FC 98 Lost Boston with Anthony Sammarco

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Anthony Sammarco, the author of the book Lost Boston.

Bio – Anthony Sammarco

Since 1997, Anthony Sammarco has taught history at the Urban College of Boston, and his course “Boston’s Immigrants” is based on his book of the same name to highlight the Lost Boston with Anthony Sammarco on Fieldstone Commoncity’s diversity. He was named educator of the year in 2003 and he serves on the UCB’s Leadership Council. Mr. Sammarco received the Bulfinch Award from the Doric Dames of the Massachusetts State House and the Washington Medal from the Freedom Foundation and was named Dorchester town historian by Raymond L. Flynn, mayor of Boston. He was elected a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is a member of the Boston Author’s Club and is a proprietor of the Boston Athenaeum. In his volunteer work, he is treasurer of the Victorian Society, New England Chapter, and a trustee of the Forest Hills Cemetery Educational Trust. He is past president of the Bay State Historical League and the Dorchester Historical Society. He lives in Boston and in Osterville on Cape Cod.

Book Summary

A nostalgic journey back in time to visit some of the disappeared buildings and places in all their grandeur, before the wrecking ball and decline set in.

From the 1850s up to the present day, 68 different losses are represented here, including schools, churches, theaters, grand mansions, dockyards, racetracks, parks, stores, hotels, offices, and factories. Organized chronologically starting with the earliest losses and ending with the latest, the book features much-loved insitutions that failed to stand the test of time, along with old-fashioned hotels and sports facilities that were beyond updating or refurbishment. Losses include Franklin Place, Boston City Hall, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Hancock House, Gleason’s Publishing Hall, Fort Hill, Franklin Street, Boston Coliseum, Boylston Market, Merchants Exchange, Haymarket Square, Boston Public Library, Horticultural Hall, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Revere House (Hotel), Huntington Avenue Grounds, Charlestown City Hall, Molasses Tank, Cyclorama, Readville Trotting Park and Race Track, East Boston Airport, Boston Latin School, East Boston Ferries, Braves Field, Massachusetts State Prison, Boston Opera House, Boston Aquarium, The Howard Athenaeum, and Dudley Street Station.

Publication InfoLost Boston with Anthony Sammarco on Fieldsotne Common

Title: Lost Boston

Publisher: Pavilion Books (2014)

Oversized Hardcover – 144 pages with lots of photos and an index.

Lost Boston is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Anthony Sammarco and I discuss the great variety of building and public places that have been removed from the Boston, Massachusetts landscape. They range from the Old Feather Shop to prisons, ferries and baseball fields. There was even a Victory Garden in what is now a park-like Copley Square. We discuss why the demolitions occurred and the way some buildings still remain but have been transformed. We also talk about the Boston Athenaeum as a historical repository and the importance of local history in the lives of neighborhood residents.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of Lost Boston is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Pavilion Books.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Pavilion Books for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/lost-boston-anthony-sammarco

News & Announcements

Fieldstone Common is now broadcast every other week.

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

 

FC 94 The Massachusetts History Conference

This week we are doing something a little different here on Fieldstone Common. We are going on-site to the 2014 Massachusetts History Conference which was themed “Never Done! Interpreting the History of Women at Work in Massachusetts.”

We’ll hear from a number of the speakers at the conference including keynote speaker Laurel Thatcher Ulrich.

The Massachusetts History Conference was held June 2, 2014 on the Campus of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Both presenters and attendees at the conference are featured in this episode, including two previous Fieldstone Common Guests Marla Miller and Michelle Marchetti Coughlin.

Featured guests in this broadcast include:

  • Pleun Bouricius, Mass Humanities
  • Kathryn Allamong Jacob, Curator of Manuscripts, Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
  • Jenny O’Neill, Director, Westport, Massachusetts Historical Society
  • Michelle Marchetti Coughlin, Author
  • Joanne Riley, University Archivist, UMass Boston
  • David Glassberg, Professor, Public History Dept., UMass Amherst
  • Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Professor, Harvard University

Links mentioned during the interview:

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/mass-history-conference

FC 89 In Search of Sacco & Vanzetti with Susan Tejada

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Susan Tejada, the author of the book In Search of Sacco and Vanzetti: Double Lives, Troubled Times and the Massachusetts Murder Case that Shook the World.

Bio – Susan Tejada

Susan Tejada is a former writer and editor at the National Geographic Society, where she In Search of Sacco & Vanzetti with Susan Tejada on Fieldstone Commonwas editor-in-chief of National Geographic World magazine and authored and edited geography books for young readers. She was previously the associate editor of EPA Journal, reporting on environmental issues. A native of Providence, Rhode Island, she has taught non-fiction writing for young readers at the Highlights Foundation summer Writers’ Workshops in Chautauqua, New York.

Tejada received a research fellowship from The Lilly Library of Indiana University for In Search of Sacco and Vanzetti. The book is the recipient of the 2013 Independent Publisher Book Award gold medal for true crime.

 Book Summary

It was a bold and brutal crime–robbery and murder in broad daylight on the streets of South Braintree, Massachusetts, in 1920. Tried for the crime and convicted, two Italian-born laborers, anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, went to the electric chair in 1927, professing their innocence. Journalist Susan Tejada has spent years investigating the case, sifting through diaries and police reports and interviewing descendants of major figures. She discovers little-known facts about Sacco, Vanzetti, and their supporters, and develops a tantalizing theory about how a doomed insider may have been coerced into helping professional criminals plan the heist.

Tejada’s close-up view of the case allows readers to see those involved as individual personalities. She also paints a fascinating portrait of a bygone era: Providence gangsters and Boston Brahmins; nighttime raids and midnight bombings; and immigration, unionism, draft dodging, and violent anarchism in the turbulent early years of the twentieth century. In many ways this is as much a cultural history as a true-crime mystery or courtroom drama. Because the case played out against a background of domestic terrorism, in a time that echoes our own, we have a new appreciation of the potential connection between fear and the erosion of civil liberties and miscarriages of justice.

Publication InfoIn Search of Sacco & Vanzetti with Susan Tejada on Fieldstone Common

Title: In Search of Sacco and Vanzetti: Double Lives, Troubled Times and the Massachusetts Murder Case that Shook the World

Publisher: University Press of New England (2012)

Hard Cover; 386 pages with end notes, selected bibliography, index and some photos.

In Search of Sacco and Vanzetti: Double Lives, Troubled Times and the Massachusetts Murder Case that Shook the World is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Susan and I discuss the complex case of Sacco & Vanzetti amidst the tumultuous times of the early 20th century complete with the end of WWI, the Red Scare, Anarchism, the rise of the labor movement and an anti-immigrant backlash. Were Sacco & Vanzetti guilty of robbery and murder or were they the unwilling victims of their times? We dig into some surprising evidence!

Prize Winner

One copy of In Search of Sacco and Vanzetti: Double Lives, Troubled Times and the Massachusetts Murder Case that Shook the World is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the University Press of New England.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to the University Press of New England for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/sacco-vanzetti-susan-tejada

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 89)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 89 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 87 A History of Howard Johnson’s with Anthony Sammarco

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Anthony Sammarco, the author of the book A History of Howard Johnson’s: How a Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became an American Icon.

Bio – Anthony Sammarco

Since 1997, Anthony Sammarco has taught history at the Urban College of Boston, and his course “Boston’s Immigrants” is based on his book of the same name to highlight the city’s diversity. He was named educator of the year in 2003 and he serves on the UCB’s A History of Howard Johnson's with Anthony Sammarco on Fieldstone CommonLeadership Council. Mr. Sammarco received the Bulfinch Award from the Doric Dames of the Massachusetts State House and the Washington Medal from the Freedom Foundation and was named Dorchester town historian by Raymond L. Flynn, mayor of Boston. He was elected a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is a member of the Boston Author’s Club and is a proprietor of the Boston Athenaeum. In his volunteer work, he is treasurer of the Victorian Society, New England Chapter, and a trustee of the Forest Hills Cemetery Educational Trust. He is past president of the Bay State Historical League and the Dorchester Historical Society. He lives in Boston and in Osterville on Cape Cod.

Book Summary

Howard Johnson created an orange-roofed empire of ice cream stands and restaurants that stretched from Maine to Florida and all the way to the West Coast. Popularly known as the “Father of the Franchise Industry,” Johnson delivered good food and prices that brought appreciative customers back for more. The attractive white Colonial Revival restaurants, with eye-catching porcelain tile roofs, illuminated cupolas and sea blue shutters, were described in Reader’s Digest in 1949 as the epitome of “eating places that look like New England town meeting houses dressed up for Sunday.” Boston historian and author Anthony M. Sammarco recounts how Howard Johnson introduced twenty-eight flavors of ice cream, the “Tendersweet” clam strips, grilled frankforts and a menu of delicious and traditional foods that families eagerly enjoyed when they traveled.

