FC 99 Monuments Man Deane Keller with Laura Macaluso

Deane Keller with CosimoThis week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Laura Macaulso, curator of “An Artist at War: Deane Keller, New Haven’s Monuments Man,” an exhibit at the New Haven Museum in New Haven, Connecticut. This week’s discussion is a little different because we are not speaking about a particular book. Instead we are talking with Laura about Deane Keller and all she leaned about him researching for this exhibit.

Bio – Laura Macaluso

Laura A. Macaluso was trained in art history, museums and cultural heritage and spent Deane Keller Dog Tagsher 20s and 30s studying, working and traveling. Now, she is getting down to some writing, including a new book on portraits as a sideline to her dissertation on city identity and public art.

Laura remembers three important places in her travels: Florence, where she earned a Master’s degree in art history, Edinburgh, where she was married, and southern Africa, where she was a Fulbright Scholar. She plans to visit Egypt when she earns her PhD from Salve Regina University.

She is a recent transplant to central Virginia, where her husband Jeffrey Nichols directs Thomas Jefferson’s retreat home, Poplar Forest (www.poplarforest.org). They enjoy visiting historic sites and parks, but mostly sitting by the fire with two cats and a dog.

Publication Info Connecticut Explored Winter 2014

Title: Connecticut Explored Magazine

Publication Date: Winter 2014

Article: “New Haven’s Monuments Man,” by Laura A. Macaluso

The Interview

Deane Keller drawing - Leaning Tower of PisaThe Monuments Men were a real unit during WWII tasked with saving the great art of Europe from Hitler and the Nazis. The Monuments Men became better known after a book of the same title by Robert Edsel and then further by the recent movie starring George Clooney. There were three Monuments Men from Connecticut, one of them, Yale Professor Deane Keller is currently being featured (December 2014-May 2015) in an exhibit at the New Haven Museum in New Haven, Connecticut. In this interview Laura Macaluso and I discuss Deane Keller’s life, his talents and his success as a Monument’s Man and how he became beloved by the people of Italy for protecting their heritage.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

A one-year subscription to Connecticut Explored Magazine is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Connecticut Explored.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week [leave comment below to be entered to win]

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Connecticut Explored Magazine for their generosity in donating the subscription!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/monuments-man-deane-keller

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Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 99)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 99 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 97 An Extraordinary Family with Liz Petry

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is author Liz Petry. This week’s discussion is a little different because we are not speaking about a particular book. Instead we are talking with Liz about her inspirational and extraordinary family which include two of the first licensed African American Pharmacists in the state of Connecticut and her mother, Ann Petry who was the first best selling female African American author.

Bio – Liz Petry

With more than 10 years of experience in journalism and a degree in law, Liz Petry has Elisabeth Petryfound great rewards in researching and writing two books about aspects of the African American experience. Her first book “Can Anything Beat White?: A Black Family’s Letters,” explored the lives of her maternal grandmother’s family as they traveled to Hawaii, the Philippines and parts of the Deep South between the 1890s and 1910. Her second book, “At Home Inside: A Daughter’s Tribute to Ann Petry,” is a memoir about her amazing and multifaceted mother, the renowned author, Ann Petry. Liz is currently working on a new non-fiction book that engages topics beyond her family and beyond the twentieth century.

Publication Info

Title: Connecticut Explored Magazine

Publication Date: Fall 2014

Article: “Just Like Georgia Except for the Climate,” by Elisabeth Petry

The Interview

In this interview Liz Petry and I discuss her family’s transformation from Southern escaped slaves to educated middle class residents of Connecticut. Her grandfather, Peter Lane, was the first male African American pharmacist in the State of Connecticut and her great aunt, Anna Louise James, was the first female African American pharmacist. Her mother was the first African American Best Selling Author in the United States. We dig deep into her heritage and discuss the successes and challenges that her family has faced through the generations.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Books by Ann Petry

Please see the WikiPedia listing above for other books by Ann Petry.

