FC 97 An Extraordinary Family with Liz Petry

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is author Liz Petry. This week’s discussion is a little different because we are not speaking about a particular book. Instead we are talking with Liz about her inspirational and extraordinary family which include two of the first licensed African American Pharmacists in the state of Connecticut and her mother, Ann Petry who was the first best selling female African American author.

Bio – Liz Petry

With more than 10 years of experience in journalism and a degree in law, Liz Petry has Elisabeth Petryfound great rewards in researching and writing two books about aspects of the African American experience. Her first book “Can Anything Beat White?: A Black Family’s Letters,” explored the lives of her maternal grandmother’s family as they traveled to Hawaii, the Philippines and parts of the Deep South between the 1890s and 1910. Her second book, “At Home Inside: A Daughter’s Tribute to Ann Petry,” is a memoir about her amazing and multifaceted mother, the renowned author, Ann Petry. Liz is currently working on a new non-fiction book that engages topics beyond her family and beyond the twentieth century.

Publication Info

Title: Connecticut Explored Magazine

Publication Date: Fall 2014

Article: “Just Like Georgia Except for the Climate,” by Elisabeth Petry

The Interview

In this interview Liz Petry and I discuss her family’s transformation from Southern escaped slaves to educated middle class residents of Connecticut. Her grandfather, Peter Lane, was the first male African American pharmacist in the State of Connecticut and her great aunt, Anna Louise James, was the first female African American pharmacist. Her mother was the first African American Best Selling Author in the United States. We dig deep into her heritage and discuss the successes and challenges that her family has faced through the generations.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Books by Ann Petry

Please see the WikiPedia listing above for other books by Ann Petry.

Books By Liz Petry

Prize Winner

A one-year subscription to Connecticut Explored Magazine is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Connecticut Explored.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Connecticut Explored Magazine for their generosity in donating the subscription!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/liz-petry

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 97)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 97 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 84 – African American Connecticut Explored with Katherine Harris

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Dr. Katherine J. Harris, one of the main contributors to the book African American Connecticut Explored.

Bio – Dr. Katherine Harris

Katherine J. Harris, Ph.D. is a lecturer at Central Connecticut State University. She serves on the State Historic Preservation Council and the site selection committee for the Connecticut Freedom Trail. She is the author of Pan-African Language Systems: Ebonics and African Oral Heritage, African and American Values: Liberia and West Africa, The American Values Projected Abroad Series, and Franklin D. Roosevelt’s African Diplomacy is due out soon.

African American Connecticut Explored on Fieldstone Common

The Book Team: (left to right) Elizabeth J. Normen, Katherine J. Harris, Wm. Frank Mitchell, Stacey K. Close, Olivia White. (Photo by John Groo.)

Book Summary

The numerous essays by many of the state’s leading historians in African American Connecticut Explored document an array of subjects beginning from the earliest years of the state’s colonization around 1630 and continuing well into the 20th century. The voice of Connecticut’s African Americans rings clear through topics such as the Black Governors of Connecticut, nationally prominent black abolitionists like the reverends Amos Beman and James Pennington, the African American community’s response to the Amistad trial, the letters of Joseph O. Cross of the 29th Regiment of Colored Volunteers in the Civil War, and the Civil Rights work of baseball great Jackie Robinson (a twenty-year resident of Stamford), to name a few. Insightful introductions to each section explore broader issues faced by the state’s African American residents as they struggled for full rights as citizens. This book represents the collaborative effort of Connecticut Explored and the Amistad Center for Art & Culture, with support from the State Historic Preservation Office and Connecticut’s Freedom Trail. It will be a valuable guide for anyone interested in this fascinating area of Connecticut’s history.

Contributors include Billie M. Anthony, Christopher Baker, Whitney Bayers, Barbara Beeching, Andra Chantim, Stacey K. Close, Jessica Colebrook, Christopher Collier, Hildegard Cummings, Barbara Donahue, Mary M. Donohue, Nancy Finlay, Jessica A. Gresko, Katherine J. Harris, Charles (Ben) Hawley, Peter Hinks, Graham Russell Gao Hodges, Eileen Hurst, Dawn Byron Hutchins, Carolyn B. Ivanoff, Joan Jacobs, Mark H. Jones, Joel Lang, Melonae’ McLean, Wm. Frank Mitchell, Hilary Moss, Cora Murray, Elizabeth J. Normen, Elisabeth Petry, Cynthia Reik, Ann Y. Smith, John Wood Sweet, Charles A. Teale Sr., Barbara M. Tucker, Tamara Verrett, Liz Warner, David O. White, and Yohuru Williams.

Publication InfoAfrican American Connecticut Explored on Fieldstone Common

Title: African American Connecticut Explored

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press (2013)

Hard cover; 422 pages with with end notes for many chapters, bibliography, an index and some photos.

African American Connecticut Explored is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

Dr. Harris and I talked about the history of slavery in Connecticut, when it started and how it ended. We also talked about the unusual practice of the African American community, starting in the 1700s, to elect Black Governors. We talked about successful New Haven resident William Lanson. And Martin Luther King Jr. even made a cameo appearance in this discussion of Connecticut history.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of African American Connecticut Exploredwas given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Wesleyan University Press.

The winner is:

  • Cheryll Toney Holley of Massachusetts

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Wesleyan University Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/african-american-ct-katherine-harris

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 84)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 84 is the number of the episode.

 

FC 79 The Underground Railroad on Long Island with Kathleen Velsor

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Kathleen G. Velsor, author of the book The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom.

Bio – Kathleen G. Velsor

Dr. Kathleen Gaffney Velsor is an associate professor in the School of Education at the State University of New York Old Westbury. She earned an undergraduate degree in fine The Underground Railroad on Long Island with Kathleen G. Velsor on Fieldsotne Commonarts and education from Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri, and received her master’s degree in educational administration from Lehigh University in Pennsylvania and her doctorate in educational research from the University of Cincinnati in Ohio. She has received numerous grants to research the Quaker involvement in the Underground Railroad on Long Island, most recent among them an education grant from the Long Island Community Foundation to establish the Underground Teaching Partnership to build community through interdisciplinary social studies workshops for schoolteachers.

Book Summary

From the arrival of the Quakers in the seventeenth century to the enforcement of the Emancipation Proclamation, Long Island played an important role in the Underground Railroad’s work to guide slaves to freedom. In Old Westbury, the Post family established a major stop on the freedom trail with the help of an escaped Virginia slave. In Jericho, families helped escaping slaves to freedom from the present-day Maine Maid Inn. Elias Hicks helped free 191 slaves himself and worked to create Underground Railroad safe houses in many northeastern cities. Some former slaves even established permanent communities across the island. Visit the safe houses many of which are still standing today and explore the journey of runaway slaves on Long Island.

Book InfoThe Underground Railroad on Long Island with Kathleen G. Velsor on Fieldsotne Common

Title: The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom

Publisher: The History Press (2013)

Trade Paperback; 144 pages; with end notes, bibliography, index and BxW photos & illustrations.

The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

During the interview Kathleen and I discussed the long involvement of Quakers on Long Island with the anti-slavery movement. Around the time of the American Revolution Quakers started to become uncomfortable with the idea of any human being held in bondage. In the Long Island area Quakers were lead with the strong Leadership of Elias Hicks who rallied other Quakers to join his anti-slavery cause.  His followers were called Hicksite Quakers. Hicksites first manumitted their own slaves. As time passed they developed the network of the Underground Railroad and worked toward helping enslaved people to freedom as well as educating them in reading and writing and providing a trade.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winners

One copy of The Underground Railroad on Long Island: Friends in Freedom was given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of The History Press.

The winner is:

  • Vonda McCrae of Virginia

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to The History Press for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
www.fieldstonecommon.com/underground-railroad-kathleen-velsor/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 78)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 78 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 77 The Manor with Mac Griswold

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Mac Griswold, author of the book The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island.