Publication Info

Title: A History of Howard Johnson’s: How a Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became an American Icon

Publisher: The History Press (2013)

Paperback; 157 pages  with a bibliography, index and lots of photos.

A History of Howard Johnson’s: How a Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became an American Icon is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Anthony and I discuss Howard Johnson, the man, who built an incredible business empire of restaurants and hotels that originated in the Boston area. We also talk about some very surprising cameo appearances by Jacques Pepin, Pierre Franey and the House of Dior. We start with the rise of Howard Johson’s as an ice cream stand to its demise in 1979 when it was sold out of the family. You will be surprised by the history you hear in this story!

Prize Winner

One copy of A History of Howard Johnson’s is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/history-howard-johnsons-anthony-sammarco

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 87)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 87 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 83 – Rebecca Dickinson with Marla R. Miller

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Marla R. Miller, author of the book Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman.

Bio – Marla R. Miller

Marla R. Miller, a historian of early American women and work, has made a career uncovering the lives of women who left little in the way of documentary record. She is a professor of Marla Miller on Fieldstone Commonhistory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and directs the Public History program there. She has won the Organization of American Historians’ Lerner-Scott Prize for the best dissertation on women’s history and the 1997 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Colonial History.

This is Marla’s second visit to Fieldstone Common. She appeared on the July 4th, 2013 episode to talk about her other book, Betsy Ross and the Making of America.

Book Summary

Rebecca Dickinson’s powerful voice, captured through excerpts from the pages of her journal, allows colonial and revolutionary-era New England to come alive. Dickinson’s life illustrates the dilemmas faced by many Americans in the decades before, during, and after the American Revolution, as well as the paradoxes presented by an unmarried woman who earned her own living and made her own way in the small town where she was born. Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman, uses Dickinson’s world as a lens to introduce readers to the everyday experience of living in the colonial era and the social, cultural, and economic challenges faced in the transformative decades surrounding the American Revolution.

Publication InfoRebecca Dickinson with Marla Miller on Fieldstone Common

Title: Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman

Publisher: Westview Press (2014)

Trade Paperback; 194 pages with a list or primary sources, end notes, bibliographic essay and an index.

Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

Marla and I talk about the diary that acted as the background for Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Woman. Rebecca lived through American Revolution to see the birth of the United States. She remained unmarried and supported herself independently as a gown maker. Though she had several proposals of marriage she rejected them. Her life was a careful balance of conscious independence and loneliness.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of Rebecca Dickinson: Independence for a New England Womanwas given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Westview Press.

The winner is:

  • Debra Cravens of Wisconsin

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Westview Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/rebecca-dickinson-marla-miller

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 83)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 83 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 75 Strong Boy with Christopher Klein

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Christopher Klein, author of the book Strong Boy: The Life and Times of John L. Sullivan, America’s First Sports Hero.

Bio – Christopher Klein

Christopher Klein is a history and travel writer and the author of two previous books, Discovering the Boston Harbor Islands: A Guide to the City’s Hidden Shores–which covers the rich history, recreational offerings, and heritage of each of the 34 islands that compose Strong Boy with Christopher Klein on Fieldstone Commonthe Boston Harbor Islands national park area–and The Die-Hard Sports Fan’s Guide to Boston.

A frequent contributor to The Boston Globe and History.com, he has also written for The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler, Harvard Magazine, Red Sox Magazine, ESPN.com, Smithsonian.com, and AmericanHeritage.com.

Christopher graduated summa cum laude and with honors from Drew University in Madison, New Jersey. He is a member of the Boston Authors Club and the American Society of Journalists and Authors.

You can learn more about Christopher Klein at his author website, www.ChristopherKlein.com and at his book website, www.strongboybook.com.
You can also follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

Book Summary

“I can lick any son-of-a-b— in the world.”

So boasted John L. Sullivan, the first modern heavyweight boxing champion of the world, a John L. Sullivan (Library of Congress photo)man who was the gold standard of American sport for more than a decade, and the first athlete to earn more than a million dollars. He had a big ego, big mouth, and bigger appetites. His womanizing, drunken escapades, and chronic police-blotter presence were godsends to a burgeoning newspaper industry. The larger-than-life boxer embodied the American Dream for late nineteenth-century immigrants as he rose from Boston’s Irish working class to become the most recognizable man in the nation. In the process, the “Boston Strong Boy” transformed boxing from outlawed bare-knuckle fighting into the gloved spectacle we know today.

