FC 92 Uncommon Law with Paul Gillies

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Paul S. Gillies, the author of the book Uncommon Law, Ancient Roads, and Other Ruminations on Vermont Legal History. This book shows us the importance of understanding how laws came about and their significance in helping us understand history.

Bio – Paul S. GilliesUncommon Law with Paul Gillies on Fieldstone Common

Paul Gillies is a partner in the Montpelier, Vermont law firm of Tarrant, Gillies, Merriman & Richardson. He co-edited The Records of the Vermont Council of Censors with D. Gregory Sanford, and wrote A Book of Opinions with James H. Douglas and A Place to Pass Through: Berlin, Vermont 1820-1991. He is a co-founder of the Vermont Judicial History Society and the Vermont Institute for Government. A former Vermont Deputy Secretary of State, he is presently Moderator of the Town of Berlin.

Book Summary

The 25 essays collected in this new book from the Vermont Historical Society examine the founda­tions of legal thought in Vermont, historical issues ranging from log drives to the keeping of sheep to blue laws, the state’s legal luminaries, and contemporary issues including ancient roads and Act 250.

Vermont was born in conflict and existed as an independent political community until becoming the 14th state in 1791. During those early years Vermonters had to chart their own course in matters of law. From these unique origins, the history of law in Vermont traces the evolution of social and economic developments over time and provides a fascinating lens for understanding the history of the Green Mountain State.

Publication Info  Uncommon Law with Paul Gillies on Fieldstone Common

Title: Uncommon Law, Ancient Roads, and Other Ruminations on Vermont Legal History

Publisher: Vermont Historical Society (2013)

Trade Paperback; 414 pages with end notes, a bibliography, an index, and some photos and illustrations.

Uncommon Law, Ancient Roads, and Other Ruminations on Vermont Legal History is available for purchase from the Vermont Historical Society.

The Interview

In this interview Paul Gillies and I talk about a variety of items from Vermont legal history such as the implication of towns settling the first minister and distributing land to him. We also dig into the importance of fences and why they were needed over the centuries. We discuss ancients roads that are still legal roads even though they only exist on old maps. We also discover three luminary characters from Vermont legal history – Nathaniel Chipman, the scandalous Royall Tyler and John Mattocks.

Links mentioned during the interview:

Prize Winner

One copy of Uncommon Law, Ancient Roads, and Other Ruminations on Vermont Legal History is given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the Vermont Historical Society.

The winner is:

  • To be announced next week

Congratulations to our winner and thanks to the Vermont Historical Society for their generosity in donating the book!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is
http://www.fieldstonecommon.com/uncommon-law-paul-gillies

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 92)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 92 is the number of the episode.

 

Show Notes – Lost Babes with Melinde Lutz Byrne

Melinde Lutz ByrneFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 2 May 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Melinde Lutz Byrne about her book Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records, Essex County, Massachusetts, 1692-1745.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records, Essex County, Massachusetts, 1692-1745, published by the author (1992), is out of print. You can find it for sale from used booksellers but perhaps the best place to find it is at a local or regional library. Here is a link to the book on the Worldcat website. If you enter your zip code it will show you the library closest to you.

The first part of the show discussed the ins and outs of fornication cases and how the courts handled them from a legal point of view. We discussed what happened to the mothers, the fathers and the role of the midwife during labor.

In the second half of the show we discussed the Jane Doe forensic case involving an unidentified woman who was murdered in New Hampshire many years ago. Melinde described her involved in the case and the course she took on facial reconstruction.

Houstory, the makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry, donated two batches of Heirloom Registry registration numbers which were given as “door prizes” during the live show to listeners in Arizona and Ohio. A big thank you to Houstory for their generous donation!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts with Melinde Lutz Byrne

LIVE: THURSDAY, 2 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDTLost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records with Melinde Lutz Byrne on Fieldstone Common

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Melinde Lutz Byrne, CG, FASG, author of Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records, Essex County, Massachusetts, 1692-1745.

We will talk to Melinde about 17th and 18th century court records which are a rich source of information for historical and genealogical research.

Melinde Lutz Byrne, CG, FASG, is co-editor of the NGS Quarterly and Director of the Genealogical Research Certificate Program at Boston University. She is a cultural anthropologist and archivist by training and worked for Harvard’s Tozzer Anthropological Library. Melinde has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals. In 1993 a book she edited won several awards, including the Donald Lines Jacobus Award of Excellence. She has been an officer in state, regional, and national genealogical societies and has been Vice President of MGC. She currently serves as President of the American Society of Genealogists.

 

Show Notes – The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Mofford

The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 17 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Juliet Haines Mofford, author of The Devil Made Me Do It: Crime and Punishment in Early New England.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can connect with Juliet Mofford Haines on Facebook and LinkedIn. Juliet also gave out her email address during the show. Have a listen to the show to get that.

The book The Devil Made Me Do It, published by the Globe Pequot Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com

Juliet has published eleven books some of which include  

  • Cry “witch”: the Salem witch trials, 1692 (Discovery Enterprises, 1995) 
  • Greater Lawrence, a bibliography : an annotated guide to the history of Andover, Methuen, Lawrence, and North Andover (Merrimack Valley Textiles Museum, 1978) The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone Common
  • The history of North Parish Church of North Andover, 1645-1974: and firm thine ancient vow (Mofford, 1975). 

She has also written a number of history books targeted toward juvenile readers.

One of the places that Juliet mentions during the interview is the Old Gaol in York, Maine.  Juliet not only worked there previously but she also writes about it in the book. The Old Gaol is part of the The Old York Historical Society which has  number of historical buildings which you can visit.

The Globe Pequot Press, the publisher of The Devil Made Me Do It: Crime and Punishment in Early New England, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show. One copy went to a listener in Colorado and the other to a listener in Massachusetts. A big thank you to the Globe Pequot Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012. Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.


Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – The Naked Quaker with Diane Rapaport

The Naked Quaker with Diane Rapaport on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some notes on items that were mentioned during the 20 September 2012 Fieldstone Common interview with Diane Rapaport, author of the Naked Quaker.


The podcast of the interview is now available.

The Naked Quaker is readily available from online booksellers such as amazon.com.

Diane Rapaport’s other book is called New England Court Records: A Research Guide for Genealogists and Historians.

You can learn more about Diane by visiting her website or follow her on her Facebook page

For many years Diane wrote a column called “Tales from the Courthouse” which was first featured in New England Ancestors which later became American Ancestors. This publication is a membership benefit of the New England Historic Genealogical Society. In addition to the print magazine, members can search the online archive of American Ancestors to read Diane’s column. The magazine can also be found at many libraries and genealogical societies.

You can read an interview with Diane on the Bostonist website and another on Boston.com.

Check Diane’s schedule to see if she is speaking at a venue near you.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

The Naked Quaker with Diane Rapaport

The Naked Quaker by Diane Rapaport
The Naked Quaker by Diane Rapaport

LIVE: THURSDAY, 20 September 2012 at 1:00pm EST

Listen in to Fieldstone Common this week as host Marian Pierre-Louis talks to author Diane Rapaport about her book The Naked Quaker: True Crimes and Controversies from the Courts of Colonial New England.

The word “Puritan” conjures up dour images of 17th-century New Englanders. We rarely think of Puritans as people who had fun, or sex. Our ancestors used different words, but human nature was not so different 350 years ago.

In the title story, a Quaker woman walks into Puritan Sunday meeting and drops her dress to protest actions of the colonial authorities. The Naked Quaker takes us into the lives of our ancestors, revealing how they behaved and spoke. A highway robber threatens his victim: “I will take you by your eyelids and make your heels strike fire!” A mysterious woman wields “enthusiastical power” over married men, who break the law to follow her.

author Diane Rapaport

Diane Rapaport, a former trial lawyer, has made a new career as a historical consultant, genealogist, award-winning author and popular speaker. She offers an unusual combination of expertise and experience—in law, history and genealogy—and she enjoys discovering and telling the stories of our past. She specializes in court records and other historical resources of New England, and her current research focuses on African Americans and Native Americans in the colonial period. She is also the author of New England Court Records: A Research Guide for Genealogists and Historians.

Visit the Fieldstone Common Radio site and sign up to “follow” the show so you will get a reminder about the upcoming episode.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis