The Caning with Stephen Puleo now available as a Podcast

The most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Stephen Puleo, author of the book The Caning: The Assault that Drove America to Civil War is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

The Caning with Stephen Puleo

This week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Stephen Puleo, author of The Caning: The Assault That Drove America to Civil War.

One of the most shocking and provocative events in American history, the caning convinced the North and the South that the gulf between them was unbridgeable and that they could no longer discuss their vast differences of opinion regarding slavery on any reasonable level. The Caning: The Assault That Drove America to Civil War tells the incredible story of this transformative event. While Sumner eventually recovered after a lengthy convalescence, compromise had suffered a mortal blow. Moderate voices were drowned out completely; extremist views accelerated, became intractable, and locked both sides on a tragic collision course.

The Caning with Stephen Puleo on Fieldstone Common

The caning had an enormous impact on the events that followed over the next four years: the meteoric rise of the Republican Party and Abraham Lincoln; the Dred Scott decision; the increasing militancy of abolitionists, notably John Brown’s actions; and the secession of the Southern states and the founding of the Confederacy. As a result of the caning, the country was pushed, inexorably and unstoppably, to war. Many factors conspired to cause the Civil War, but it was the caning that made conflict and disunion unavoidable five years later.

STEPHEN PULEO is the author of five books, including the bestselling Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919 and Due to Enemy Action: The True World War II Story of the USS Eagle 56. A former award-winning newspaper reporter and contributor to American History and other publications, he holds a master’s degree in history and teaches at Suffolk University in Boston.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – Carved in Stone with the Gilsons

Carved in Stone with Thomas & William Gilson on Fieldstone Common

** Read “New Service Safeguards Heirlooms’ Lore” in Antique Trader Magazine featuring Fieldstone Common sponsor The Heirloom Registry by Houstory. **

NEW – Sign up to receive  email reminders for Fieldstone Common. Emails will be sent out once a week on Wednesdays. Enter your email address and then on the second page you will have the option to choose Fieldstone Common.

Following are some items that were mentioned during the 24 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Thomas and William Gilson, authors of Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

William Gilson

William Gilson is a writer now based in England. Thomas Gilson is a photographer based in New York. You can view sample images of the gravestone photos from the book on Thomas Gilson’s website

Thomas Gilson

The book Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones, published by the Wesleyan University Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com.

Three well-known gravestone researchers/authors were mentioned during the interview: Harriette Merrifield Forbes, Allan Ludwig and Vincent Luti

A great reference tool for viewing early 20th century black and white photographs of New England gravestones, many of which were photographed before stone deterioration, is the Farber Gravestone Collection at the American Antiquarian Society

A great place to learn more about gravestones and their carvers is the Association for Gravestone Studies. Be sure to check out their scholarly publication, Markers.

You can view gravestone photos by Marian Pierre-Louis on her blog, the Symbolic Past.

The Wesleyan University Press, the publisher of Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones, donated a copy of the book that was given as “door prize” during the live show. The copy went to a listener in Massachusetts. A big thank you to the Wesleyan University Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012.

Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.

Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site. 

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Carved in Stone with the Gilsons now Available as a Podcast

The most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Thomas and William Gilson, authors of the book Carved in Stone: The Artisty of Early New England Gravestones is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Carved in Stone with the Gilsons

LIVE: THURSDAY, 24 January 2013 at 1:00pm EST

This Thursday on Fieldstone Common we will speak with authors and brothers Thomas and William Gilson about their book Carved in Stone: The Artistry of Early New England Gravestones.

Gravestones are colonial America’s earliest sculpture and they provide a unique physical link to the European people who settled here. Carved in Stone is an elegant collection of over 80 fine duotone photographs, each a personal meditation on an old stone carving, and on New England’s past, where these stones tell stories about death at sea, epidemics such as small pox, the loss of children, and a grim view of the afterlife. The essay is a graceful narrative that explores a long personal involvement with the stones and their placement in New England landscape, and attempts to trace the curious and imperfectly documented story of carvers. Brief quotes from early New England writers accompany the images, and captions provide basic information about each stone. These meditative portraits present an intimate view of figures from New England graveyards and will be enjoyed by anyone with an interest in early Americana and fine art photography.

Thomas E. Gilson is the author of The New England Farm, a highly praised book of photographs. He taught black and white photography in Vermont for 17 years and was managing editor and photographer for the New England Farmer. His photographs have been widely published and exhibited.

William Gilson attended the University of Connecticut, and his writing has been published in journals and magazines including New England Review, Orion, and Poetry Salzburg Review.

The Gilson brothers were born and raised in Connecticut.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Show Notes – The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Mofford

The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone CommonFollowing are some items that were mentioned during the 17 January 2013 Fieldstone Common interview with Juliet Haines Mofford, author of The Devil Made Me Do It: Crime and Punishment in Early New England.

The podcast of the interview is now available.

You can connect with Juliet Mofford Haines on Facebook and LinkedIn. Juliet also gave out her email address during the show. Have a listen to the show to get that.

The book The Devil Made Me Do It, published by the Globe Pequot Press, is available for purchase from major books sellers online and off such as Amazon.com

Juliet has published eleven books some of which include  

  • Cry “witch”: the Salem witch trials, 1692 (Discovery Enterprises, 1995) 
  • Greater Lawrence, a bibliography : an annotated guide to the history of Andover, Methuen, Lawrence, and North Andover (Merrimack Valley Textiles Museum, 1978) The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone Common
  • The history of North Parish Church of North Andover, 1645-1974: and firm thine ancient vow (Mofford, 1975). 