Strong Boy tells the story of America’s first sports superstar, a self-made man who personified the power and excesses of the Gilded Age. Everywhere John L. Sullivan went, his fists backed up his bravado. Sullivan’s epic brawls, such as his 75-round bout against Jake Kilrain, and his cross-country barnstorming tour in which he literally challenged all of America to a fight are recounted in vivid detail, as are his battles outside the ring with a troubled marriage, wild weight and fitness fluctuations, and raging alcoholism. Strong Boy gives readers ringside seats to the colorful tale of one of the country’s first Irish-American heroes and the birth of the American sports media and the country’s celebrity obsession with athletes.

Book InfoStrong Boy with Christopher Klein on Fieldstone Common

Title: Strong Boy: The Life and Times of John L. Sullivan, America’s First Sports Hero

Publisher: Lyons Press (2013)

Hardcover; 353 pages with end notes, bibliography, an index and BxW photos.

Strong Boy: The Life and Times of John L. Sullivan, America’s First Sports Hero is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Chris and I talk about John L. Sullivan the son of a humble Irish immigrant family who went on to achieve sports super stardom in the realm of boxing. The Irish had a difficult time, first with the famine in Ireland and then later with prejudice in America. John L. Sullivan had a fighting aptitude for boxing at a time when the rules of boxing were changing.  Gone were the rules that allowed for barefisted fighting, hair pulling and wrestling. These were replaced with more civilized rules including the use of gloves and three-minute rounds.  With fame also came alcoholism and other vices for John L. Sullivan. Surprisingly after his retirement from boxing Sullivan continued to be a sought after star in the theatre and other areas.  In 1905 he gave up drinking and embraced the temperance movement.  Author Christoper Klein regards John L. Sullivan as America’s First Sports Hero.

Prize Winners

One copy of Strong Boy: The Life and Times of John L. Sullivan, America’s First Sports Hero was given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Lyons Press.

The winner is: :

  • Bruce Longley of New York
  • Margaret Sullivan of Massachusetts

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Lyons Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/strong-boy-christopher-klein

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 75)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 75 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 74 The Dawn of American Independence with Brian Deming

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Brian Deming, author of the book Boston and the Dawn of American Independence.

Bio – Brian Deming

Brian Deming, author of Boston and the Dawn of American Independence on Fieldstone CommonBrian Deming grew up in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan and has a master’s degree in American history from Northwestern University. He was a newspaper reporter in Brighton and Jackson, Michigan, and in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. He also worked as a magazine editor and freelance journalist in Munich, Prague, Tokyo, Manila, San Francisco, and Chicago, as well as Watertown, Massachusetts, and taught American history at the University of New York in Prague. His other books are Jackson, An Illustrated History; Hitler and Munich (with Ted Iliff); and Wind Time, Wolf Time (a novel about the Thirty Years War). He and his wife live in Toronto, where he works as a freelance editor.

You can learn more about Brian Deming at his website, Boston Dawn.

Book Summary

In 1760, no one could imagine the American colonies revolting against Great Britain. The colonists were not hungry peasants groaning under the whip of a brute. They lived well. Land was cheap, wages were good, opportunities abounded. While many colonists hadBrian Deming, author of Boston and the Dawn of American Independence on Fieldstone Common been in the New World for generations, they identified with Britain, and England was still “home.” Yet in the space of just fifteen years these sturdy bonds snapped. Boston—a town of just 16,000—lit the fire for American Independence. Brian Deming explains how and why in his lucid, lively, and deeply researched Boston and the Dawn of American Independence.

