Show Notes – The Great Escape with Chris Pagliuco

ShowPhoto-Pagliuco-2Following are some items that were mentioned during the 6 June 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Christopher Pagliuco about his book The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe: Smuggled Through Connecticut.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

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The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe: Smuggled Through Connecticut, published by The History Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

2013-06-1You can learn more about Chris at his website. You can also follow him on Twitter.

Edward Whalley and William Goffe were labeled as regicides for their part in signing the death warrant of English King Charles I. With the return of Charles II the power, Whalley and Goffe fled to the New England colonies. They remained their in hiding for the rest of their lives without being discovered. Puritans leaders such as Rev. Increase Mather, Gov. John Endecott, and Gov. William Leete risked their lives to conceal and aid the pair. The legend of the Angel of Hadley arose out of William Goffe’s supposed bravery during King Philip’s War.

The History Press, the publisher of The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Tennessee and Arizona. A big thank you to the The History Press for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

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The Great Escape with Christopher Pagliuco

ShowPhoto-Pagliuco-2LIVE: THURSDAY, 6 June 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Christopher Pagliuco, author of The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe: Smuggled Through Connecticut.

When Puritans Edward Whalley and William Goffe joined the parliamentary army against King Charles I in the English civil wars, they seized an opportunity to overthrow a tyrant. Under their battlefield leadership, the army trounced the Royalist forces and then cut off the king’s head. Yet when his son, Charles II, regained the throne, Whalley and Goffe were force to flee to the New England colonies aboard the ship Prudent Mary–never to see their families or England again. Even with the help of New England’s Puritan elite, including Reverend John Davenport, they struggled to stay a step ahead of searches for their arrest in Boston, New Haven (where they hid out in The Great Escape of Edward Whalley & William Goffe with Chris Pagliuco on Fieldstone CommonJudges Cave) and the outpost of Hadley, Massachusetts. Forced to live as fugitives, these former major generals survived frontier adventures in seventeenth-century New England. Author Christopher Pagliuco reveals the all-but-forgotten stories of these Connecticut heroes.

Chris Pagliuco is a freelance writer who specializes in seventeenth-century colonial history. His interest in the regicides originated in his graduate studies in history at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. He teaches high school history in Madison, Connecticut and serves as town historian in Essex, Connecticut and on the editorial team of Connecticut Explored, a quarterly history publication. He lives with his wife, two daughters, and two dogs in Ivoryton, Connecticut.

 

Show Notes – The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 28 March 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Ava Chamberlain, author of The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle: Marriage Murder, and Madness in the Family of Jonathan Edwards.”

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

 

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle, published by the New York University Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle reconstructs the life of Elizabeth Tuttle (1645 – after 1691), the paternal grandmother of renowned American preacher, Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758). Despite having son and grandson who were ministers, Elizabeth and the Tuttle family were marred by divorce and murder in the family. In this book, Ava Chamberlain gives voice to Elizabeth Tuttle, much of whose history to date has been presented by the point of view of her husband, Richard Edwards.

The New York University Press, the publisher of The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle, donated a copy of the book which was given as “door prize” during the live show to listener in Iowa. A big thank you to the New York University Press for their generosity!

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle is now Archived as a Podcast

PodcasticonbyDerickkwaThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Ava Chamberlain author of the book The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle: Marriage, Murder, and Madness in the Family of Jonathan Edwards is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 28 March 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Prof. Ava Chamberlain, author of The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle: Marriage, Murder, and Madness in the Family of Jonathan Edwards.

Who was Elizabeth Tuttle?

In most histories, she is a footnote, a blip. At best, she is a minor villain in the story of Jonathan Edwards, perhaps the greatest American theologian of the colonial era. Many historians consider Jonathan Edwards a theological genius, wildly ahead of his time, a Puritan hero. Elizabeth Tuttle was Edwards’s “crazy grandmother,” the one whose madness and adultery drove his despairing grandfather to divorce.

In this compelling and meticulously researched work of micro-history, Ava Chamberlain unearths a fuller history of Elizabeth Tuttle. It is a violent and tragic story in which anxious patriarchs struggle to govern their households, unruly women disobey their husbands, mental illness tears families apart, and loved ones die sudden deaths. Through the lens of Elizabeth Tuttle, Chamberlain re-examines the common narrative of Jonathan Edwards’s ancestry, giving his long-ignored paternal grandmother a voice.

The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle not only brings to light the tragic story of an ordinary The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle with Ava Chamberlain on Fieldstone Commonwoman living in early New England, it also explores the deeper tension between the ideal of Puritan family life and its messy reality, complicating the way America has thought about its Puritan past.

Ava Chamberlain is Associate Professor of Religion at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. She is the editor of The “Miscellanies,” Nos. 501-832, vol. 18 of The Works of Jonathan Edwards.

 

Show Notes – Connecticut’s Fife & Drum Tradition with James Clark

*** Houstory Scavenger Hunt Info ***
 
Following are some items that were mentioned during the 21 February 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with James Clark, author of Connecticut’s Fife & Drum Tradition.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

James Clark belongs to a fife and drum band called Connecticut Valley Field Music. You can learn more about the band at their website. Visit their Facebook page to see lots of photos of the band in action and to hear a sample of their music.

The book Connecticut’s Fife & Drum Tradition, published by Wesleyan University Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

Here are some audio files where you can listen to sample music from the Connecticut Valley Field Music band:

Here are some videos that you can watch of the band in action:

(6 minutes)

Here is a list of fife and drum corps in the United States, predominantly from the east coast. Another page on the same site provides a schedule (with links) to a number of 2013 fife and drum musters.

Wesleyan University Press, the publisher of Connecticut’s Fife & Drum Tradition, donated a copy of the book which was given as “door prize” during the live show to a listener in Texas.  A big thank you to Wesleyan University Press for  their generosity!

*** Houstory Scavenger Hunt Info *** 

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site. 

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

 

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Connecticut’s Fife & Drum Tradition with James Clark

Connecticut's Fife & Drum Tradition with James Clark on Fieldstone Common

LIVE: THURSDAY, 21 February 2013 at 1:00pm EST

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews James Clark, author of Connecticut’s Fife & Drum Tradition.

The state of Connecticut boasts an extensive and active community of fife and drum groups. This musical tradition has its origins in the small military bands maintained by standing armies in Britain and Europe in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries—the drum was especially important as it helped officers train soldiers how to march, and was also used to communicate with troops across battlefields. Today fifers and drummers gather at conventions called “musters,” which may include a parade and concerts featuring the various participating corps. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the largest muster ever was held in Deep River, Connecticut, in 1976. Musician and historian James Clark is the first to detail the colorful history of this unique music. This engaging book leads the reader through the history of the individual instruments and tells the story of this classic folk tradition through anecdotes, biographies, photographs, and musical examples.
Connecticut's Fife & Drum Tradition with James Clark on Fieldstone Common
JAMES CLARK is a founding member of the Connecticut Valley Field Music, a fife and drum band based in Middletown, Connecticut. A true advocate of this music, Clark gives lectures and demonstrations to a wide array of audiences around the state, across the nation, and in Europe.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – Witchcraft Prosecution With Richard Tomlinson

Richard G. Tomlinson, author of Witchcraft Prosecution

Richard G. Tomlinson

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 18 October 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with Richard G. Tomlinson, author of Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can learn more about Richard G. Tomlinson and Witchcraft Prosecution from his author website.

Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut was published by Picton Press and copies are available for sale through the Connecticut Society of Genealogists.  At this point it’s not available on Amazon.com.

Information about the Samuel Wyllys Papers, 1668-1728 is available from the Connecticut State Library. The collection includes a helpful finding aid.

Brown University also has a collection of the Wyllys (Samuel) papers, 1638-1757.

The Connecticut State Library has information about Colony of Connecticut Governor, John Winthrop, Jr.

Press Press, the publisher of Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut, donated two copies that were given as a door prizes during the live show. A big thank you to the Picton Press for  their generosity!

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Witchcraft Prosecution with Richard G. Tomlinson

Richard G. Tomlinson

LIVE: THURSDAY, 18 OCTOBER 2012 at 1:00pm EST

Listen in to Fieldstone Common this week as host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to Richard G. Tomlinson, author of Witchcraft Prosecution: Chasing the Devil in Connecticut.

Mercy Disbrow was convicted. A date was set for her hanging. An appeal was made. Then something extraordinary happened. Mercy was granted a reprieve that became a pardon, because of a technical error in the composition of the jury. The court said, “If a real and apparent murderer be condemned and executed outside of due form of law, it is indictable against them that do it.” The place was Hartford, Connecticut. The offense was witchcraft. The year was 1693.

Connecticut’s colonial settlers feared witches. They came from an England where the prosecution of witches was rising to its peak, and they were anxious about the possible threats to their new settlements that witchcraft might represent. This book presents the evolution of witchcraft prosecution in Connecticut from the enactment of the law making it a capital offence in 1642 to its disappearance in the early 1700s.

Richard G. Tomlinson, is a founder and director of the Connecticut Society of Genealogists, Inc. (www.csginc.org) and currently serves as Chair of the Publication Committee and as vice president. He created the annual CSG Literary Awards for Genealogy and Family History, and the CSG magazine, Connecticut Genealogy News, and has published many genealogical and family history articles.

He is a contributing author to several scientific and technical books and the author of three histories including Witchcraft Trials of Connecticut and Tele-Revolution, A history of the creation of a competitive telecommunications industry 1984-2000. Picton Press released his latest book, Witchcraft Prosecution, Chasing the Devil in Connecticut, in August 2012. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Connecticut Historical Society. He is a descendant of Henry Tomlinson of Derby, England who settled in Milford, CT in 1650.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis