FC 90 Fort Halifax with Daniel Tortora

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Daniel J. Tortora, the author of the book Fort Halifax: Winslow’s Historic Outpost.

Bio – Daniel J. Tortora

Daniel Tortora is an assistant professor of history at Colby College. An expert on early American and Native American history, he speaks extensively on the French and Indian Fort Halifax Winslow, Maine Habs photo (LOC)War and Revolutionary War eras. He leads battlefield and historic tours and has contributed to numerous films, archaeological projects, websites, exhibits and research projects. In 2011, he was appointed to the Fort Halifax Park Implementation Committee.

Book Summary

Winslow has grown up around Fort Halifax in its many, many incarnations. Beginning as a French and Indian War garrison and trading post, the fort welcomed historic figures from Benedict Arnold and Aaron Burr to Paul Revere and Chief Joseph Orono. Reduced to one small blockhouse in the 1800s, Fort Halifax hosted archaeologists, travelers, artists, politicians and students. The Flood of 1987 swept away the blockhouse, leaving the fort and its supporters to fight an uphill battle for reconstruction. Throughout varied iterations, uses, trials and tribulations, Fort Halifax has remained the symbol of a community. Join historian Daniel J. Tortora in this engaging narrative of Fort Halifax’s fight for survival. Meet the famous visitors to the fort, the local residents who have cared for it and the figures who have kept its memory relevant and its future hopeful.

Publication InfoFort Halifax with Daniel J. Tortora on Fieldstone Common

Title: Fort Halifax: Winslow’s Historic Outpost

Publisher: The History Press (2014)

Trade Paperback; 158 pages with end notes, a bibliography, an index, and some photos and illustrations.

Fort Halifax: Winslow’s Historic Outpost is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Daniel Tortora and I discuss the strategic location of Fort Halifax at the confluence of the Kennebec and Sebasticook rivers. Fort Halifax became the most northern outpost for the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Though the history of Fort Halifax as an active military outpost was short-lived it was witness to skirmishes with the Native American population and was host Benedict Arnold during the Revolutionary War.  Much of the story of Fort Halifax is the tenacity of its survival and its rebirth with the help of the Daughters of the American Revolution and devoted preservationists.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of Fort Halifax: Winslow’s Historic Outpost is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/fort-halifax-daniel-tortora

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 90)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 90 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 85 The Heathen School with John Demos

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Dr. John Demos, the author of the book The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic.

Bio – Dr. John Demos

The Heathen School with John Demos on Fieldstone Common

Photo: Michael Lionstar

John Demos is the Samuel Knight Professor Emeritus of History at Yale University. He was born and raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He graduated from Harvard College, and received his graduate training at Oxford, the University of California at Berkeley, and Harvard. Some of his books include A Little Commonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony, Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England, for which he received the Bancroft Prize, and The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America which won the Francis Parkman Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Award.

Book Summary

The astonishing story of a unique missionary project—and the America it embodied—from award-winning historian John Demos.

Near the start of the nineteenth century, as the newly established United States looked outward toward the wider world, a group of eminent Protestant ministers formed a grand scheme for gathering the rest of mankind into the redemptive fold of Christianity and “civilization.” Its core element was a special school for “heathen youth” drawn from all parts of the earth, including the Pacific Islands, China, India, and, increasingly, the native nations of North America. If all went well, graduates would return to join similar projects in their respective homelands. For some years, the school prospered, indeed became quite famous. However, when two Cherokee students courted and married local women, public resolve—and fundamental ideals—were put to a severe test.

The Heathen School follows the progress, and the demise, of this first true melting pot through the lives of individual students: among them, Henry Obookiah, a young Hawaiian who ran away from home and worked as a seaman in the China Trade before ending up in New England; John Ridge, son of a powerful Cherokee chief and subsequently a leader in the process of Indian “removal”; and Elias Boudinot, editor of the first newspaper published by and for Native Americans. From its birth as a beacon of hope for universal “salvation,” the heathen school descends into bitter controversy, as American racial attitudes harden and intensify. Instead of encouraging reconciliation, the school exposes the limits of tolerance and sets off a chain of events that will culminate tragically in the Trail of Tears.

In The Heathen School, John Demos marshals his deep empathy and feel for the textures of history to tell a moving story of families and communities—and to probe the very roots of American identity.

Publication Info The Heathen School with John Demos on Fieldstone Common

Title: The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic

Publisher: Knopf (2014)

Hard cover; 337 pages with with end notes, an index and eight pages of photographs.

The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

John Demos and I dive into the details of this unusual tale of Christianity and Mission schools in the early 19th century. The twist to the story is that the Mission was located in the small town of Cornwall, Connecticut not half way around the world. We talk about the motivations and goals of the Christians and the fate of the students. Of course, we talk about how this local story has national prominence with the connection to Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears. A truly fascinating story.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic was given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Knopf.

The winner is:

  • Jack Vietas of Taiwan

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Knopf for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/the-heathen-school-john-demos

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 85)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 85 is the number of the episode.

 

Show Notes: Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin

Connecticut's Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 1 August 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Lucianne Lavin about her book Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples: What Archeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

You can learn more about Lucianne Lavin and her work at the Institute for American Indian Studies Museum and Research Center website. The museum is located in Washington, Connecticut and is open to visitors. It also has many exhibits and educational programs.

Lucianne recommends that anyone interested in archaeology learn about standard methodology and techniques. One suggestion would be to get involved with your state archaeology office.  If you are located in Connecticut you can check out the Connecticut Office of State Archaeology.

Also, check local community colleges for archaeology programs. The Norwalk Community College in Norwalk, Connecticut has a certificate program in archaeology as an avocation.

Yale University Press, the publisher of Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples: What Archeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in New York and Rhode Island. A big thank you to the Yale University Press for their generosity.

Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin

Connecticut's Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin on Fieldstone CommonLIVE: THURSDAY, 1 August 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Lucianne Lavin, author of Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples: What Archeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures.

More than 10,000 years ago, people settled on lands that now lie within the boundaries of the state of Connecticut. Leaving no written records and scarce archaeological remains, these peoples and their communities have remained unknown to all but a few archaeologists and other scholars. This pioneering book is the first to provide a full account of Connecticut’s indigenous peoples, from the long-ago days of their arrival to the present day.

Lucianne Lavin draws on exciting new archaeological and ethnographic discoveries, Connecticut's Indigenous Peoples with Lucianne Lavin on Fieldstone Commoninterviews with Native Americans, rare documents including periodicals, archaeological reports, master’s theses and doctoral dissertations, conference papers, newspapers, and government records, as well as her own ongoing archaeological and documentary research. She creates a fascinating and remarkably detailed portrait of indigenous peoples in deep historic times before European contact and of their changing lives during the past 400 years of colonial and state history. This book brings to light the richness and diversity of Connecticut’s indigenous histories, corrects misinformation about the vanishing Connecticut Indian, and reveals the significant roles and contributions of Native Americans to modern-day Connecticut.

Lucianne Lavin is Director of Research and Collections at the Institute for American Indian Studies, a research museum and educational center in Washington, CT. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in anthropology from New York University. She is an archaeologist who has over 30 years of research and field experience in Northeastern archaeology and anthropology. Dr. Lavin has written over 100 professional publications and technical reports on the archaeology and ethnohistory of the Northeast.

 

Show Notes: Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic with Elaine Breslaw

Lotiions, Potions, Pills and Magice with Elaine Breslaw on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 20 June 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Elaine G. Breslaw about her book Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic: Health Care in Early America.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic, published by New York University Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

You can learn more about Elaine Breslaw at her website.

Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic takes a detailed look at the state of health care in early America starting with Native Americans just prior to the arrival of Europeans. During the discussion we explore the effectiveness of health care in America as well what kinds of treatments were used before the age of modern medicine. We also take a look at non-traditional practitioners such as midwives, Native American Shamans and African Obeahs.

New York University Press, the publisher of Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Connecticut and Michigan. A big thank you to the New York University Press for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

You can read the full story of the cookbook (as mentioned during the show) — and see pictures of Gommy in her Lopez garden and even a link to one of her recipes — on the Heirloom Registry’s blog.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

The Indian Great Awakening with Linford Fisher

BlogPhoto-Fisher-coverLIVE: THURSDAY, 23 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Dr. Linford Fisher, author of The Indian Great Awakening: Religion and the Shaping of Native Culture in Early America.

The First Great Awakening was a time of heightened religious activity in the colonial New England. Among those whom the English settlers tried to convert to Christianity were the region’s native peoples. In this book, Linford Fisher tells the gripping story of American Indians’ attempts to wrestle with the ongoing realities of colonialism between the 1670s and 1820.

In particular, he looks at how some members of previously unevangelized Indian communities in Connecticut, Rhode Island, western Massachusetts, and Long Island adopted Christian practices, often joining local Congregational churches and receiving baptism. Far from passively sliding into the cultural and physical landscape after King Philip’s War, he argues, Native indivBlogPhoto-Fisher-headshotiduals and communities actively tapped into transatlantic structures of power to protect their land rights, welcomed educational opportunities for their children, and joined local white churches.

Charting this untold story of the Great Awakening and the resultant rise of an Indian Separatism and its effects on Indian cultures as a whole, this gracefully written book challenges long-held notions about religion and Native-Anglo-American interaction

Linford Fisher is an assistant professor of history at Brown University. He received his doctorate from Harvard University in 2008 and taught for a year in the Indiana University system before coming to Brown in 2009. His research field is early American history, including the history of religion in America and Native American history.