To dodge British taxes, Boston merchants for as long as anyone could remember had routinely smuggled in molasses from French and Spanish possessions in the Caribbean. Boston distillers transformed this sweet cargo into rum, the liquid gold traded around the world. But British authorities cracked down on smuggling and imposed the Sugar Act to help pay for the debts incurred during their wars against France. Then came the hated Stamp Act, a tax on documents, newspapers, and printed materials of all kinds. In courtrooms, in the press, and in the streets, Bostonians rallied in protest against taxation without representation. As anger swept America, Boston was at the center of the storm, which burst forth with the infamous massacre and the Boston Tea Party. By 1775, open warfare erupted at Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill. Boston and the Dawn of American Independence ties these scenes together with the people of the time, including John and Sam Adams, John Hancock, and Paul Revere, as well as Thomas Hutchinson, the beleaguered Massachusetts royal governor, and James Otis, the bombastic, unstable early patriot. Readers hear their voices, but also those of many amazing, colorful, and memorable personalities— feisty mob leaders, defiant Tories, terrified townspeople. Deming illuminates this epic story with views of everyday life inside taverns, outside newspaper offices, and along the wharves, and the political dramas in London and Philadelphia that shaped the destiny of an empire and gave rise to the world’s first modern democracy.

Book InfoBrian Deming author of Boston and the Dawn of American Independence on Fieldstone Common

Title: Boston and the Dawn of American Independence

Publisher: Westholme Publishing (2013)

Hardcover; 508 pages with end notes, bibliography, an index and BxW photos and illustrations.

Boston and the Dawn of American Independence is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Brian and I talk about the characters involved in politics at the start of the American Revolution such as Thomas Hutchinson, James Otis Jr., Sam Adams, John Hancock and many more. We also talked about the women of the Revolutionary era in Boston such as Jane Mecom, Mercy Otis Warren and Abigail Adams. Since the book was quite a detailed undertaking we talked about Brian’s process for writing and footnoting all the information. At the very end we get into a brief discussion about journalism and all the places his career has taken him over the years.

Prize Winners

One copy of Boston and the Dawn of American Independence was given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Westholme Publishing.

The winner is: :

  • Rich Sandler of Oregon

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Westholme Publishing for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/american-independence-brian-deming/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 74)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 74 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 71 Cambridge Cameos with Roger Thompson

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Roger Thompson, author of the book Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in 17th Century New England.

Roger is our first Fieldstone Common guest to make a second appearance on the show. He first appeared discussing his book From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692. Roger lives in England so when he was visiting the United States this past summer I took advantage of fitting in a second interview with him.

This interview is a little different. It is not done in a studio but recorded live at his summer Cambridge Cameos with Roger Thomoson on Fieldstone Commonresidence in the very busy, bustling and noisy city of Cambridge, Massachusetts. So we will have some ambiance noise from this city in the background of the interview. I hope you won’t find that too distracting. It seems fitting somehow that we spoke in the heart of Cambridge since our discussion centered on the early history of that city.

Bio

Roger Thompson is emeritus professor of American Colonial History at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England.

In addition to From Deference to Defiance, Roger Thompson has written:

Book Summary

Cambridge Cameos contains forty-four sketches from the period 1651 to 1686 that combine good stories, intriguing personalities, and incidents involving mostly ordinary Cambridge people. They are based on thousands of original documents; virtually all primary sources with any bearing on the early history of Cambridge. Drawing on his vast knowledge of Middlesex County families and on his equally vast experience in the town and court records of that county, Roger Thompson has composed a number of delightful vignettes of early residents of the town of Cambridge. He provides us with a rare opportunity to hear these early New Englanders speak for themselves and to experience seventeenth-century life as directly as possible.

Book Info Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in Seventeenth-Century New England

Title: Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in 17th Century New England

Publisher: New England Historic Genealogical Society (2005)

Trade paperback; 355 pages with 2 appendices, footnotes notes, and an index.

Cambridge Cameos is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Roger and I dive into all the fascinating aspects of life in the 1600s in Cambridge from the unusual ways people paid for their Harvard tuition to the culture of discipline and why female healers were often accused of witchcraft.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Cambridge Cameos were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

The winners are:

  • Jean Smoorenburg of Texas
  • Cynthia Bishop of Virginia

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/cambridge-cameos-roger-thompson/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 70)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 70 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 64 Artful and Designing Men – A look at Shays’ Rebellion with Gary Shattuck

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Gary Shattuck, author of the book Artful and Designing Men: The Trials of Job Shattuck and the Regulation of 1786-1787. This book explores the topic of Shays’ Rebellion, an uprising of farmers in Massachusetts, that protested unfair tax collection in the economically unstable times following the Revolutionary War.

Bio

Gary Shattuck is a native of Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up on the west coast and Artful and Designing Men with Gary Shattuck on Fieldstone Commongraduated from the University of Colorado with a degree in Anthropology. That’s where he met his wife of forty-one years and they now reside in Vermont. He is a magna cum laude graduate of the Vermont Law School, and is currently pursuing a Masters degree in Military History, concentrating on the Revolutionary War.

He served thirty-five years in the law enforcement community as a supervisor with the Vermont State Police, an Assistant Attorney General for the State of Vermont prosecuting cases for the Drug Task Force, and then with the United States Department of Justice as an Assistant United States Attorney in the District of Vermont working on guns, drugs, and organized crime matters. Following the events of 9/11, he was named anti-terrorism coordinator for the district. He has also served in Kosovo and Iraq working to re-establish their court systems following those particular conflicts. He retired from the department in 2006.

Gary has just completed his second book concerning the devastating effects of Jefferson’s Embargo of 1807 on those living in northern Vermont and which resulted in the murders of three individuals, including two government officials, in the summer of 1808. It will be released in 2014.

You can find more information at the Artful and Designing Men website page and you can follow Gary on his Facebook page.

Book Summary

It is not often that descriptions of historical events can be rewritten absent compelling evidence that those past accounts were somehow in error. But that is precisely the result when new-found court documents, presumed to not even exist, shed surprising new light on the involvement of Capt. Job Shattuck, one of the principal leaders in the event history has come to call Shays’ Rebellion. In Artful and Designing Men: The Trials of Job Shattuck and the Regulation of 1786-1787, Gary Shattuck (half-nephew, seven generations removed) delves deeply into the significant contributions made by this charismatic and well-respected veteran of the Seven Years’ War, the Revolutionary War, and community member as he transitioned from peaceful town father to protest leader. Tried and sentenced to death for high treason, shocking new information provided during his trial now forces a reassessment of this honorable man’s actions, resulting in the deserved rehabilitation of a reputation that history has denied until now.

Book Info Artful and Designing Men with Gary Shattuck on Fieldstone Common

Title: Artful and Designing Men: The Trials of Job Shattuck and the Regulation of 1786-1787

Publisher: Tate Publishing (2013)

Trade paperback; 411 pages with bibliography, index, end notes and a center color insert section.

Artful and Designing Men is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we discuss how this book came to be – when no records were supposed to exist – and yet Gary Shattuck found them. Those records, court documents, were resting quietly for years at the Massachusetts Historical Society waiting to be found. The documents redefined Shays’ rebellion and Job Shattuck participation in the event.

The story also follows the parallel lives of the Shattuck and Prescott families starting in the 1600s and becoming quite dramatic as the families take opposite sides in Shays’ Rebellion.

This interview will not only explain what Shays’ Rebellion is but will clarify its importance in the development of the constitution and the way the elite interacted with the populace as the United States slowly became an independent country.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Artful and Designing Men were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Tate Publishing.

The winners are:

  • Peter Godenschwager of Ohio
  • Sue Schlichting of Kansas

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the Tate Publishing for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher.  Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 64)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 63 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

The 1919 Boston Police Strike with James Redfearn

LIVE: THURSDAY, 22 August 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews author James Redfearn James Redfearnabout the 1919 Boston Police Strike.

Leading up to 1919 the Boston Police were working long hours for very little pay. In the post WWI era America was rocked by instability, the growth of the labor and suffrage movement and the Red Scare. The mostly Irish police force was at odds with the Brahmin state leaders. The showdown led to chaos on the streets of Boston and helped pave the way for Calvin Coolidge, then governor of Massachusetts, to the White House.

We’ll talk about how James Redfearn researched the historical event for use in his novel, The Rising and Roxbury Crossing.

James Redfearn, author of the Irish American historical saga, The Rising at Roxbury Crossing, has been an industrial-commercial photographer, a Massachusetts State The Rising at Roxbury Crossing by James RedfearnTrooper and an investigator for a Boston law firm. He graduated from Harvard University with an ALM in Literature and Creative Writing. His stories have been published in the University’s Charles River Review and the New England Writers Network. He was raised in the Mission Hill neighborhood of Boston and now resides with his wife, Gail, west of the city where he enjoys his four children and eight grandchildren.

In 1971, he began a twenty-one year career with the State Police, serving as a patrol officer, criminal investigator and academy instructor. He has lectured on investigative research methods at national Law Enforcement conferences.

Jim has also been an Assistant to the President of a Massachusetts health care system, an investigator for the Boston law firm, Choate, Hall & Stewart and an industrial-commercial photographer for Edgerton, Germeshausen & Grier, a company specializing in nuclear testing, marine studies and high-speed photography.