She has also written a number of history books targeted toward juvenile readers.

One of the places that Juliet mentions during the interview is the Old Gaol in York, Maine.  Juliet not only worked there previously but she also writes about it in the book. The Old Gaol is part of the The Old York Historical Society which has  number of historical buildings which you can visit.

The Globe Pequot Press, the publisher of The Devil Made Me Do It: Crime and Punishment in Early New England, donated two copies of the book that were given as “door prizes” during the live show. One copy went to a listener in Colorado and the other to a listener in Massachusetts. A big thank you to the Globe Pequot Press for  their generosity!

To see the Heirloom Registry entry — including photos — for the radio, visit www.heirloomregistry.com and enter registration number: SNTS-256-996-3497-2012. Fieldstone Common’s sponsor is Houstory, makers of the Home History Book and the Heirloom Registry. Fieldstone Common listeners can take 15 % off their Heirloom Registry order by visiting the Heirloom Registry at www.heirloomregistry.com, and entering FIELDSTONE – in all caps – at checkout.Fieldstone Common greatly appreciates the support of Houstory as a sponsor. Show your support for Fieldstone Common by visiting our sponsor’s site.


Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Mofford now a Podcast

The most recent episode of Fieldstone Common featuring Juliet Haines Mofford, author of the book The Devil Made Me Do It: Crime and Punishment in Early New England is now available as a podcast.

The podcast can be played through the computer using your default media player (click play below) or downloaded to iTunes (also below).

Listen to internet radio with Fieldstone Common on Blog Talk Radio
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Haines Mofford

LIVE: THURSDAY, 17 January 2013 at 1:00pm EST

This Thursday on Fieldstone Common we will speak author Juliet Haines Mofford about her book The Devil Made Me Do It! Crime and Punishment in Early New England.

Whether it was Sabbath-breaking, blasphemy, or public drunkenness, colonial laws were strict and frequently broken, and those who broke them could expect swift punishment. Laws were designed to reflect Puritan ideas of ensuring God’s blessings upon the community, as well as to tightly maintain order in ways that would benefit the entire colony. Each neighbor had a role in preserving family values and keeping the community safe from “railing scolds,” vagabonds, malefactors, and malefic witches.

Some of the ways that seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century New England communities dealt with murder and mayhem seem brutal to modern sensibilities. Today, Joan Andrews would not be forced to wear a T for theft upon her bodice for placing stones in the firkin of butter she sold a client. And Lydea Abbot would certainly not be made to suffer in the stocks for “uttering ten profain curses.”

The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone Common
Juliet Haines Mofford

Drawing from early court dockets, diaries, sermons, gaolers’ records, and other primary sources, the chapters in this book investigate crimes like these and illuminate the social and political causes behind legal cases from a time when accused felons often pleaded in their own defense: “The Devil made me do it!”

Juliet Haines Mofford is a historian and museum educator based in Maine. Two of her eleven books received national awards from the American Association for State and Local History. Her feature articles have appeared in the Boston Globe and many other publications. She served on the educational board of the American Association of Museums.

Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis

Upcoming in January on Fieldstone Common

Be sure to mark your calendar. We’ll be giving away some great books during the live broadcasts of Fieldstone Common.

3 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
In Death Lamented with Sarah Nehama on Fieldstone Common
In Death Lamented with Sarah Nehama. Sarah Nehama is a jeweler who has a passion for historical jewelry, in particular mourning jewelry. She is the curator of the recent exhibit on mourning jewelry at the Mass. Historical Society and the author of the companion book In Death Lamented.

10 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
New England Genealogy with David Allen Lambert on Fieldstone Common

New England Genealogy with David Allen Lambert. David Allen Lambert is the Chief Genealogist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society. His book A Guide to Massachusetts Cemetery is already in the 2nd edition. We will talk about Cemetery Research, Native American and African genealogy and hopefully a little  baseball too.
17 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
The Devil Made Me Do It with Juliet Haines Mofford on Fieldstone Common
The Devil Made Me Do It! with Juliet Mofford Haines.  Whether it was Sabbath-breaking, blasphemy, or public drunkenness, colonial laws were strict and frequently broken, and those who broke them could expect swift punishment. We’ll discuss from a time when accused felons often pleaded in their own defense: “The Devil made me do it!”
24 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
Carved in Stone with Thomas Gilson on Fieldstone Common
Carved in Stone with William Gilson on Fieldstone Common
Carved in Stone with Thomas and William Gilson. Thomas and William Gilson have created a book that captures the art and beauty of colonial gravestones in words and photographs. Take a virtual walk with us through New England’s oldest graveyards.
31 Jan 2013 at 1pm EST
The Caning with Stephen Puleo on Fieldstone Common
The Caning with Stephen Puleo. One of the most shocking and provocative events in American history, the caning of Senator Charles Sumner in 1856 convinced the north and the south that the gulf between them was unbridgeable. As a result of the caning, the country was pushed, inexorably and unstoppably, to war.
Copyright 2012-2013 Marian Pierre-Louis