 

 

Show Notes – New England Captives Carried to Canada

New England Captives Carried to Canada with Donald R. Friary on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 11 April 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Donald R. Friary about the book New England Captives Carried to Canada.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

New England Captives Carried to Canada, published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society online bookstore.

Donald R. Friary wrote the foreward to New England Captives Carried to Canada. This is a re-release of the 1925 book by Emma Lewis Coleman. Donald Friary was the Executive Director of Historic Deerfield for 27 years. Deerfield is well known for being the site of a massive French and Indian raid in 1704 where 112 captives were forced to march to Quebec.

Historic Deerfield is now a collection of historic house museums located in one of the most picturesque neighborhoods in New England. It is located about a half hour north of Springfield, Massachusetts. On the same street is the historic Deerfield Inn in case you decide to make a visit.

The New England Historic Genealogical Society, the publisher of New England Captives Carried to Canada, donated two copies of the book which were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Arizona and England. A big thank you to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

New England Captives Carried to Canada with Donald Friary

LIVE: THURSDAY, 11 April 2013 at 1:00pm EDTNew England Captives Carried to Canada with Donald R. Friary on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Donald R. Friary who wrote the forward for the new edition of New England Captives Carried to Canada.

Originally published in two volumes in 1925, New England Captives Carried to Canada represents decades of research conducted by Coleman and C. Alice Baker (author of True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada, 1897).

This work names all the captives the two women discovered, provides biographical data for each, and paints a detailed picture of the Indian attacks on New England communities over the eighty-year period. Includes sources, a comprehensive index, and an appendix with greater explanation of terms, key people, and places mentioned in the text. For nearly a century, this has been the go-to resource and the most definitive work ever published on the subject.

Donald R. Friary was Executive Director of Historic Deerfield in Deerfield, Massachusetts New England Captives Carried to Canada with Donald R. Friary on Fieldstone Commonfor 27 years. After his retirement in 2003 he became Historic Deerfield’s Senior Research Fellow. A native of Boston, and a graduate of the Boston Latin School and Brown University, he holds a Ph.D. in American Civilization from the University of Pennsylvania. He served as the museum’s first Director of Academic Programs from 1971 to 1973 and was named Assistant Director and then Executive Director in 1975. He has served on a number of Boards including the Bay State Historical League, the Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife, the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Winterthur Museum’s Education Committee, and the Hill-Stead Museum.

Show Notes – Down East Schooners & Shipmaster with Ingrid Grenon

*** Houstory Scavenger Hunt Info ***

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 28 February 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Ingrid Grenon, author of Down East Schooners and Shipmasters.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Common on Blog Talk Radio

Down East Schooners and Shipmasters was published by The History Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

Down East Schooners and Shipmasters covers the early history of Down East Maine from 400 years ago starting with Native Americans and exploration by the French. The book continues on with stories of the “Rusticators” who settled Maine and the ship builders, sailors and shipmasters that heavily populated the area.  Three generations of the Foss family figures prominently in the book.

The History Press, the publisher of Down East Schooners & Shipmasters, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in New Jersey and Massachusetts.  A big thank you to The History Press for  their generosity!

*** Houstory Scavenger Hunt Info ***

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Down East Schooners and Shipmasters with Ingrid Grenon

Down East Schooners and Shipmasters with Ingrid Grenon on Fieldstone Common

LIVE: THURSDAY, 28 February 2013 at 1:00pm EST 

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Ingrid Grenon, author of Down East Schooners and Shipmasters.

Nothing is more iconic of Maine than the image of a majestic vessel—masts raised—gliding through the fog on the dark North Atlantic. From the early days of the search for a Northwest Passage to the quest for the mysterious and illusive Norumbega, the history of Mount Desert Island, Hancock, Bar Harbor and the rest of the Down East area has always traveled on schooners. Now, in the twenty-first century, these ships and their heritage are being preserved, and Mainers are sailing aboard them once again. In this collection, author Ingrid Grenon presents the most important and incredible stories from the decks of Down East’s schooners, revealing how these remarkable vessels and Down East Maine are tied together.

Down East Schooners and Shipmasters with Ingrid Grenon on Fieldstone Common

Ingrid Grenon was born in Maine, where she grew up in proximity to many treasures of previous centuries. Ingrid currently resides in southeastern Massachusetts, where she owns a small horse farm and is employed by the State Department of Developmental Disabilities. She holds a degree in psychology, as well as a degree in equestrian science, and also has a riding master’s degree. In addition, Ingrid has a diploma in horseshoeing science from Oklahoma Farrier’s College. She is also a published poet.

Ingrid is a member of the Boothbay Region Historical Society, the Somerset Historical Society, the Braintree Historical Society, the Mount Desert Island Historical Society, the Maine Maritime Museum, the Penobscot Marine Museum and the Maine Historical Society.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis