FC 71 Cambridge Cameos with Roger Thompson

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Roger Thompson, author of the book Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in 17th Century New England.

Roger is our first Fieldstone Common guest to make a second appearance on the show. He first appeared discussing his book From Deference to Defiance: Charlestown, Massachusetts 1629-1692. Roger lives in England so when he was visiting the United States this past summer I took advantage of fitting in a second interview with him.

This interview is a little different. It is not done in a studio but recorded live at his summer Cambridge Cameos with Roger Thomoson on Fieldstone Commonresidence in the very busy, bustling and noisy city of Cambridge, Massachusetts. So we will have some ambiance noise from this city in the background of the interview. I hope you won’t find that too distracting. It seems fitting somehow that we spoke in the heart of Cambridge since our discussion centered on the early history of that city.

Bio

Roger Thompson is emeritus professor of American Colonial History at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England.

In addition to From Deference to Defiance, Roger Thompson has written:

Book Summary

Cambridge Cameos contains forty-four sketches from the period 1651 to 1686 that combine good stories, intriguing personalities, and incidents involving mostly ordinary Cambridge people. They are based on thousands of original documents; virtually all primary sources with any bearing on the early history of Cambridge. Drawing on his vast knowledge of Middlesex County families and on his equally vast experience in the town and court records of that county, Roger Thompson has composed a number of delightful vignettes of early residents of the town of Cambridge. He provides us with a rare opportunity to hear these early New Englanders speak for themselves and to experience seventeenth-century life as directly as possible.

Book Info Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in Seventeenth-Century New England

Title: Cambridge Cameos: Stories of Life in 17th Century New England

Publisher: New England Historic Genealogical Society (2005)

Trade paperback; 355 pages with 2 appendices, footnotes notes, and an index.

Cambridge Cameos is available for purchase from the New England Historic Genealogical Society and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview Roger and I dive into all the fascinating aspects of life in the 1600s in Cambridge from the unusual ways people paid for their Harvard tuition to the culture of discipline and why female healers were often accused of witchcraft.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Cambridge Cameos were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

The winners are:

  • Jean Smoorenburg of Texas
  • Cynthia Bishop of Virginia

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the New England Historic Genealogical Society for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/cambridge-cameos-roger-thompson/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 70)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 70 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

 

FC 70 Post Roads and Iron Horses with Richard DeLuca

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Richard DeLuca, author of the book Post Roads and Iron Horses: Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam.

Bio

Richard DeLuca earned a Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree from Manhattan College in Post Roads and Iron Horses with Richard DeLuca on Fieldstone CommonNew York, and a Master of Science degree in transportation planning from the University of Connecticut at Storrs. He has ten years of experience in the field of engineering as a transportation planner with the Connecticut Department of Transportation and with the Central Connecticut Regional Planning Agency.

In 1978, he moved to San Francisco, after which he pursued a career as a writer, focusing on California history. He was a member of the California Historical Society, a volunteer teacher in the Society’s docent program, and past president of the Society’s docent association. His article on the Indian occupation of Alcatraz Island and the origins of the Native American civil rights movement was published in California History, and received the society’s Alice J. Clark award for twentieth-century history in 1984.

He and his wife returned to Connecticut in 1998. For the past ten years he has been at work on a two-volume history of Connecticut transportation from the colonial period to the present. The first volume, Post Roads & Iron Horses, was published by Wesleyan University Press in December of 2011, and covers the history of Connecticut transportation from colonial times through the age of steam. A second volume on transportation in the twentieth century is in progress. He has presented his research at several history conferences, including the Dublin Seminar, and published several articles in Connecticut History, the journal of the Association For The Study of Connecticut History. His latest article, Competition v. Monopoly: Transportation and the Law in Nineteenth Century Connecticut, appeared in the fall 2010 special issue of Connecticut History celebrating the 375th anniversary of the state’s founding. He also served as the membership chair for ASCH from 2003 to 2005, and is currently on the editorial board of Connecticut History.

You can contact Richard through the publicist at the Wesleyan University Press.

Book Summary

Post Roads & Iron Horses is the first book to look in detail at the turnpikes, steamboats, canals, railroads, and trolleys (street railroads) that helped define Connecticut and shape New England. Advances in transportation technology during the nineteenth century transformed the Constitution State from a rough network of colonial towns to an industrial powerhouse of the Gilded Age. From the race to build the Farmington Canal to the shift from water to rail transport, historian and transportation engineer Richard DeLuca gives us engaging stories and traces the significant themes that emerge as American innovators and financiers, lawyers and legislators, struggle to control the movement of passengers and goods in southern New England. The book contains over fifty historical images and maps, and provides an excellent point of view from which to interpret the history of New England as a whole.

Book InfoPost Roads and Iron Horses: Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam

Title: Post Roads and Iron Horses: Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press (2011)

Hardcover; 251 pages with 3 appendices, end notes, a bibliography, an index and lots of  BxW photos and illustrations.

Post Roads and Iron Horses is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

A discussion about transportation in Connecticut is a really a discussion about transportation in the Northeast. Connecticut is a main corridor for travel between New York and Boston. Likewise much travel northward to Springfield, Massachusetts, Vermont and New Hampshire happened via the Connecticut river. In this interview we talk about everything from Native American footpaths to town and country roads to steamboats, canals and, of course, iron horses (trains).

We discuss how people reacted to the arrival of railroads and the change from “local time” to standardized time because of train schedules. For more on the discussion of standardized time, Marian recommended checking out a recent episode, “On the Clock: A (Brief) History of Time” from the program Backstory with the American History Guys.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Post Roads and Iron Horses were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the Wesleyan University Press.

The winners are:

  • Leighton Symonds of New Hampshire
  • Sue Kissel of Arizona

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the Wesleyan University Press for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/post-roads-iron-horses-richard-deluca/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 70)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 70 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Second chance to win a copy of Remembering Adamsville

Remembering Adamsville by the Little Compton Historical SocietyWe have two more copies of Remembering Adamsville to give away!

The current Fieldstone Common episode is an interview with Little Compton, Rhode Island Historical Society Director, Marjory O’Toole about the book Remember Adamsville. This book is the result of a village-wide oral history project.

If you’re connected to Adamsville in Little Compton, Rhode Island or just interested in seeing the end-product of a really well done oral history project then this book is for you!

To qualify to win one of the two copies simply leave a comment on the Fieldstone Common Facebook page with your best tip for doing oral history interviews or projects. If you’re not on Facebook, you can send your tip via the Fieldstone Common contact form.

This is a one-day only giveaway. Post your tip by 9pm EST today, 18 December 2013.

FC 69 Remembering Adamsville Oral History Project with Marjory O’Toole

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Marjory O’Toole, editor of the book Remembering Adamsville which is the culmination of a village-wide oral history project.

Bio

Marjory O’Toole is the full-time Managing Director of the Little Compton, Rhode Island Historical Society and a part-time student in the John Nicholas Brown Public Humanities Marjory O'Toole Remembering AdamsvilleProgram at Brown University.

Marjory is a lifelong resident of Little Compton who fondly remembers trips to Adamsville with her grandmother to buy candy at Simmons’ Store. Today she lives a few miles away from the village with her husband and three children.

You can learn more about Marjory from her website.

Book Summary

Remembering Adamsville is the written end-product of an oral history project undertaken in the village of Adamsville in Little Compton, Rhode Island. The book chronicles the memories of many Adamsville residents and provides a solid representation of life in the village.

Book InfoRemembering Adamsville by the Little Compton Historical Society

Title: Remembering Adamsville

Publisher: Little Compton Historical Society (2013)

Trade paperback; 252 pages with an index and lots of color and BxW photos and illustrations. Alphabetical by participant.

Remembering Adamsville is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we talk about every aspect of conducting a town-wide oral history project from the volunteers needed to pull it off to engaging the interviewees. We’ve left no stone unturned during our discussion but perhaps most important was the powerful message that arose as a result the project. While collecting history is important, the coming together of a community and forging stronger ties with each other was perhaps the greatest benefit of all.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Remembering Adamsville were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of the Little Compton Historical Society.

The winners are:

  • Beth Finch McCarthy of Massachusetts
  • Candace Breen of Rhode Island

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to the Little Compton Historical Society for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/remembering-adamsville-oral-history-marjory-otoole/

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 69)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 69 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

FC 68 Colonial New England Speech with Joan Bines

This week on Fieldstone Common our featured guest is Joan Bines, author of the book Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now.

Bio

Joan Bines received her BA from Brandeis University and her doctorate from the Words They Lived ByUniversity of Virginia in American diplomatic history. After teaching for many years, she became director of the Golden Ball Tavern Museum, a gracious 1760s Georgian tavern and home in Weston, Massachusetts. Here with a dedicated group of volunteers, she oversaw and continues to oversee the preservation of the museum and to build its education and outreach programs. Here also, she has been able to indulge her love of words, their histories and meanings, as well as her love photography.

You can learn more about Joan’s photography at her website as well as check out information about the Golden Ball Tavern Museum.

Book Summary

Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now offers an entertaining and informative peephole into colonial New England life, as well as giving insight into a bit of our own.

Book InfoWords They Lived By

Title: Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now

Publisher: IBJ Book Publishing (2013)

Trade paperback; 147 pages with bibliography, index and lots of color and BxW photos and illustrations.

Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The Interview

In this interview we talk about the many words used in colonial speech that are still in use now but may have different meanings. Words like diaper, alarm, neglige, loggerhead and many more. We also discuss the Golden Ball Tavern Museum and the library and archives resources available there.

Prize Winners

Two copies of Words They Lived By: Colonial New England Speech, Then and Now were given out to the Fieldstone Common audience courtesy of Joan Bines.

The winners are:

  • Cathy Blancato of Maryland
  • Susan LeBlanc of Oregon

Congratulations to our winners and thanks to Joan for their generosity in donating the books!

Make sure you qualify to win the giveaway next week by signing up for the Bonus List! Once you sign up your are in the running each week!

The Direct Link to this post is www.fieldstonecommon.com/colonial-new-england-speech-with-joan-bines

News & Announcements

BIG NEWS for Android users! Fieldstone Common is now available in the Android app Stitcher. Stitcher is a program like iTunes but is available on the Android platform. Download Stitcher and search for Fieldstone Common or click here.

Question: What’s that’s new stuff in the Fieldstone Common title (FC 68)?

Answer: That makes it easier, especially for iTunes and other podcast listeners, to keep track of which episode they are listening to. FC stands for Fieldstone Common and 68 is the number of the episode.

**** The new Fieldstone Common Season 2 subscription is now available in iTunes. You will need to subscribe to this link to continue receiving episodes in ITunes. Click on the link to subscribe.

For those of you who haven’t heard yet, Fieldstone Common is no longer broadcast on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen to the show by clicking the play button above or subscribing in iTunes or other podcatchers.

Researching Food: Post Script with Peter G. Rose

Traditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter G. RoseRecently, I interviewed food historian Peter G. Rose about her book Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch (Listen to the interview here). The book describes the traditions and celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch, some of which were carried over from the Netherlands and some of which were adopted in the new world.

With this Post Script interview we dig a little deeper into the occupation of a food historian and how it differs from other types of historians.

Post Script: Researching Food with Peter G. Rose

MPL: How did you become a food historian?

PGR: Becoming a food historian gradually happened as a natural extension of my work as a food columnist for the NY Gannett newspapers. We live in the Hudson Valley and more and more I became aware of the Valley’s Dutch roots. When I visited Historic Hudson Valley’s offices, the curator asked me to look at a Dutch book they had in their archives and to tell her about it. It was the 1683 edition of The Pleasurable Country Life, a book on gardening, beekeeping, medicines, and also a cookbook. That was in the early 1980’s and it took me a long time to properly research its background and – in the time of typewriters – to transcribe the cookbook part as it was too fragile to photocopy.  By 1989, Syracuse University Press published it  with the title The Sensible Cook: Dutch Foodways in the Old and the New World and that was really the beginning for me.

MPL: What do food historians focus on in their work and how do they differ from other types of historians?

PGR: Food historians as you can imagine focus on food. Some study agriculture, fishing or milling or some specific food, others are more interested in preparation, or specific dishes, others look more at ethnic development, assimilation, and cultural connections. For me it was a no-brainer, since I am Dutch, I wanted to know about the Dutch influence on the American kitchen and that is what I have given my attention to for the last 3 decades. What makes my specialty of Dutch food easier to research is that we have so much visual evidence in the paintings of the Golden Age of The Netherlands and American museums have many holdings of Dutch 17th-century art.

MPL: The term “historical foodways” is often associated food historians. What does it mean?

PGR: Foodways is a collective noun which encompasses not only recipes and preparation, Traditions of the Hudson Valley Dutch with Peter G. Rosebut also social customs of the period.
To illustrate:

From 18th and 19th century hand-written Dutch-American cookbooks belonging to the descendants of the early settlers, we know that they continued to cook in the manner of their forebears. Many of the recipes indicate not only the method of preparation but reveal that Dutch social customs continued here as well, as revealed for example by a recipe for doot koeckjes, which are funeral biscuits. From a Schenectady diary we know that the Dutch custom of serving plate size cookies and spiced wine, as well as offering pipes and tobacco at the time of a funeral, still continued until the mid-18th century. Recipes for kandeel, often anglicized to condale indicate that the custom of serving spiced wine mixed with eggs at the time of birth continued as well. Not only agricultural practices and horticultural introductions are attributable to the Dutch colonial past in America, but also doughnuts, coleslaw, waffles, wafers, pretzels, pancakes and above all cookies, to mention only a few examples. The Dutch touch left a lasting mark on the American kitchen.

MPL: Do you try to recreate the historical recipes that you discover? If so, are the recipes surprisingly good or do some disappoint?

PGR: Yes, I do try the recipes I find they work surprisingly well, providing you have enough knowledge of measures and are a reasonably experienced cook. In the case of 17th and 18th-century recipes, a good knowledge of hearth cooking comes into play as well. In general I would say that the recipes are delicious and some are outstanding!

MPL: What is the most fun aspect of being a food historian?

PGR: The most fun aspect of being a food historian is the constant discovery and the finding of little historical tidbits that help in rounding out the total picture. I hope to go on doing this and to go on giving talks because in the Q&A periods I always learn something new and that makes it exciting and great fun!