Bio – Mac Griswold

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0374266298?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0374266298&linkCode=xm2&tag=marsrooram-20

Mac Griswold photo by Sigrid Estrada

Mac Griswold is an acclaimed cultural landscape historian and writer. Rooted in a childhood spent exploring the castles and towers of lush north central New Jersey, Mac went on to study landscape design at the Radcliffe Seminars and horticulture at the New York Botanical Gardens.

She is the author of Washington’s Gardens at Mount Vernon: Landscape of the Inner Man, Pleasure of the Garden: Images from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Golden Age of American Gardens: Proud Owners, Private Estates, with Eleanor Weller.

She taught landscape history at Sarah Lawrence College, where she was a recipient of the Noble Chair in Art and Cultural History, and has lectured widely in America and Europe. A Guggenheim fellow, she has written for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Travel + Leisure.

You can learn more about Mac Griswold at her author website, www.macgriswold.com. Learn more about Sylvestor Manor from their website, www.sylvestermanor.org.

Book Summary

Mac Griswold’s The Manor is the biography of a uniquely American place that has endured through wars great and small, through fortunes won and lost, through histories bright and sinister—and of the family that has lived there since its founding as a New England slave plantation three and a half centuries ago.

In 1984, the landscape historian Mac Griswold was rowing along a Long Island creek when she came upon a stately yellow house and a garden guarded by looming boxwoods. She instantly knew that boxwoods that large—twelve feet tall, fifteen feet wide—had to be hundreds of years old. So, as it happened, was the house: Sylvester Manor had been held in the same family for eleven generations.

Formerly encompassing all of Shelter Island, a pearl of 8,000 acres caught between the North and South Forks of Long Island, the manor had dwindled to 243 acres. Still, its hidden vault proved to be full of revelations and treasures, including the 1666 charter for the land, and correspondence from Thomas Jefferson. Most notable was the short and steep flight of steps the family had called the “slave staircase,” which would provide clues to the extensive but little-known story of Northern slavery. Alongside a team of archaeologists, Griswold began a dig that would uncover a landscape bursting with stories.

Based on years of archival and field research, as well as voyages to Africa, the West Indies, and Europe, The Manor is at once an investigation into forgotten lives and a sweeping drama that captures our history in all its richness and suffering.

 

Book InfoThe Manor by Mac Griswold on Fieldstone Common

Title: The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island

Publisher: Farrar, Strouss & Giroux (2013)

Hardcover; 273 pages with end notes, a bibliography, an index as well as BxW photos.

The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

Mac Griswold and I discuss the 17th century origins of Nathaniel Sylvester and his wife Grizell Brinley who developed the Manor on Shelter Island, Long Island, New York.  The home remains in the hands of descendants of the same family today. Slavery existed on Sylvester Manor as well as on Constant Plantation in Barbados, the estate of Nathaniel’s brother Sylvester. Mac makes interesting use of a treasure trove of original records and we discuss what was available and how it helped her research for the book.

Prize Winners

One copy of The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island was given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Farrar, Strouss & Giroux.

The winner is:

  • Carol Ubosi of Maryland

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to Farrar, Strouss & Giroux for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/the-manor-mac-griswold

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 77)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 77 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 66 A Discussion with Elizabeth Shown Mills

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Elizabeth Shown Mills, best known as the author of Evidence Explained. In this episode we will be having a discussion on slavery, race, research and writing centered on her two books, Isle of Canes and The Forgotten People which both focus on Cane River’s Creoles of Color.

Bio

Elizabeth Shown Mills is an internationally acclaimed historical researcher and writer who has spent her life studying American culture and the relationships between people–Elizabeth Shown Mills on Fieldstone Commonemotional as well as genetic. Featured on BBC, CNN, PBS, and other networks in the U.S., U.K., and Australia, she has been widely cited as “the genealogist who has had the most influence in the post-Roots era.”

Her 13 prize-winning books range from reference works such as Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace to the historical novel, Isle of Canes, which chronicles a family of freed slaves across four generations, and is drawn from Mills’s own research in the archives of six nations. She is also the editor of Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians.

In 2011, Elizabeth Shown Mills launched an academic website called Historic Pathways that houses digitized versions of articles she has published. The site broadcasts her fascinating and important work to a worldwide audience.

You can also follow Elizabeth on the Evidence Explained Facebook page and the Evidence Explained website.

Book Summary

Isle of Canes and The Forgotten People both focus on the Cane River’s Creoles of Color. The Isle of Canes is a fictional account and The Forgotten People is an academic work of non-fiction. Both provide and exceptional view into the lives and culture of the Creole people of Louisiana.

Book Info – The Forgotten PeopleThe Forgotten People by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Title: The Forgotten People: Cane River’s Creoles of Color

Publisher: Louisiana State University Press (Nov. 2013)

Trade paperback; 416 pages with bibliography, index, end notes and a photo essay.

The Forgotten People is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Book Info – Isle of CanesIsle of Canes by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Title: Isle of Canes

Publisher: Turner Publishing (2006)

Trade paperback; 583 pages.

Isle of Canes is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we get into a discussion about the complexity of slavery, race, religion and culture and then segue that into a discussion about research and writing.

Prize Winners

Five books by Elizabeth Shown Mills were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the publishers – Turner Publishing, The Louisiana State University Press and the Genealogical Publishing Company.

The winners are:

The Forgotten People – Brenda Lybbert of Washington

Isle Canes – Lori Lynn Price of Massachusetts

Evidence Explained (3 winners)

  • Libbi Crowe of Florida
  • Crystal Cuelho of California
  • Bill Nelson of Massachusetts

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to Turner Publishing, The Louisiana State University Press and the Genealogical Publishing Company for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 66)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 63 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 058 Discovering Black Vermont with Elise Guyette

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Elise Guyette, author of the book Discovering Black Vermont: African American Farmers in Hinesburgh, 1790-1890.

Discovering Black Vermont with Elise Guyette on Fieldstone CommonBio

ELISE A. GUYETTE, Ed.D., is a historian active in efforts to develop Vermont’s diversity curriculum in K–12 schools.

Book Summary

Vermont is often regarded as the “whitest” US state. Dig a little deeper and you will realize that Vermont is steeped in the history of many cultures including African Americans. Discovering Black Vermont traces three generations of free blacks who built a life farming in northern Vermont. By using historical records, Elise Guyette pieces together this forgotten piece of history.

Fieldstone Common host Marian Pierre-Louis and Elise Guyette dig into what life was like for these families starting with their arrival in Vermont in the 1790s.

Book InfoDiscovering Black Vermont with Elise Guyette on Fieldstone Common

Title: Discovering Black Vermont: African American Farmers in Hinesburgh, 1790-1890
Publisher: University Press of New England (2010)
Trade Paperback; 213 pages with end notes, bibliography, index and some BxW photos  and illustrations.

Discovering Black Vermont is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Discovering Black Vermont were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the University Press of New England.

The winners were:

  • Kyle Johnson of Massachusetts
  • Elroy Davis of Vermont

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the University Press of New England for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

News & Announcements

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 058)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 58 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 feed is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the link above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Discovering Black Vermont with Elise Guyette

Next episode: Thursday, 26 September 2013Discovering Black Vermont with Elise Guyette on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Elise Guyette, author of Discovering Black Vermont.

An impressive work of historical recovery, Discovering Black Vermont tells the story of three generations of free blacks trying to build a life and community in northern Vermont in the years following statehood. By piecing together fragments of the history of free blacks in Vermont–tax and estate records, journals, diaries, and the like–the author recovers what is essentially a lost world, establishing a framework for using primary sources to document a forgotten past. The book is an invaluable resource for those conducting local history research and will serve as inspiration for high school and college students and their teachers.

Discovering Black Vermont with Elise Guyette on Fieldstone CommonWhen she was in 4th grade, Elise A. Guyette discovered that her people, French-Canadian, Lebanese, and Irish, were left out of her Vermont history text. When she began teaching, she was given the same little green textbook to teach her first students. It reminded her of the sting of being overlooked and, as a result, she has spent her adult life in pursuit of stories omitted from traditional histories. Guyette is an historian, writer, and educational consultant, who is a part-time faculty member at the University of Vermont. She has taught history workshops for teachers throughout the United States, and in China and South Africa. Her publications include the textbook, Vermont: A Cultural Patchwork; a teacher’s guide for Making a Living: The Work Experiences of African Americans in New England; Gandhi in South Africa: A Perfect Miracle or Political Expediency; and Behind the White Veil: A History of Vermont’s Ethnic Groups in Many Cultures, One People: A Multicultural Handbook for Teachers. Her newest book tells the history of the United States in microcosm from 1790 to 1890, from the viewpoint of African American farmers in northern Vermont.

 

Show Notes: The North End with Alex Goldfeld

The North End with Alex R. Goldfeld on Feildstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 27 June 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Alex R. Goldfeld about his book The North End: A Brief History of Boston’s Oldest Neighborhood.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

The North End, published by The History Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Alex Goldfeld is a public historian based in Boston, Massachusetts. You can learn more about Alex Goldfeld at his website. Alex is also the President and Historian of the North End Historical Society. They have a website and a Facebook page.

The North End covers nearly 400 years of history starting with the creation of the Puritan The North End by Alex R. Goldfeldsettlement in 1630 and progressing through the American Revolution and includes the impact of major ethnic groups such as African Americans and the Irish. Many critical events at the start of the American Revolution took place in the North End. Today the North End is known as an Italian neighborhood with many top notch Italian restaurants and numerous Saints Festivals during the summer months.

The History Press, the publisher of The North End, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Arizona and New Hampshire. A big thank you to the The History Press for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Show Notes: Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic with Elaine Breslaw

Lotiions, Potions, Pills and Magice with Elaine Breslaw on Fieldstone CommonHere are some items that were mentioned during the 20 June 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Elaine G. Breslaw about her book Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic: Health Care in Early America.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic, published by New York University Press, is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

You can learn more about Elaine Breslaw at her website.

Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic takes a detailed look at the state of health care in early America starting with Native Americans just prior to the arrival of Europeans. During the discussion we explore the effectiveness of health care in America as well what kinds of treatments were used before the age of modern medicine. We also take a look at non-traditional practitioners such as midwives, Native American Shamans and African Obeahs.

New York University Press, the publisher of Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Connecticut and Michigan. A big thank you to the New York University Press for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

You can read the full story of the cookbook (as mentioned during the show) — and see pictures of Gommy in her Lopez garden and even a link to one of her recipes — on the Heirloom Registry’s blog.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

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Show Notes – Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 14 February 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with C.S. Manegold, author of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

You can learn more about C.S. Manegold  at her website as well as the site dedicated to to the book Ten Hills Farm.

Ten Hills Farm with C.S. Manegold on Fieldstone Common

Ten Hills Farm discusses the history of slavery in the north within the context of the property owners of farm through the centuries. The main characters discussed are Governor John Winthrop, Isaac Royall Sr. and Isaac Royall Jr.

The Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford, Massachusetts (a short drive from Boston) are owned and maintained by the Royall House Association. A great deal of information about the property and its history is available from the website. The property is open to the public between May and November. Check the website for details.

The book Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, published by Princeton University Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

C.S. Manegold is also the author of In Glory’s Shadow: The Citadel, Shannon Faulkner and a Changing Ameria.

During the show we discussed a conflict between Samuel Sewall and John Saffin over the issue of slavery (see pages 102-122 of Ten Hills Farm). One of the documents related to this disagreement, written by Sewall, is called “The Selling of Joseph” which can be viewed on the Massachusetts Historical Society website.

Princeton University Press, the publisher of Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, donated a copy of the book which was given as “door prize” during the live show to a listener in Texas.  A big thank you to Princeton University Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site. 

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

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Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis