were quite extraordinary beliefs to be espoused during that time period. As such she was an early advocate for women’s rights. Her second husband was John Murray (1741-1815), an Englishman who established the Universalist denomination in the United States.

The Sargent House where Judith spent her married life, is located in Gloucester, Massachusetts and is open as a house museum. The museum is open each year from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

Each May the Sargent House holds a free event called “Judith Speaks” where volunteers read the words of Judith Sargent that still resonate today. The event is a great introduction to the life and works of Judith Sargent Murray. Here is a video of the Judith Speaks event from 2012 (from the Cox Simoes YouTube page).

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

You can read the full story of the Grandfather Clock — which includes photos of the clock, his grandpa — and the actual thumbtacked note that inspired the Registry — on the Heirloom Registry’s blog.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Show Notes – Lost Babes with Melinde Lutz Byrne

Melinde Lutz ByrneFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 2 May 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Melinde Lutz Byrne about her book Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records, Essex County, Massachusetts, 1692-1745.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records, Essex County, Massachusetts, 1692-1745, published by the author (1992), is out of print. You can find it for sale from used booksellers but perhaps the best place to find it is at a local or regional library. Here is a link to the book on the Worldcat website. If you enter your zip code it will show you the library closest to you.

The first part of the show discussed the ins and outs of fornication cases and how the courts handled them from a legal point of view. We discussed what happened to the mothers, the fathers and the role of the midwife during labor.

In the second half of the show we discussed the Jane Doe forensic case involving an unidentified woman who was murdered in New Hampshire many years ago. Melinde described her involved in the case and the course she took on facial reconstruction.

Houstory, the makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry, donated two batches of Heirloom Registry registration numbers which were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Arizona and Ohio. A big thank you to Houstory for their generous donation!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Revolutionary New England with JL Bell is now available as a Podcast

PodcasticonbyDerickkwaThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring J.L. Bell discussing the Revolution in New England is now available as a podcast. This is a make-up broadcast which was originally scheduled for April 18, 2013. The sound quality, unfortunately, has a little bit of an echo but the fascinating topics are well worth the effort.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Show Notes – Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, MA

The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Mass by Scott C. Steward and Christopher C. Child on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 25 April 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Scott C. Steward and Christopher C. Child about the book The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts, published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society online bookstore.

Scott C. Steward and Christopher C. Child, the authors of the book, both work for the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Scott is the Director of Publications and Chris is  Genealogist of the Newbury Street Press.

Judge John Lowell was not the immigrant ancestor for the Lowell family which hailed from England but he was the progenitor of a long line of successful Lowell descendants. You can learn more about Judge John Lowell on Wikipedia.

During the program we discussed writing up a family genealogy. Chris and Scott mentioned the helpful book Genealogical Writing in the 21st Century, 2nd edition (Boston: NEHGS, 2006). There is also, a register style template created by Helen Schatvet Ullmann which is available free for download (you do not need to be a member to access this).

The New England Historic Genealogical Society, the publisher of The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts, donated two copies of the book which were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Utah and Georgia. A big thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

You can read the full story of the cookbook (as mentioned during the show) — and see pictures of Gommy in her Lopez garden and even a link to one of her recipes — on the Heirloom Registry’s blog.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Mass

LIVE: THURSDAY, 25 April 2013 at 1:00pm EDTThe Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Mass by Scott C. Steward and Christopher C. Child on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Christopher C. Child and Scott C. Steward who wrote The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts.

This book won three major awards:

  • The 2012 Donald Lines Jacobus Award from the American Society of Genealogists
  • The 2012 National Genealogical Society Award for Excellence: Genealogy and Family History Book.
  • The grand prize in the 2012 Connecticut Society of Genealogists Literary Award Contest.

This book demonstrates provides a perfect example of excellent and thorough published research. We will take the opportunity to learn from the author about the research skills and effort that goes into a work like this.

The first full treatment of the Lowell family since Delmar R. Lowell’s 1899 genealogy, The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts traces John6 Lowell’s descendants to the present day, or for as many as another nine generations. Among the famous descendants (and their spouses) covered in the book are Francis Cabot7 Lowell, for whom the city of Lowell is named; John8 Lowell, Jr., founder of the Lowell Institute; James Russell8 Lowell, the poet and diplomat; Isabella Stewart Gardner, art patron and museum founder; Civil War general Charles Russell9 Lowell, Jr., and his wife, Josephine Shaw Lowell; the astronomer Percival10 Lowell; Harvard president Abbott Lawrence10 Lowell; the poets Amy10 Lowell and Robert Traill Spence11 Lowell; Guy10 Lowell, the architect; and the statesmen brothers William Putnam12 and McGeorge12 Bundy.

Scott C. Steward has been Director of Publications at the New England Historic Genealogical Society since 2005. He is the author or editor of several books, including The Sarsaparilla Kings: A Biography of Dr. James Cook Ayer and Frederick Ayer, with a record The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Mass by Scott C. Steward and Christopher C. Child on Fieldstone Commonof their family; The Le Roy Family in America 1753-2003; and most recently The Descendants of Dr. Nathaniel Saltonstall of Haverhill, Massachusetts—the first full account of the Saltonstall family in more than a century.

Christopher C. Child is the author of numerous scholarly articles, he is the co-editor of The Ancestry of Catherine Middleton. Originally from Putnam, Connecticut, Chris Child has worked for various departments at NEHGS since 1997, became a full-time employee in July 2003, and has been a member of NEHGS since the age of eleven. Currently Genealogist of the Newbury Street Press, he is the co-editor of The Ancestry of Catherine Middleton and author of several articles in American Ancestors, The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, and The Mayflower Descendant.