Defiant Brides now available as a Podcast

PodcasticonbeDerickkwaThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Nancy Rubin Stuart discussing her book Defiant Brides: The Untold Story of Two Revolutionary-Era Women and the Radical Men They Married is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Defiant Brides with Nancy Rubin Stuart

ShowPhoto-RubinStuart-1LIVE: THURSDAY, 30 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Nancy Rubin Stuart, author of Defiant Brides: The Untold Story of Two Revolutionary-Era Women and the Radical Men They Married.

Esteemed biographer Nancy Rubin Stuart takes a close look at the lives of Lucy Flucker Knox and Peggy Shippen Arnold to reveal that neither was simply a “traitor” or “patriot.” In Defiant Brides, the first dual biography of both Peggy Shippen Arnold and Lucy Flucker Knox, Stuart has crafted a rich portrait of two rebellious women who defied expectations and struggled—publicly and privately—in a volatile political moment in early America.

Drawing from never-before-published correspondence, Stuart traces the evolution of these women from passionate teenage brides to mature matrons, bringing both women from the sidelines of history to its vital center. Readers will be enthralled by Stuart’s dramatic account of the epic lives of these defiant brides, which begin with romance, are complicated by politics, and involve spies, disappointments, heroic deeds, tragedies, and personal triumphs.

ShowPhoto-RubinStuart-2Nancy Rubin Stuart is an award-winning author specializing in women’s and social history. She has appeared on national television and NPR and has written for the New York Times, among other publications. Stuart is a board member of the Women Writing Women’s Lives Seminar at the CUNY Graduate Center and executive director of the Cape Cod Writers Center.

 

The Indian Great Awakening with Linford Fisher now a Podcast

PodcasticonbeDerickkwaThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Dr. Linford Fisher discussing his book The Indian Great Awakening: Religion and the Shaping of Native Cultures in Early America is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

The Indian Great Awakening with Linford Fisher

BlogPhoto-Fisher-coverLIVE: THURSDAY, 23 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Dr. Linford Fisher, author of The Indian Great Awakening: Religion and the Shaping of Native Culture in Early America.

The First Great Awakening was a time of heightened religious activity in the colonial New England. Among those whom the English settlers tried to convert to Christianity were the region’s native peoples. In this book, Linford Fisher tells the gripping story of American Indians’ attempts to wrestle with the ongoing realities of colonialism between the 1670s and 1820.

In particular, he looks at how some members of previously unevangelized Indian communities in Connecticut, Rhode Island, western Massachusetts, and Long Island adopted Christian practices, often joining local Congregational churches and receiving baptism. Far from passively sliding into the cultural and physical landscape after King Philip’s War, he argues, Native indivBlogPhoto-Fisher-headshotiduals and communities actively tapped into transatlantic structures of power to protect their land rights, welcomed educational opportunities for their children, and joined local white churches.

Charting this untold story of the Great Awakening and the resultant rise of an Indian Separatism and its effects on Indian cultures as a whole, this gracefully written book challenges long-held notions about religion and Native-Anglo-American interaction

Linford Fisher is an assistant professor of history at Brown University. He received his doctorate from Harvard University in 2008 and taught for a year in the Indiana University system before coming to Brown in 2009. His research field is early American history, including the history of religion in America and Native American history.

 

 

May on Fieldstone Common

Be sure to mark your calendar. We’ll be giving away some great books during the live broadcasts of Fieldstone Common.

2 May 2013 at 1pm EST  Melinde Lutz Byrne Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts with Melinde Lutz Byrne. Melinde Lutz Sanborn discussing her book Lost Babes: Fornication Abstracts from Court Records, Essex County, Massachusetts, 1692-1745 as well her her “Jane Doe” forensic cold case
9 May 2013 at 1pm EST Allegra di Bonaventura For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura.  In this engrossing narrative of family life and the slave experience in the colonial North, Allegra di Bonaventura describes the complexity of this master/slave relationship and traces the intertwining stories of two families until the eve of the Revolution..
16 May 2013 at 1pm EST Barbara Silberman Judith Sargent Murray with Barbara Silberman. Judith Sargent Murray was an 18th century essayist who believed in equal education, a woman’s right to work outside the home and equal roles between men and women in marriage..
23 May 2013 at 1pm EST Dr. Linford Fisher The Indian Great Awakening with Dr. Linford Fisher. The First Great Awakening was a time of heightened religious activity in colonial New England. Among those whom the English settlers tried to convert to Christianity were the region’s native peoples. In this book, Linford Fisher tells the gripping story of American Indians’ attempts to wrestle with the ongoing realities of colonialism between the 1670s and 1820.
30 May 2013 at 1pm EST Nancy Rubin Stuart Defiant Brides with Nancy Rubin Stuart. In Defiant Brides, the first dual biography of both Peggy Shippen Arnold and Lucy Flucker Knox, Stuart has crafted a rich portrait of two rebellious women who defied expectations and struggled—publicly and privately—in a volatile political moment in early America.

Show Notes – Judith Sargent Murray with Barbara Silberman

Barbara Silberman, President of the Sargent House Museum in Gloucester, MAFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 16 May 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Barbara Silberman about Judith Sargent Murray and the Sargent House Museum in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

This interview with Barbara Silberman, president of the Sargent House, details many of the accomplishments of Judith Sargent Murray’s life and showcases her intelligence, tenacity and enduring love for John Murray.

Judith Sargent Murray (1751-1820) was an 18th century essayist who believed in equal education, a woman’s right to work outside the home and equal roles between men and women in marriage. These were quite extraordinary beliefs to be espoused during that time period. As such she was an early advocate for women’s rights. Her second husband was John Murray (1741-1815), an Englishman who established the Universalist denomination in the United States.

The Sargent House where Judith spent her married life, is located in Gloucester, Massachusetts and is open as a house museum. The museum is open each year from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

Each May the Sargent House holds a free event called “Judith Speaks” where volunteers read the words of Judith Sargent that still resonate today. The event is a great introduction to the life and works of Judith Sargent Murray. Here is a video of the Judith Speaks event from 2012 (from the Cox Simoes YouTube page).

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

You can read the full story of the Grandfather Clock — which includes photos of the clock, his grandpa — and the actual thumbtacked note that inspired the Registry — on the Heirloom Registry’s blog.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Judith Sargent Murray with Barbara Silberman now a Podcast

PodcasticonbeDerickkwaThis morning I had the pleasure of interviewing Barbara Silberman, Chairman of the Board of the Sargent House in Gloucester, Massachusetts on Fieldstone Common.

We discussed the life of Judith Sargent Murray, an 18th century essayist who believed in equal education, a woman’s right to work outside the home and equal roles between men and women in marriage. These were quite extraordinary beliefs to be espoused during that time period. The episode is now available as a podcast.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

Show Notes – For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura

For Adam's Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 9 May 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Allegra di Bonaventura about her book For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England, published by Liveright Publishing, a division of WW Norton & Company is available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

The story of For Adam’s Sake revolves around five New London, Connecticut families across several generations in the 1600s and early 1700s.  The families include:

The John Jackson family. This includes his wife, Joan Jackson and their children (among them Adam) and Joan’s mother. They are a combination of enslaved and free African Americans.

The Joshua Hempstead family. It’s Joshua’s diary that forms the basis of the story. The diary has been published and is available for sale from the New London County Historical Society.

The Rogers family. The well to do family is headed by James Rogers but it is son John who is the focus of this story. John become the head of the Rogerenes sect of Adventists.

The Livingston family. Though a New York Anglo/Dutch, son John Livingston moves to New London, Connecticut and marries Fitz Winthrop’s daughter, Mary.

The Winthrop family. The story focuses on the families of Fitz and Waitstill Winthrop who are brothers and grandsons of John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Liveright Publishing, the publisher of For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England, donated two copies of the book which were provided as giveaways during the live show to listeners in Vermont and Missouri. A big thank you to the Liveright Publishing for their generosity!

Houstory - Makers of the Heirloom Registry and the Home History Book

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura now a Podcast

PodcasticonbeDerickkwaThe most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Allegra di Bonaventura discussing her book For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on BlogTalkRadio

For Adam’s Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura

For Adam's Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura on Fieldstone Common For Adam's Sake with Allegra di Bonaventura photo by Andrew HoganLIVE: THURSDAY, 9 May 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Allega di Bonaventura, author of For Adam’s Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England.

In the tradition of Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s classic, A Midwife’s Tale, comes this groundbreaking narrative by one of America’s most promising colonial historians. Joshua Hempstead was a well-respected farmer and tradesman in New London, Connecticut. As his remarkable diary—kept from 1711 until 1758—reveals, he was also a slave owner who owned Adam Jackson for over thirty years. In this engrossing narrative of family life and the slave experience in the colonial North, Allegra di Bonaventura describes the complexity of this master/slave relationship and traces the intertwining stories of two families until the eve of the Revolution. Slavery is often left out of our collective memory of New England’s history, but it was hugely impactful on the central unit of colonial life: the family. In every corner, the lines between slavery and freedom were blurred as families across the social spectrum fought to survive. In this enlightening study, a new portrait of an era emerges.

Allegra di Bonaventura is an assistant dean at the Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in New Haven, Connecticut. Her dissertation was awarded the George Washington Egleston Prize.

Author photo by Andrew Hogan