Books By Liz Petry

Prize Winner

A one-year subscription to Connecticut Explored Magazine is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Connecticut Explored.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Connecticut Explored Magazine for their generosity in donating the subscription!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/liz-petry

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Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 97)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 97 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 95 The British Raid on Essex with Jerry Roberts

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Jerry Roberts, the author of the book The British Raid on Essex: The Forgotten Battle of the War of 1812. This book re-introduces a part of the War of 1812 that was erased from American history.

Bio – Jerry Roberts

Jerry Roberts has been in the history business for over 30 years. He has served as Vice President in charge of Exhibits at the Intrepid Sea Air Space Museum in New York City, Executive Director of Connecticut River Museum in Essex CT, and Battlefield Historian for The British Raid on Essex with Jerry Roberts on Fieldstone Commonthe British Raid on Essex Project. He has designed and built over forty exhibits, has written or co-written several books and documentaries and has published dozens of newspaper and magazine articles.

Roberts is an avid sailor and merchant marine master and has navigated the eastern seaboard in small boats and historic vessels from The Gulf Coast to Nova Scotia.

He now lives overlooking the Connecticut River with his wife and two children where he continues to write about adventures large and small while designing exhibits and public programs.

Book Summary

This is the dynamic account of one of the most destructive maritime actions to take place in Connecticut history: the 1814 British attack on the privateers of Pettipaug, known today as the British Raid on Essex. During the height of the War of 1812, 136 Royal marines and sailors made their way up the Connecticut River from warships anchored in Long Island Sound. Guided by a well-paid American traitor the British navigated the Saybrook shoals and advanced up the river under cover of darkness. By the time it was over, the British had burned twenty-seven American vessels, including six newly built privateers. It was the largest single maritime loss of the war. Yet this story has been virtually left out of the history books—the forgotten battle of the forgotten war. This new account from author and historian Jerry Roberts is the definitive overview of this event and includes a wealth of new information drawn from recent research and archaeological finds. Illustrations and detailed maps bring the battle to life.

Publication Info The British Raid on Essex with Jerry Roberts on Fieldstone Common

Title: The British Raid on Essex: The Forgotten Battle of the War of 1812

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press (2014)

Hard cover; 197 pages with appendices including transcriptions of original documents, a chronology, end notes and an index.

The British Raid on Essex is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Jerry Roberts captivates us with the riveting story of a long forgotten but dramatic raid on the town of Essex, Connecticut during the War of 1812. The casualties during the raid were minor but the devastation was great with the destruction of over 25 vessels being built in Essex. Learn about the traitor who helped the British navigate their way up the Connecticut River and how the British escaped despite being surrounded by American troops.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of The British Raid on Essex: The Forgotten Battle of the War of 1812 is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Wesleyan University Press.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Wesleyan University Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/british-raid-essex-jerry-roberts

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BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 95)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 95 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 85 The Heathen School with John Demos

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Dr. John Demos, the author of the book The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic.

Bio – Dr. John Demos

The Heathen School with John Demos on Fieldstone Common

Photo: Michael Lionstar

John Demos is the Samuel Knight Professor Emeritus of History at Yale University. He was born and raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He graduated from Harvard College, and received his graduate training at Oxford, the University of California at Berkeley, and Harvard. Some of his books include A Little Commonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony, Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England, for which he received the Bancroft Prize, and The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America which won the Francis Parkman Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Award.

Book Summary

The astonishing story of a unique missionary project—and the America it embodied—from award-winning historian John Demos.

Near the start of the nineteenth century, as the newly established United States looked outward toward the wider world, a group of eminent Protestant ministers formed a grand scheme for gathering the rest of mankind into the redemptive fold of Christianity and “civilization.” Its core element was a special school for “heathen youth” drawn from all parts of the earth, including the Pacific Islands, China, India, and, increasingly, the native nations of North America. If all went well, graduates would return to join similar projects in their respective homelands. For some years, the school prospered, indeed became quite famous. However, when two Cherokee students courted and married local women, public resolve—and fundamental ideals—were put to a severe test.

The Heathen School follows the progress, and the demise, of this first true melting pot through the lives of individual students: among them, Henry Obookiah, a young Hawaiian who ran away from home and worked as a seaman in the China Trade before ending up in New England; John Ridge, son of a powerful Cherokee chief and subsequently a leader in the process of Indian “removal”; and Elias Boudinot, editor of the first newspaper published by and for Native Americans. From its birth as a beacon of hope for universal “salvation,” the heathen school descends into bitter controversy, as American racial attitudes harden and intensify. Instead of encouraging reconciliation, the school exposes the limits of tolerance and sets off a chain of events that will culminate tragically in the Trail of Tears.

In The Heathen School, John Demos marshals his deep empathy and feel for the textures of history to tell a moving story of families and communities—and to probe the very roots of American identity.

Publication Info The Heathen School with John Demos on Fieldstone Common

Title: The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic

Publisher: Knopf (2014)

Hard cover; 337 pages with with end notes, an index and eight pages of photographs.

The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

John Demos and I dive into the details of this unusual tale of Christianity and Mission schools in the early 19th century. The twist to the story is that the Mission was located in the small town of Cornwall, Connecticut not half way around the world. We talk about the motivations and goals of the Christians and the fate of the students. Of course, we talk about how this local story has national prominence with the connection to Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears. A truly fascinating story.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic was given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Knopf.

The winner is:

  • Jack Vietas of Taiwan

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Knopf for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/the-heathen-school-john-demos

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 85)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 85 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 84 – African American Connecticut Explored with Katherine Harris

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Dr. Katherine J. Harris, one of the main contributors to the book African American Connecticut Explored.

Bio – Dr. Katherine Harris

Katherine J. Harris, Ph.D. is a lecturer at Central Connecticut State University. She serves on the State Historic Preservation Council and the site selection committee for the Connecticut Freedom Trail. She is the author of Pan-African Language Systems: Ebonics and African Oral Heritage, African and American Values: Liberia and West Africa, The American Values Projected Abroad Series, and Franklin D. Roosevelt’s African Diplomacy is due out soon.

African American Connecticut Explored on Fieldstone Common

The Book Team: (left to right) Elizabeth J. Normen, Katherine J. Harris, Wm. Frank Mitchell, Stacey K. Close, Olivia White. (Photo by John Groo.)

Book Summary

The numerous essays by many of the state’s leading historians in African American Connecticut Explored document an array of subjects beginning from the earliest years of the state’s colonization around 1630 and continuing well into the 20th century. The voice of Connecticut’s African Americans rings clear through topics such as the Black Governors of Connecticut, nationally prominent black abolitionists like the reverends Amos Beman and James Pennington, the African American community’s response to the Amistad trial, the letters of Joseph O. Cross of the 29th Regiment of Colored Volunteers in the Civil War, and the Civil Rights work of baseball great Jackie Robinson (a twenty-year resident of Stamford), to name a few. Insightful introductions to each section explore broader issues faced by the state’s African American residents as they struggled for full rights as citizens. This book represents the collaborative effort of Connecticut Explored and the Amistad Center for Art & Culture, with support from the State Historic Preservation Office and Connecticut’s Freedom Trail. It will be a valuable guide for anyone interested in this fascinating area of Connecticut’s history.

Contributors include Billie M. Anthony, Christopher Baker, Whitney Bayers, Barbara Beeching, Andra Chantim, Stacey K. Close, Jessica Colebrook, Christopher Collier, Hildegard Cummings, Barbara Donahue, Mary M. Donohue, Nancy Finlay, Jessica A. Gresko, Katherine J. Harris, Charles (Ben) Hawley, Peter Hinks, Graham Russell Gao Hodges, Eileen Hurst, Dawn Byron Hutchins, Carolyn B. Ivanoff, Joan Jacobs, Mark H. Jones, Joel Lang, Melonae’ McLean, Wm. Frank Mitchell, Hilary Moss, Cora Murray, Elizabeth J. Normen, Elisabeth Petry, Cynthia Reik, Ann Y. Smith, John Wood Sweet, Charles A. Teale Sr., Barbara M. Tucker, Tamara Verrett, Liz Warner, David O. White, and Yohuru Williams.

Publication InfoAfrican American Connecticut Explored on Fieldstone Common

Title: African American Connecticut Explored

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press (2013)

Hard cover; 422 pages with with end notes for many chapters, bibliography, an index and some photos.

African American Connecticut Explored is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

Dr. Harris and I talked about the history of slavery in Connecticut, when it started and how it ended. We also talked about the unusual practice of the African American community, starting in the 1700s, to elect Black Governors. We talked about successful New Haven resident William Lanson. And Martin Luther King Jr. even made a cameo appearance in this discussion of Connecticut history.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of African American Connecticut Exploredwas given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Wesleyan University Press.

The winner is:

  • Cheryll Toney Holley of Massachusetts

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Wesleyan University Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/african-american-ct-katherine-harris

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 84)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 84 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 81 Through a Different Lens with Tasha Caswell

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Tasha Caswell, curator of the exhibit Through a Different Lens: Three Connecticut Women Photographers at the Connecticut Historical Society.

Bio – Tasha Caswell

Tasha Caswell on Fieldstone Common

photo by Kyle Sprague

Tasha Caswell is the Thorne-McKenna Curatorial Assistant at the Connecticut Historical Society. Since last October, she has been working to catalog and digitize the photographs by Harriet V.S. Thorne and Rosalie Thorne McKenna that were recently given to CHS by the Rosalie Thorne McKenna Foundation. Tasha has degrees from Ryerson University and George Eastman House, the University of Toronto, and Lewis & Clark College. She recently completed a ten-month student residency at George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography and Film, where she catalogued 19th- and 20th-century and contemporary photographic and audiovisual materials.

Book Summary

This exhibition at the Connecticut Historical Society (October 11, 2013 – March 29, 2014) presents the work of three female photographers, who came from very different places in Connecticut history and society. Each of their photographs is a record of personal and local history, a picture of the people, landscapes, and buildings of Connecticut. Together they reveal how women have taken part in amateur and professional photography from the late 1800s into the mid 1900s.

Publication Info Through a Different Lens: Connecticut Women Photographers

Title: Through a Different Lens: Three Connecticut Women Photographers

Publisher: Connecticut Historical Society (2013)

Exhibition Publication, 38 pages

Through a Different Lens: Three Connecticut Women Photographers is available for purchase fromthe Connecticut Historical Society.

The Interview

Tasha and I spoke about the three pioneering women photographers featured in the exhibit: Harriet Van Schoonhoven Thorne (1843-1926), Rosalie Thorne McKenna (1916-2003) and Marie Hartig Kendall (1854-1943). Harriet Thorne was from a wealthy family and focused her photography on portraits, mostly of her family. Her great granddaughter, Rosalie McKenna became a professional photographer before discovering her own ancestor’s connection with photography. She also did mostly portraits with some photos of Stonington, Connecticut where she lived. Marie Hartig Kendall, was a photographer and business woman who sold her photographs where ever she could. She focused extensively on the town of Norfolk, Connecticut. We also talked about what a curator looks for when creating an exhibit.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winners

One copy of Through a Different Lens: Three Connecticut Women Photographerswas given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the Connecticut Historical Society.

The winner is:

  • Leslie Wolfgang of Connecticut

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to the Connecticut Historical Society for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/different-lens-tasha-caswell

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 81)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 81 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 73 Becoming Tom Thumb with Eric Lehman

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Eric D. Lehman, author of the book Becoming Tom Thumb: Charles Stratton, P. T. Barnum, and the Dawn of American Celebrity.

Bio

Eric D. Lehman directs the creative writing program at the University of Bridgeport, as well as teaching both writing and literature. Although he has taught over twenty different courses, his signature class is the Literature of Travel and Adventure. He is the editor of the school literary magazine, Groundswell, and of the faculty essay series, The Have you listened to the interview with George Morgan and Drew Smith yet? You won't want to miss this one! www.FieldstoneCommon.comCommons. In his spare time, he researches Henry Miller, writing academic essays for Nexus: The International Henry Miller Journal.

In addition to Becoming Tom Thumb, Eric has published six books including: A History of Connecticut Wine: Vineyard in Your Backyard, Bridgeport: Tales from the Park City, Hamden: Tales from the Sleeping Giant; Insiders’ Guide to Connecticut, A History of Connecticut Food, co-written with his wife, and Afoot in Connecticut.

Eric is also an editor of and contributor to the Connecticut Literary Collective, a guide to literary journals for Connecticut writers. His essays, reviews, poems, and stories have been published in dozens of journals and magazines such as The Writer, Gastronomica, Antique Trader, and the New Haven Review.

Originally from Wyomissing, Pennsylvania, he moved to Connecticut fifteen years ago and fell in love with the state. He believes that history and travel help us know the place we live, and therefore know ourselves.

You can learn more about Eric Lehman at his website.

Book Summary

When P. T. Barnum met twenty-five-inch-tall Charles Stratton at a Bridgeport, Connecticut hotel in 1843, one of the most important partnerships in entertainment history was born. Gravestone of General Tom Thumb aka Charles StrattonWith Barnum’s promotional skills and the miniature Stratton’s comedic talents, they charmed a Who’s Who of the 19th century, from Queen Victoria to Charles Dickens to Abraham Lincoln. Adored worldwide as “General Tom Thumb,” Stratton played to sold-out shows for almost forty years. From his days as a precocious child star to his tragic early death, Becoming Tom Thumb tells the full story of this iconic figure for the first time. It details his triumphs on the New York stage, his epic celebrity wedding, and his around-the-world tour, drawing on newly available primary sources and interviews. From the mansions of Paris to the deserts of Australia, Stratton’s unique brand of Yankee comedy not only earned him the accolades of millions of fans, it helped move little people out of the side show and into the lime light.

Book InfoBecoming Tom Thumb by Eric D. Lehman on Fieldstone Common

Title: Becoming Tom Thumb: Charles Stratton, P. T. Barnum, and the Dawn of American Celebrity

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press (2013)

Hardcover; 246 pages with end notes, bibliography, an index and BxW photos and illustrations.

Becoming Tom Thumb is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Eric and I talk about Charles Stratton, the successful man. It’s hard to call him Tom Thumb after reading this book and seeing him as a real person. This story will challenge all the preconceived notions you have of General Tom Thumb. He was smart, talented, entertaining and a leader in his community. We discuss, as well, the success of P.T. Barnum and the prejudices faced by little people later in the 19th century.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Becoming Tom Thumb were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Wesleyan University Press.

The winners are:

  • Joan Conklin of Massachusetts
  • Melinda Tarbox of Texas

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to Wesleyan University Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/becoming-tom-thumb-eric-lehman/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 73)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 73 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 70 Post Roads and Iron Horses with Richard DeLuca

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Richard DeLuca, author of the book Post Roads and Iron Horses: Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam.

Bio

Richard DeLuca earned a Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree from Manhattan College in Post Roads and Iron Horses with Richard DeLuca on Fieldstone CommonNew York, and a Master of Science degree in transportation planning from the University of Connecticut at Storrs. He has ten years of experience in the field of engineering as a transportation planner with the Connecticut Department of Transportation and with the Central Connecticut Regional Planning Agency.

In 1978, he moved to San Francisco, after which he pursued a career as a writer, focusing on California history. He was a member of the California Historical Society, a volunteer teacher in the Society’s docent program, and past president of the Society’s docent association. His article on the Indian occupation of Alcatraz Island and the origins of the Native American civil rights movement was published in California History, and received the society’s Alice J. Clark award for twentieth-century history in 1984.

He and his wife returned to Connecticut in 1998. For the past ten years he has been at work on a two-volume history of Connecticut transportation from the colonial period to the present. The first volume, Post Roads & Iron Horses, was published by Wesleyan University Press in December of 2011, and covers the history of Connecticut transportation from colonial times through the age of steam. A second volume on transportation in the twentieth century is in progress. He has presented his research at several history conferences, including the Dublin Seminar, and published several articles in Connecticut History, the journal of the Association For The Study of Connecticut History. His latest article, Competition v. Monopoly: Transportation and the Law in Nineteenth Century Connecticut, appeared in the fall 2010 special issue of Connecticut History celebrating the 375th anniversary of the state’s founding. He also served as the membership chair for ASCH from 2003 to 2005, and is currently on the editorial board of Connecticut History.

You can contact Richard through the publicist at the Wesleyan University Press.

Book Summary

Post Roads & Iron Horses is the first book to look in detail at the turnpikes, steamboats, canals, railroads, and trolleys (street railroads) that helped define Connecticut and shape New England. Advances in transportation technology during the nineteenth century transformed the Constitution State from a rough network of colonial towns to an industrial powerhouse of the Gilded Age. From the race to build the Farmington Canal to the shift from water to rail transport, historian and transportation engineer Richard DeLuca gives us engaging stories and traces the significant themes that emerge as American innovators and financiers, lawyers and legislators, struggle to control the movement of passengers and goods in southern New England. The book contains over fifty historical images and maps, and provides an excellent point of view from which to interpret the history of New England as a whole.

Book InfoPost Roads and Iron Horses: Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam

Title: Post Roads and Iron Horses: Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press (2011)

Hardcover; 251 pages with 3 appendices, end notes, a bibliography, an index and lots of  BxW photos and illustrations.

Post Roads and Iron Horses is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

A discussion about transportation in Connecticut is a really a discussion about transportation in the Northeast. Connecticut is a main corridor for travel between New York and Boston. Likewise much travel northward to Springfield, Massachusetts, Vermont and New Hampshire happened via the Connecticut river. In this interview we talk about everything from Native American footpaths to town and country roads to steamboats, canals and, of course, iron horses (trains).

We discuss how people reacted to the arrival of railroads and the change from “local time” to standardized time because of train schedules. For more on the discussion of standardized time, Marian recommended checking out a recent episode, “On the Clock: A (Brief) History of Time” from the program Backstory with the American History Guys.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Post Roads and Iron Horses were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the Wesleyan University Press.

The winners are:

  • Leighton Symonds of New Hampshire
  • Sue Kissel of Arizona

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the Wesleyan University Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/post-roads-iron-horses-richard-deluca/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 70)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 70 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Show Notes: Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin

Connecticut's Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 1 August 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Lucianne Lavin about her book Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples: What Archeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

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You can learn more about Lucianne Lavin and her work at the Institute for American Indian Studies Museum and Research Center website. The museum is located in Washington, Connecticut and is open to visitors. It also has many exhibits and educational programs.

Lucianne recommends that anyone interested in archaeology learn about standard methodology and techniques. One suggestion would be to get involved with your state archaeology office.  If you are located in Connecticut you can check out the Connecticut Office of State Archaeology.

Also, check local community colleges for archaeology programs. The Norwalk Community College in Norwalk, Connecticut has a certificate program in archaeology as an avocation.

Yale University Press, the publisher of Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples: What Archeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in New York and Rhode Island. A big thank you to the Yale University Press for their generosity.

Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin

Connecticut's Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 1 August 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Lucianne Lavin, author of Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples: What Archeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures.

More than 10,000 years ago, people settled on lands that now lie within the boundaries of the state of Connecticut. Leaving no written records and scarce archaeological remains, these peoples and their communities have remained unknown to all but a few archaeologists and other scholars. This pioneering book is the first to provide a full account of Connecticut’s indigenous peoples, from the long-ago days of their arrival to the present day.

Lucianne Lavin draws on exciting new archaeological and ethnographic discoveries, Connecticut's Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin on Fieldstone Commoninterviews with Native Americans, rare documents including periodicals, archaeological reports, master’s theses and doctoral dissertations, conference papers, newspapers, and government records, as well as her own ongoing archaeological and documentary research. She creates a fascinating and remarkably detailed portrait of indigenous peoples in deep historic times before European contact and of their changing lives during the past 400 years of colonial and state history. This book brings to light the richness and diversity of Connecticut’s indigenous histories, corrects misinformation about the vanishing Connecticut Indian, and reveals the significant roles and contributions of Native Americans to modern-day Connecticut.

Lucianne Lavin is Director of Research and Collections at the Institute for American Indian Studies, a research museum and educational center in Washington, CT. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in anthropology from New York University. She is an archaeologist who has over 30 years of research and field experience in Northeastern archaeology and anthropology. Dr. Lavin has written over 100 professional publications and technical reports on the archaeology and ethnohistory of the Northeast.